Changed Motherboard and formatted C:/drive and now need to..

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

This is on my daughters Computer but it refuses to let her re-register.
Should she de-register first? and how does she do that?
14 answers Last reply
More about changed motherboard formatted drive
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Sorry all, I mean it refuses to allow her to activate Win XP (Not register)

    "Norm" wrote:

    > This is on my daughters Computer but it refuses to let her re-register.
    > Should she de-register first? and how does she do that?
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    what are you talking about? If you have the OEM version of windows it is
    tied to the MOBO and you may not be able to use it!

    Wayne

    "Norm" <Norm@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:C38645E9-F7C8-4BB7-9E65-12D7CE51C986@microsoft.com...
    > This is on my daughters Computer but it refuses to let her re-register.
    > Should she de-register first? and how does she do that?
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    In news:L4idnR5srvhANTrfRVn-uw@comcast.com,
    wayne <komon@dgdg.sss> typed:

    > what are you talking about? If you have the OEM version of
    > windows
    > it is tied to the MOBO and you may not be able to use it!


    A clarification here: this is far from always true. *Some* OEM
    version, not all by any means, are BIOS-locked to the
    motherboard.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup


    > Wayne
    >
    > "Norm" <Norm@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:C38645E9-F7C8-4BB7-9E65-12D7CE51C986@microsoft.com...
    >> This is on my daughters Computer but it refuses to let her
    >> re-register. Should she de-register first? and how does she do
    >> that?
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Ah the five second activation joys! Man, this is going to be a real PR
    headache for MS.

    LOL!

    Norm, you will have to use the phone in activation method.

    Alias


    "Norm" <Norm@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:C38645E9-F7C8-4BB7-9E65-12D7CE51C986@microsoft.com...
    > This is on my daughters Computer but it refuses to let her re-register.
    > Should she de-register first? and how does she do that?
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    no she probably can't register if it was an OEM copy the license is tied to
    the motherboard that is one of the reasons why OEM is cheaper

    Wayne


    "Alias" <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> wrote in message
    news:uwCUlrJbFHA.2420@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > Ah the five second activation joys! Man, this is going to be a real PR
    > headache for MS.
    >
    > LOL!
    >
    > Norm, you will have to use the phone in activation method.
    >
    > Alias
    >
    >
    > "Norm" <Norm@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:C38645E9-F7C8-4BB7-9E65-12D7CE51C986@microsoft.com...
    >> This is on my daughters Computer but it refuses to let her re-register.
    >> Should she de-register first? and how does she do that?
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    news:uwQKO2JbFHA.612@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > In news:L4idnR5srvhANTrfRVn-uw@comcast.com,
    > wayne <komon@dgdg.sss> typed:
    >
    > > what are you talking about? If you have the OEM version of
    > > windows
    > > it is tied to the MOBO and you may not be able to use it!
    >
    >
    > A clarification here: this is far from always true. *Some* OEM
    > version, not all by any means, are BIOS-locked to the
    > motherboard.
    >
    > --
    > Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    > Please reply to the newsgroup
    >
    >
    > > Wayne
    > >

    Believe, in the case of bios locked versions, the XP installation will not
    occur. I gather from the post that has indeed happened.

    > > "Norm" <Norm@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > > news:C38645E9-F7C8-4BB7-9E65-12D7CE51C986@microsoft.com...
    > >> This is on my daughters Computer but it refuses to let her
    > >> re-register. Should she de-register first? and how does she do
    > >> that?
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "wayne" <komon@dgdg.sss> wrote in message
    news:L4idnR5srvhANTrfRVn-uw@comcast.com...
    > what are you talking about? If you have the OEM version of windows it is
    > tied to the MOBO and you may not be able to use it!
    >
    > Wayne

    Horsepucky. Read the EULA. It says "one computer" and "hardware". Nowhere in
    the EULA does it say MOBO or "motherboard".

    Alias
    >
    > "Norm" <Norm@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:C38645E9-F7C8-4BB7-9E65-12D7CE51C986@microsoft.com...
    >> This is on my daughters Computer but it refuses to let her re-register.
    >> Should she de-register first? and how does she do that?
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "wayne" <komon@dgdg.sss> wrote in message
    news:8MWdnVMQ6O5lNjrfRVn-2g@comcast.com...
    > no she probably can't register if it was an OEM copy the license is tied
    > to the motherboard that is one of the reasons why OEM is cheaper
    >
    > Wayne

    Generic OEMs are NOT tied to the motherboard.

