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What is a USB A to A cable used for?

Hello!

I was wondering, what is a USB A to A cable used for?? It doesn't make any sense...

This is what I am talking about: http://www.amazon.com/Type-Male-Cable-Version-Black/dp/B000I9B2AU/ref=pd_bxgy_e_img_b

So, what are they used for??!

Please reply!!

Thanks!

--Yogman
5 answers Last reply
More about what cable
  1. USB A-Type

    Found on host controllers in computers and hubs, the A-style connector is a flat, rectangular interface. This interface holds the connection in place by friction which makes it very easy for users to connect and disconnect. Instead of round pins, the connector uses flat contacts which can withstand continuous attachment and removal very well. The A-socket connector provides a "downstream" connection that is intended for use solely on host controllers and hubs. It was not intended for use as an "upstream" connector on a peripheral device. This is critical because a host controller or hub is designed to provide 5V DC power on one of the USB pins. Though not that common, A-A cables are used to connect USB devices with an A-style Female port to a PC or another USB device, and for data transfer between two computer systems. Note: Typically an A-A cable is not intended to connect two computers together or to connect a USB hub between two computers. Doing so may cause irreparable damage to your computers and may even present a fire hazard. Check with the manufacturer before using an A-A cable for data transfer.

    [:briovaz:3]
  2. I have seen a portable drive with an A connection on it, and some chargers use an A connection (I have a cheap Wii battery charger that has that).
  3. A-A cables are forbidden by the standard. You can not use them for any legal purpose.
    They are made by people who have no clues, assuming that if it makes sense for network cables and serial cables it must be good for USB as well.
    Peripheral devices having A-receptacle connectors are also not standard-compliant (unless they have an internal hub and the A-receptacle is a host port). Some home-made or small volume devices are just laziness and stupidity - couldn't be bothered to use the right connector. Chinese manufacturers of non-compliant devices probably could get cheap A-A cables because nobody wanted them, and had A-receptacles left-over from hub manufacturing.

    The only way 2 computers can be connected with only an A-A cable is by using a data-transfer cable which has electronics in the middle and appears to each computer as a network interface or similar, so it uses USB properly.
  4. A-A cables are forbidden by the standard. You can not use them for any legal purpose.
    Wrong, first the only type A to A cable use in the USB standard is for bridges used to connect two computers together. When two computers are connected with an A-male – A-male cable there will be no power current and no danger of failure. Extensions are prohibited by the code, because cable length requirements of USB.
    Second, it is not illegal to use or design a use with an A-male – A-male cable, but it is non-standard and automatic plug and play will not normally work. A designer should take into consideration that the standard is for the A type of receptacle is to supply the 5 Volt power.

    They are made by people who have no clues, assuming that if it makes sense for network cables and serial cables it must be good for USB as well.
    Again, wrong. Usually it is best to stay within standards, but there are many reasons to design or use something that is non-standard. IBM, Microsoft, Apple and others manufacture and design many products that are non-standard. And wouldn’t it be nice to design a Web page to standards and have it work in IE, Firefox and other browsers and have it work without patches and special code!! Innovation is almost always developed, when standards are extended or ignored. Of course, there are also many who have no clue.

    Peripheral devices having A-receptacle connectors are also not standard-compliant (unless they have an internal hub and the A-receptacle is a host port). Some home-made or small volume devices are just laziness and stupidity - couldn't be bothered to use the right connector. Chinese manufacturers of non-compliant devices probably could get cheap A-A cables because nobody wanted them, and had A-receptacles left-over from hub manufacturing.
    True, but just because it was made in China doesn’t mean it was designed in China. Some, lazy or ignorant American or European may have designed it.

    The only way 2 computers can be connected with only an A-A cable is by using a data-transfer cable which has electronics in the middle and appears to each computer as a network interface or similar, so it uses USB properly.
    Obviously not true, bridging computers is the only use approved by the code. Some computer manufacturers supply an A-male – A-male passive cable, but also supply a program to transfer data from the old computer to the new one using USB to USB. The A-A transfer cable usually supplies the program from its internal flash drive, which usually starts when the two computers are connected.

    John
  5. USB A-to-A cables are permitted by the standard, but rarely used. I recently got a nice USB 3.0 Hub with an A connector as the upstream port, so it takes an A-to-A cable to hook it up to the host. Other uses might include host-to-host transfer cable, though this isn't likely to work smoothly (plug and play isn't expecting this scenario.)

    A-to-A cables may be important in some debugging situations, debug port use of USB is a developing option, but not typical consumer usage.

    JohnAC: Your reply has all the right facts, but unfortunately emphasizes (i.e. bold) what is wrong with another post rather than what the answer to the original question was. Personally, I found the information you presented excellent, I'm just not able to upvote it based on style. Thanks anyway.
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