    Alias
    >
    >
    > "Alias" <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> wrote in message
    > news:uwCUlrJbFHA.2420@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >> Ah the five second activation joys! Man, this is going to be a real PR
    >> headache for MS.
    >>
    >> LOL!
    >>
    >> Norm, you will have to use the phone in activation method.
    >>
    >> Alias
    >>
    >>
    >> "Norm" <Norm@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> news:C38645E9-F7C8-4BB7-9E65-12D7CE51C986@microsoft.com...
    >>> This is on my daughters Computer but it refuses to let her re-register.
    >>> Should she de-register first? and how does she do that?
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    This is from Microsoft about OEM licenses

    The End User License Agreement (EULA) for OEM software, including Windows
    XP, states that the software is licensed as a single integrated product in
    connection with the hardware. However, it's important to remember that the
    end user cannot see nor accept the electronic EULA until the software is
    installed on a fully-assembled computer system. So, even though the
    original OEM software unit may have been distributed with a component, like
    a hard drive, it isn't until the software is installed on a fully-assembled
    computer system that it becomes "married" to the hardware.

    In general, OEM software may not be transferred from one system to another
    system. However, the computer system can certainly be updated with new
    components without the requirement of a new software license. The only
    exception to this is the motherboard 1. If the motherboard is replaced 2,
    the computer system is deemed "new" and a new license would be required.
    Other PC components may be upgraded, including a hard drive. Though if the
    hard drive 3 is replaced/upgraded, the operating system must first be
    removed from the old hard drive. To restate: the operating system is
    "married" to the computer system on which it is originally installed.

    If you haven't already, please take a moment to review a comprehensive
    group of OEM Licensing Questions and Answers which are specific to system
    builders:
    https://oem.microsoft.com/worldwide/514341.asp.

    Wayne

    "Alias" <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> wrote in message
    news:eCFUznNbFHA.3132@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    >
    > "wayne" <komon@dgdg.sss> wrote in message
    > news:8MWdnVMQ6O5lNjrfRVn-2g@comcast.com...
    >> no she probably can't register if it was an OEM copy the license is tied
    >> to the motherboard that is one of the reasons why OEM is cheaper
    >>
    >> Wayne
    >
    > Generic OEMs are NOT tied to the motherboard.
    >
    > Alias
    >>
    >>
    >> "Alias" <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> wrote in message
    >> news:uwCUlrJbFHA.2420@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >>> Ah the five second activation joys! Man, this is going to be a real PR
    >>> headache for MS.
    >>>
    >>> LOL!
    >>>
    >>> Norm, you will have to use the phone in activation method.
    >>>
    >>> Alias
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Norm" <Norm@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >>> news:C38645E9-F7C8-4BB7-9E65-12D7CE51C986@microsoft.com...
    >>>> This is on my daughters Computer but it refuses to let her re-register.
    >>>> Should she de-register first? and how does she do that?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >


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  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "wayne" <komon@dgdg.sss> wrote in message
    news:SaCdnfGbrI8TRTXfRVn-oQ@comcast.com...
    > This is from Microsoft about OEM licenses
    >
    > The End User License Agreement (EULA) for OEM software, including Windows
    > XP, states that the software is licensed as a single integrated product in
    > connection with the hardware. However, it's important to remember that
    > the end user cannot see nor accept the electronic EULA until the software
    > is installed on a fully-assembled computer system. So, even though the
    > original OEM software unit may have been distributed with a component,
    > like a hard drive, it isn't until the software is installed on a
    > fully-assembled computer system that it becomes "married" to the hardware.
    >
    > In general, OEM software may not be transferred from one system to another
    > system. However, the computer system can certainly be updated with new
    > components without the requirement of a new software license. The only
    > exception to this is the motherboard 1. If the motherboard is replaced
    > 2, the computer system is deemed "new" and a new license would be
    > required. Other PC components may be upgraded, including a hard drive.
    > Though if the hard drive 3 is replaced/upgraded, the operating system
    > must first be removed from the old hard drive. To restate: the operating
    > system is "married" to the computer system on which it is originally
    > installed.
    >
    > If you haven't already, please take a moment to review a comprehensive
    > group of OEM Licensing Questions and Answers which are specific to system
    > builders:
    > https://oem.microsoft.com/worldwide/514341.asp.
    >
    > Wayne

    What's that got to do with a person buying a *generic* OEM? My EULAs don't
    say "motherboard" in Spanish or English. They both say "hardware" and
    "computer" only. I am not a "system builder". With the way electronics goes
    today, a motherboard bought a year ago is out of date. For example, I have
    one sitting over there that will not take a graphic AGP 8x card, only 4x.
    Try to get a 4x graphic card nowadays. If one upgrades one's motherboard,
    it's still the same computer, now isn't it?

    Alias
    >
    > "Alias" <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> wrote in message
    > news:eCFUznNbFHA.3132@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    >>
    >> "wayne" <komon@dgdg.sss> wrote in message
    >> news:8MWdnVMQ6O5lNjrfRVn-2g@comcast.com...
    >>> no she probably can't register if it was an OEM copy the license is tied
    >>> to the motherboard that is one of the reasons why OEM is cheaper
    >>>
    >>> Wayne
    >>
    >> Generic OEMs are NOT tied to the motherboard.
    >>
    >> Alias
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Alias" <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> wrote in message
    >>> news:uwCUlrJbFHA.2420@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >>>> Ah the five second activation joys! Man, this is going to be a real PR
    >>>> headache for MS.
    >>>>
    >>>> LOL!
    >>>>
    >>>> Norm, you will have to use the phone in activation method.
    >>>>
    >>>> Alias
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> "Norm" <Norm@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >>>> news:C38645E9-F7C8-4BB7-9E65-12D7CE51C986@microsoft.com...
    >>>>> This is on my daughters Computer but it refuses to let her
    >>>>> re-register.
    >>>>> Should she de-register first? and how does she do that?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    >
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    nope the "computer is made up of several components MS allows you to change
    these components but they all connect to the motherboard. That is the one
    component that you cannot change with an OEM license. You keep mentioning
    "generic"

    There is no such thing. Certain large companies purchase a license from
    Microsoft to install XP on their computers. They can if they choose tie that
    copy to their hardware. All other versions are OEM and are supposed to be
    sold as part of a system

    Perhaps this from the Microsoft web site will help to explain.

    I am pulling this from the system builder site

    Generally, you may upgrade or replace all of the hardware components on your
    customer's computer and the end user may maintain the license for the
    original Microsoft® OEM operating system software, with the exception of an
    upgrade or replacement of the motherboard.
    An upgrade of the motherboard is considered to result in a "new personal
    computer" to which Microsoft® OEM operating system software cannot be
    transferred from another computer. If the motherboard is upgraded or
    replaced, for reasons other than a defect, then a new computer has been
    created and the license of new operating system software is required.
    If the motherboard is replaced because it is defective, you do NOT need to
    acquire a new operating system license for the PC.
    The reason for this licensing rule primarily relates to the end-user license
    agreement (EULA) and the support of the software covered by that EULA. The
    EULA is a set of usage rights granted to the end-user by the PC manufacturer
    and relates only to rights for that software as installed on that particular
    PC. The System Builder is required to support the software on that
    individual PC. Understanding that end users, over time, upgrade their PC
    with different components, Microsoft needed to have one base component "left
    standing" that would still define that original PC. Since the motherboard
    contains the CPU and is the "heart and soul" of the PC, when the motherboard
    is replaced (for reasons other than defect) a new PC is essentially created.
    The original System Builder, therefore, can not be expected to support this
    new PC that they in effect, did not manufacture.

    OEM copies for "retail " sale by themselve are pirated. they are supposed to
    be sold with hardware IE a system

    License Types
    Microsoft offers four ways for partners to acquire licenses: Volume
    Licensing for organizations, original equipment manufacturers, independent
    software vendors, and Full Packaged Product.
    a.. Volume Licensing for Organizations
    Volume Licensing programs offers substantial cost savings to customers
    purchasing five or more licenses.
    b.. Independent Software Vendors
    Independent software vendors (ISVs) allow companies that develop software
    solutions to embed Microsoft software with their own applications to create
    and sell complete, integrated solutions.
    c.. Original Equipment Manufacturers
    Products licensed through an original equipment manufacturer (OEM), such
    as Microsoft Windows operating systems, come installed when your partners
    purchase a new computer.
    d.. Full Packaged Product (Retail)
    Full Packaged Product (FPP) refers to shrink-wrapped boxes of licensed
    product that your partners can purchase in a local retail store or from any
    local software retailer.

    Because Volume Licensing offers business opportunities for you to pass
    savings and value along to your customers, the Microsoft for Partners
    program and website focuses primarily on Volume Licensing programs.
    Volume Licensing Overview
    How Can Volume Licensing Help Build Your Business?
    Microsoft's licensing programs reduce the cost of software acquisition,
    software licensing management, and technology development for your
    customers. The various programs are customized for different business types,
    such as corporate versus academic, and offer programs for different business
    needs, such as small business perpetual versus non-perpetual licenses.
    Plus, with the added benefit of Software Assurance at each level of the
    Volume Licensing programs, your customers can gain improved:
    a.. Productivity: Acquire the latest software automatically, spread
    payments annually, and extend the workplace to the home.
    b.. Support: Access resources that help keep business systems running
    smoothly.
    c.. Tools: Deploy software efficiently, monitor errors, and access
    Microsoft Windows -based source code.
    d.. Training: Bring employees up to speed quickly on new products and keep
    IT staff up-to-date on the latest technical information.
    All Licensing Programs
    Use the following table to find the licensing programs and resources that
    are right for your clients.
    Volume Licensing Programs
    Microsoft Software License Type Customer Size Customer Type
    Customer Profile
    Software Assurance Available with all license types Five or
    more PCs Corporate, academic, charity, government Designed for use with all
    licenses, Software Assurance gives customers automatic access to new
    technology and provides productivity benefits, support, tools, and training
    to help deploy and use software efficiently.
    Software Advisor Available with Open License Value Five to 250
    PCs Corporate, government As a Microsoft Software Advisor your organization
    will be rewarded for its assistance to small and medium business customers
    ("End User Customers") in assessing Microsoft technology and acquiring
    Microsoft Open License Value Software.
    Open License 6.0 Open Business
    Open Volume Open Value *
    Multi Year Open**
    Open Subscription Licensing (OSL) ** Five or more PCs Corporate,
    academic, charity, government Designed for customers who desire an easy,
    one-time transaction process with the flexibility of acquiring licenses from
    a broad reseller channel, with the ability to spread payments annually.
    Select License 6.0 Company-wide Option 250 or more PCs
    Corporate, academic, charity, government Designed for medium, large, and
    multinational organizations with mixed Microsoft license requirements,
    decentralized purchasing, and the ability to forecast purchases.
    Enterprise Agreement 6.0 Enterprise Agreement
    Enterprise Subscription Agreement 250 or more PCs Corporate
    Designed for medium, large, and multinational companies that are interested
    in standardizing their enterprise and value the benefits of centralized
    purchasing.
    Academic Licensing All license types No minimum Academic
    institutions of various sizes Four Volume Licensing solutions that are
    designed to meet the specific needs of education institutions.


    Independent Software Vendor Program
    Microsoft Software License Type Customer Size Customer Type Customer
    Profile
    ISV Royalty Licensing Embedded License No Minimum Corporate
    and Academic The Microsoft ISV Royalty License Agreement is a Microsoft
    licensing program intended for Independent Software Vendors (ISVs) who wish
    to distribute Microsoft software along with their commercial business
    applications.


    Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) Program
    Microsoft Software License Type Customer Size Customer Type Customer
    Profile
    System Builder N/A No minimum Corporate Designed for system
    builders who want to install OEM-licensed software on their systems.


    Retail
    Microsoft Software License Type Customer Size Customer Type Customer
    Profile
    Full Packaged Product No minimum Consumers Designed for
    single-application Microsoft buyers.


    "Alias" <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> wrote in message
    news:O217CEVbFHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    >
    > "wayne" <komon@dgdg.sss> wrote in message
    > news:SaCdnfGbrI8TRTXfRVn-oQ@comcast.com...
    >> This is from Microsoft about OEM licenses
    >>
    >> The End User License Agreement (EULA) for OEM software, including Windows
    >> XP, states that the software is licensed as a single integrated product
    >> in connection with the hardware. However, it's important to remember
    >> that the end user cannot see nor accept the electronic EULA until the
    >> software is installed on a fully-assembled computer system. So, even
    >> though the original OEM software unit may have been distributed with a
    >> component, like a hard drive, it isn't until the software is installed on
    >> a fully-assembled computer system that it becomes "married" to the
    >> hardware.
    >>
    >> In general, OEM software may not be transferred from one system to
    >> another system. However, the computer system can certainly be updated
    >> with new components without the requirement of a new software license.
    >> The only exception to this is the motherboard 1. If the motherboard is
    >> replaced 2, the computer system is deemed "new" and a new license would
    >> be required. Other PC components may be upgraded, including a hard drive.
    >> Though if the hard drive 3 is replaced/upgraded, the operating system
    >> must first be removed from the old hard drive. To restate: the operating
    >> system is "married" to the computer system on which it is originally
    >> installed.
    >>
    >> If you haven't already, please take a moment to review a comprehensive
    >> group of OEM Licensing Questions and Answers which are specific to system
    >> builders:
    >> https://oem.microsoft.com/worldwide/514341.asp.
    >>
    >> Wayne
    >
    > What's that got to do with a person buying a *generic* OEM? My EULAs don't
    > say "motherboard" in Spanish or English. They both say "hardware" and
    > "computer" only. I am not a "system builder". With the way electronics
    > goes today, a motherboard bought a year ago is out of date. For example, I
    > have one sitting over there that will not take a graphic AGP 8x card, only
    > 4x. Try to get a 4x graphic card nowadays. If one upgrades one's
    > motherboard, it's still the same computer, now isn't it?
    >
    > Alias
    >>
    >> "Alias" <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> wrote in message
    >> news:eCFUznNbFHA.3132@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    >>>
    >>> "wayne" <komon@dgdg.sss> wrote in message
    >>> news:8MWdnVMQ6O5lNjrfRVn-2g@comcast.com...
    >>>> no she probably can't register if it was an OEM copy the license is
    >>>> tied
    >>>> to the motherboard that is one of the reasons why OEM is cheaper
    >>>>
    >>>> Wayne
    >>>
    >>> Generic OEMs are NOT tied to the motherboard.
    >>>
    >>> Alias
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> "Alias" <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> wrote in message
    >>>> news:uwCUlrJbFHA.2420@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >>>>> Ah the five second activation joys! Man, this is going to be a real PR
    >>>>> headache for MS.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> LOL!
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Norm, you will have to use the phone in activation method.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Alias
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "Norm" <Norm@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >>>>> news:C38645E9-F7C8-4BB7-9E65-12D7CE51C986@microsoft.com...
    >>>>>> This is on my daughters Computer but it refuses to let her
    >>>>>> re-register.
    >>>>>> Should she de-register first? and how does she do that?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    In news:CbSdnc_k0c0tQzXfRVn-3g@comcast.com,
    wayne <komon@dgdg.sss> typed:

    > nope the "computer is made up of several components MS allows
    > you to
    > change these components but they all connect to the
    > motherboard. That is the one component that you cannot change
    > with an OEM license.


    What you can not change with an OEM license is the "computer."
    The Microsoft OEM EULA does not precisely define exactly what
    constitutes the "computer." Considering that the computer is the
    motherboard certainly makes sense, and that's a view that's
    supported by many people, but it's very far from clear that
    that's corect, or that that viewpoint would be upheld in a court
    of law.


    > You keep mentioning "generic"
    >
    > There is no such thing.


    Of course there is. A "generic" OEM CD is one that has not been
    customized by a particular OEM. It's identical to the Full retail
    CD except that it can not do an upgrade installation. And its
    license of course is different.


    > Certain large companies purchase a license
    > from Microsoft to install XP on their computers. They can if
    > they
    > choose tie that copy to their hardware. All other versions are
    > OEM
    > and are supposed to be sold as part of a system


    Not true. Generic OEM versions are widely available, and can
    legally be bought without being sold as part of a system. The
    requirement is that they have to be sold with a piece of
    non-peripheral hardware. Almost any piece of hardware qualifies,
    and from a practical standpoint, anyone can easily buy one of
    these at any time, by spending only an extra few dollars for that
    piece of hardware.


    > Perhaps this from the Microsoft web site will help to explain.
    >
    > I am pulling this from the system builder site


    Yes, I'm aware of what it says on the System Builder site.
    However, this is not the EULA, and doesn't bind the purchaser of
    an OEM version. Only the EULA binds the purchaser, and the EULA
    does *not* define what constitutes the "same computer."

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup


    >
    > Generally, you may upgrade or replace all of the hardware
    > components
    > on your customer's computer and the end user may maintain the
    > license
    > for the original Microsoft® OEM operating system software, with
    > the
    > exception of an upgrade or replacement of the motherboard.
    > An upgrade of the motherboard is considered to result in a "new
    > personal computer" to which Microsoft® OEM operating system
    > software
    > cannot be transferred from another computer.
  13. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "wayne" <komon@dgdg.sss> wrote in message
    news:CbSdnc_k0c0tQzXfRVn-3g@comcast.com...
    > nope the "computer is made up of several components MS allows you to
    > change these components but they all connect to the motherboard. That is
    > the one component that you cannot change with an OEM license. You keep
    > mentioning "generic"
    >
    > There is no such thing.

    Horsepucky. I have three of them.

    > Certain large companies purchase a license from Microsoft to install XP on
    > their computers. They can if they choose tie that copy to their hardware.
    > All other versions are OEM and are supposed to be sold as part of a system

    Not in Spain. I have bought three without any hardware at all. I installed
    one on an old Pent III HP.

    >
    > Perhaps this from the Microsoft web site will help to explain.
    >
    > I am pulling this from the system builder site

    Again, I am not a system builder.

    In Spain, you would be hard pressed to find a full retail copy of either
    Home or XP Pro. Need urls?

    Alias
    >
    > Generally, you may upgrade or replace all of the hardware components on
    > your customer's computer and the end user may maintain the license for the
    > original Microsoft® OEM operating system software, with the exception of
    > an upgrade or replacement of the motherboard.
    > An upgrade of the motherboard is considered to result in a "new personal
    > computer" to which Microsoft® OEM operating system software cannot be
    > transferred from another computer. If the motherboard is upgraded or
    > replaced, for reasons other than a defect, then a new computer has been
    > created and the license of new operating system software is required.
    > If the motherboard is replaced because it is defective, you do NOT need to
    > acquire a new operating system license for the PC.
    > The reason for this licensing rule primarily relates to the end-user
    > license agreement (EULA) and the support of the software covered by that
    > EULA. The EULA is a set of usage rights granted to the end-user by the PC
    > manufacturer and relates only to rights for that software as installed on
    > that particular PC. The System Builder is required to support the software
    > on that individual PC. Understanding that end users, over time, upgrade
    > their PC with different components, Microsoft needed to have one base
    > component "left standing" that would still define that original PC. Since
    > the motherboard contains the CPU and is the "heart and soul" of the PC,
    > when the motherboard is replaced (for reasons other than defect) a new PC
    > is essentially created. The original System Builder, therefore, can not be
    > expected to support this new PC that they in effect, did not manufacture.
    >
    > OEM copies for "retail " sale by themselve are pirated. they are supposed
    > to be sold with hardware IE a system
    >
    > License Types
    > Microsoft offers four ways for partners to acquire licenses: Volume
    > Licensing for organizations, original equipment manufacturers, independent
    > software vendors, and Full Packaged Product.
    > a.. Volume Licensing for Organizations
    > Volume Licensing programs offers substantial cost savings to customers
    > purchasing five or more licenses.
    > b.. Independent Software Vendors
    > Independent software vendors (ISVs) allow companies that develop software
    > solutions to embed Microsoft software with their own applications to
    > create and sell complete, integrated solutions.
    > c.. Original Equipment Manufacturers
    > Products licensed through an original equipment manufacturer (OEM), such
    > as Microsoft Windows operating systems, come installed when your partners
    > purchase a new computer.
    > d.. Full Packaged Product (Retail)
    > Full Packaged Product (FPP) refers to shrink-wrapped boxes of licensed
    > product that your partners can purchase in a local retail store or from
    > any local software retailer.
    >
    > Because Volume Licensing offers business opportunities for you to pass
    > savings and value along to your customers, the Microsoft for Partners
    > program and website focuses primarily on Volume Licensing programs.
    > Volume Licensing Overview
    > How Can Volume Licensing Help Build Your Business?
    > Microsoft's licensing programs reduce the cost of software acquisition,
    > software licensing management, and technology development for your
    > customers. The various programs are customized for different business
    > types, such as corporate versus academic, and offer programs for different
    > business needs, such as small business perpetual versus non-perpetual
    > licenses.
    > Plus, with the added benefit of Software Assurance at each level of the
    > Volume Licensing programs, your customers can gain improved:
    > a.. Productivity: Acquire the latest software automatically, spread
    > payments annually, and extend the workplace to the home.
    > b.. Support: Access resources that help keep business systems running
    > smoothly.
    > c.. Tools: Deploy software efficiently, monitor errors, and access
    > Microsoft Windows -based source code.
    > d.. Training: Bring employees up to speed quickly on new products and
    > keep IT staff up-to-date on the latest technical information.
    > All Licensing Programs
    > Use the following table to find the licensing programs and resources that
    > are right for your clients.
    > Volume Licensing Programs
    > Microsoft Software License Type Customer Size Customer Type
    > Customer Profile
    > Software Assurance Available with all license types Five or
    > more PCs Corporate, academic, charity, government Designed for use with
    > all licenses, Software Assurance gives customers automatic access to new
    > technology and provides productivity benefits, support, tools, and
    > training to help deploy and use software efficiently.
    > Software Advisor Available with Open License Value Five to 250
    > PCs Corporate, government As a Microsoft Software Advisor your
    > organization will be rewarded for its assistance to small and medium
    > business customers ("End User Customers") in assessing Microsoft
    > technology and acquiring Microsoft Open License Value Software.
    > Open License 6.0 Open Business
    > Open Volume Open Value *
    > Multi Year Open**
    > Open Subscription Licensing (OSL) ** Five or more PCs
    > Corporate, academic, charity, government Designed for customers who desire
    > an easy, one-time transaction process with the flexibility of acquiring
    > licenses from a broad reseller channel, with the ability to spread
    > payments annually.
    > Select License 6.0 Company-wide Option 250 or more PCs
    > Corporate, academic, charity, government Designed for medium, large, and
    > multinational organizations with mixed Microsoft license requirements,
    > decentralized purchasing, and the ability to forecast purchases.
    > Enterprise Agreement 6.0 Enterprise Agreement
    > Enterprise Subscription Agreement 250 or more PCs Corporate
    > Designed for medium, large, and multinational companies that are
    > interested in standardizing their enterprise and value the benefits of
    > centralized purchasing.
    > Academic Licensing All license types No minimum Academic
    > institutions of various sizes Four Volume Licensing solutions that are
    > designed to meet the specific needs of education institutions.
    >
    >
    > Independent Software Vendor Program
    > Microsoft Software License Type Customer Size Customer Type Customer
    > Profile
    > ISV Royalty Licensing Embedded License No Minimum Corporate
    > and Academic The Microsoft ISV Royalty License Agreement is a Microsoft
    > licensing program intended for Independent Software Vendors (ISVs) who
    > wish to distribute Microsoft software along with their commercial business
    > applications.
    >
    >
    > Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) Program
    > Microsoft Software License Type Customer Size Customer Type Customer
    > Profile
    > System Builder N/A No minimum Corporate Designed for system
    > builders who want to install OEM-licensed software on their systems.
    >
    >
    > Retail
    > Microsoft Software License Type Customer Size Customer Type Customer
    > Profile
    > Full Packaged Product No minimum Consumers Designed for
    > single-application Microsoft buyers.
    >
    >
    > "Alias" <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> wrote in message
    > news:O217CEVbFHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    >>
    >> "wayne" <komon@dgdg.sss> wrote in message
    >> news:SaCdnfGbrI8TRTXfRVn-oQ@comcast.com...
    >>> This is from Microsoft about OEM licenses
    >>>
    >>> The End User License Agreement (EULA) for OEM software, including
    >>> Windows XP, states that the software is licensed as a single integrated
    >>> product in connection with the hardware. However, it's important to
    >>> remember that the end user cannot see nor accept the electronic EULA
    >>> until the software is installed on a fully-assembled computer system.
    >>> So, even though the original OEM software unit may have been distributed
    >>> with a component, like a hard drive, it isn't until the software is
    >>> installed on a fully-assembled computer system that it becomes "married"
    >>> to the hardware.
    >>>
    >>> In general, OEM software may not be transferred from one system to
    >>> another system. However, the computer system can certainly be updated
    >>> with new components without the requirement of a new software license.
    >>> The only exception to this is the motherboard 1. If the motherboard is
    >>> replaced 2, the computer system is deemed "new" and a new license would
    >>> be required. Other PC components may be upgraded, including a hard
    >>> drive. Though if the hard drive 3 is replaced/upgraded, the operating
    >>> system must first be removed from the old hard drive. To restate: the
    >>> operating system is "married" to the computer system on which it is
    >>> originally installed.
    >>>
    >>> If you haven't already, please take a moment to review a comprehensive
    >>> group of OEM Licensing Questions and Answers which are specific to
    >>> system builders:
    >>> https://oem.microsoft.com/worldwide/514341.asp.
    >>>
    >>> Wayne
    >>
    >> What's that got to do with a person buying a *generic* OEM? My EULAs
    >> don't say "motherboard" in Spanish or English. They both say "hardware"
    >> and "computer" only. I am not a "system builder". With the way
    >> electronics goes today, a motherboard bought a year ago is out of date.
    >> For example, I have one sitting over there that will not take a graphic
    >> AGP 8x card, only 4x. Try to get a 4x graphic card nowadays. If one
    >> upgrades one's motherboard, it's still the same computer, now isn't it?
    >>
    >> Alias
    >>>
    >>> "Alias" <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> wrote in message
    >>> news:eCFUznNbFHA.3132@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    >>>>
    >>>> "wayne" <komon@dgdg.sss> wrote in message
    >>>> news:8MWdnVMQ6O5lNjrfRVn-2g@comcast.com...
    >>>>> no she probably can't register if it was an OEM copy the license is
    >>>>> tied
    >>>>> to the motherboard that is one of the reasons why OEM is cheaper
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Wayne
    >>>>
    >>>> Generic OEMs are NOT tied to the motherboard.
    >>>>
    >>>> Alias
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "Alias" <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> wrote in message
    >>>>> news:uwCUlrJbFHA.2420@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >>>>>> Ah the five second activation joys! Man, this is going to be a real
    >>>>>> PR
    >>>>>> headache for MS.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> LOL!
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Norm, you will have to use the phone in activation method.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Alias
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> "Norm" <Norm@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >>>>>> news:C38645E9-F7C8-4BB7-9E65-12D7CE51C986@microsoft.com...
    >>>>>>> This is on my daughters Computer but it refuses to let her
    >>>>>>> re-register.
    >>>>>>> Should she de-register first? and how does she do that?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  14. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    news:uudPx9VbFHA.2756@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    > In news:CbSdnc_k0c0tQzXfRVn-3g@comcast.com,
    > wayne <komon@dgdg.sss> typed:
    >
    >> nope the "computer is made up of several components MS allows you to
    >> change these components but they all connect to the motherboard. That is
    >> the one component that you cannot change with an OEM license.
    >
    >
    > What you can not change with an OEM license is the "computer." The
    > Microsoft OEM EULA does not precisely define exactly what constitutes the
    > "computer." Considering that the computer is the motherboard certainly
    > makes sense, and that's a view that's supported by many people, but it's
    > very far from clear that that's corect, or that that viewpoint would be
    > upheld in a court of law.
    >
    >
    >> You keep mentioning "generic"
    >>
    >> There is no such thing.
    >
    >
    > Of course there is. A "generic" OEM CD is one that has not been customized
    > by a particular OEM. It's identical to the Full retail CD except that it
    > can not do an upgrade installation. And its license of course is
    > different.
    >
    >
    >
    >> Certain large companies purchase a license
    >> from Microsoft to install XP on their computers. They can if they
    >> choose tie that copy to their hardware. All other versions are OEM
    >> and are supposed to be sold as part of a system
    >
    >
    > Not true. Generic OEM versions are widely available, and can legally be
    > bought without being sold as part of a system. The requirement is that
    > they have to be sold with a piece of non-peripheral hardware. Almost any
    > piece of hardware qualifies, and from a practical standpoint, anyone can
    > easily buy one of these at any time, by spending only an extra few dollars
    > for that piece of hardware.
    >
    >
    >> Perhaps this from the Microsoft web site will help to explain.
    >>
    >> I am pulling this from the system builder site
    >
    >
    > Yes, I'm aware of what it says on the System Builder site. However, this
    > is not the EULA, and doesn't bind the purchaser of an OEM version. Only
    > the EULA binds the purchaser, and the EULA does *not* define what
    > constitutes the "same computer."
    >
    > --
    > Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    > Please reply to the newsgroup

    Thank you Ken and may I add that in some countries, such as Spain, one does
    not need to buy any hardware to buy a generic OEM copy of XP.

    Alias
    >
    >
    >>
    >> Generally, you may upgrade or replace all of the hardware components
    >> on your customer's computer and the end user may maintain the license
    >> for the original Microsoft® OEM operating system software, with the
    >> exception of an upgrade or replacement of the motherboard.
    >> An upgrade of the motherboard is considered to result in a "new
    >> personal computer" to which Microsoft® OEM operating system software
    >> cannot be transferred from another computer.
    >
    >
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