CD Packaging

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

The packaging on CDs is really starting to tick me off. It started a few
years ago, when they stopped listing the times of the cuts on the back
of the package. Now, there are no times, and the titles and write-up are
so tiny and of a similar color to the background that you can't read
anything. Check out Queen Latifah's newest, "the dana owens album"
(sic). Dark brown background with tiny tan lettering.

Then there is the problem of getting into the damn thing. If you can get
the outer cello wrap off, you still aren't home free. They put at least
two tough, vinyl tapes over two edges of the plastic case, to make it
more difficult to open the case.

None of this nonsense would be effective in curbing theft, because you
could just razor through both the cello wrap and the tape, open the
case, and take the disc out. Does anyone remember the heady old first
days of CD, when they didn't have all this wrapping?

Last but not least, especially on DVD packaging, the disc is in a small
well, with a button protruding from the center hole and a rim all around
the edge. So you figure you will depress the button in the center to
release the disc, then lift it out by the edges where there are a few
fly-cut areas in the rim. BUT NO! There is a barrier all around, so
there is no place to get your fingers under, even in the fly-cut regions!

You know what I mean?

Gary Eickmeier
16 answers Last reply
More about packaging
  1. Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

    "Gary Eickmeier" <geickmei@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
    news:cl9tlb014kn@news2.newsguy.com...
    > The packaging on CDs is really starting to tick me off. It started a few
    > years ago, when they stopped listing the times of the cuts on the back of
    > the package. Now, there are no times, and the titles and write-up are so
    > tiny and of a similar color to the background that you can't read
    > anything. Check out Queen Latifah's newest, "the dana owens album" (sic).
    > Dark brown background with tiny tan lettering.
    >
    > Then there is the problem of getting into the damn thing. If you can get
    > the outer cello wrap off, you still aren't home free. They put at least
    > two tough, vinyl tapes over two edges of the plastic case, to make it more
    > difficult to open the case.
    >
    > None of this nonsense would be effective in curbing theft, because you
    > could just razor through both the cello wrap and the tape, open the case,
    > and take the disc out. Does anyone remember the heady old first days of
    > CD, when they didn't have all this wrapping?
    >
    > Last but not least, especially on DVD packaging, the disc is in a small
    > well, with a button protruding from the center hole and a rim all around
    > the edge. So you figure you will depress the button in the center to
    > release the disc, then lift it out by the edges where there are a few
    > fly-cut areas in the rim. BUT NO! There is a barrier all around, so there
    > is no place to get your fingers under, even in the fly-cut regions!
    >
    > You know what I mean?
    >
    > Gary Eickmeier

    I agree, the packaging and general design of the CD jewelcase leaves a lot
    to be desired. This frustration multiplies in radio stations where a
    considerable quantity of promotional CDs come in daily. However there is a
    special hand tool wrapper cutter available (don't know where from) that
    gives you a fighting chance. I think it needs a protest group before we
    will get a strip tab that really works? I also wonder how sight impaired
    folk get on reading the booklet print especially from the original LP's
    liner notes. One recent CD had the lyrics printed so small that I found a
    magnifying glass was needed.

    It does appear that all the R&D went into the player with the jewel case an
    afterthought.

    1. Booklet print size too small & booklet release poor.
    2. Weak cover hinge plus weak cover can crack in transit.
    3. Variable CD release design
    4. Shrink wrap/cellophane difficult to open.
    Any more?

    I know what you mean Gary and its all so unnecessary.

    Mike
  2. Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

    It sure is more difficult to get into them these days, but you have
    the thieves to thank for that. The color scheme may be just an
    artistic decision or it may be an attempt to make scanning it in a
    high resolution more difficult to help make pirated copies easier to
    identify. I know for sure that it helps to prevent shoplifting by
    increasing the time it takes to "lift" the item. That unnerves
    shoplifters and gives employees a longer window to catch them in. Once
    at your home, you've got five minutes to fight the wrappers! If
    everyone was honest and trustworthy, no one would have to lock their
    doors.
    -Bill
    www.uptownaudio.com
    Roanoke VA
    (540) 343-1250


    "Gary Eickmeier" <geickmei@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
    news:cl9tlb014kn@news2.newsguy.com...
    > The packaging on CDs is really starting to tick me off. It started a
    few
    > years ago, when they stopped listing the times of the cuts on the
    back
    > of the package. Now, there are no times, and the titles and write-up
    are
    > so tiny and of a similar color to the background that you can't read
    > anything. Check out Queen Latifah's newest, "the dana owens album"
    > (sic). Dark brown background with tiny tan lettering.
    >
    > Then there is the problem of getting into the damn thing. If you can
    get
    > the outer cello wrap off, you still aren't home free. They put at
    least
    > two tough, vinyl tapes over two edges of the plastic case, to make
    it
    > more difficult to open the case.
    >
    > None of this nonsense would be effective in curbing theft, because
    you
    > could just razor through both the cello wrap and the tape, open the
    > case, and take the disc out. Does anyone remember the heady old
    first
    > days of CD, when they didn't have all this wrapping?
    >
    > Last but not least, especially on DVD packaging, the disc is in a
    small
    > well, with a button protruding from the center hole and a rim all
    around
    > the edge. So you figure you will depress the button in the center to
    > release the disc, then lift it out by the edges where there are a
    few
    > fly-cut areas in the rim. BUT NO! There is a barrier all around, so
    > there is no place to get your fingers under, even in the fly-cut
    regions!
    >
    > You know what I mean?
    >
    > Gary Eickmeier
  3. Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

    You're not forgetting those heady old longboxes, are you? Especially those
    with the longbox wrapped in plastic, the cd wrapped in plastic, and those
    little adhesive tab seals on the cd box that you could never completely
    remove.
    "Gary Eickmeier" <geickmei@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
    news:cl9tlb014kn@news2.newsguy.com...
    > The packaging on CDs is really starting to tick me off. It started a few
    > years ago, when they stopped listing the times of the cuts on the back
    > of the package. Now, there are no times, and the titles and write-up are
    > so tiny and of a similar color to the background that you can't read
    > anything. Check out Queen Latifah's newest, "the dana owens album"
    > (sic). Dark brown background with tiny tan lettering.
    >
    > Then there is the problem of getting into the damn thing. If you can get
    > the outer cello wrap off, you still aren't home free. They put at least
    > two tough, vinyl tapes over two edges of the plastic case, to make it
    > more difficult to open the case.
    >
    > None of this nonsense would be effective in curbing theft, because you
    > could just razor through both the cello wrap and the tape, open the
    > case, and take the disc out. Does anyone remember the heady old first
    > days of CD, when they didn't have all this wrapping?
    >
    > Last but not least, especially on DVD packaging, the disc is in a small
    > well, with a button protruding from the center hole and a rim all around
    > the edge. So you figure you will depress the button in the center to
    > release the disc, then lift it out by the edges where there are a few
    > fly-cut areas in the rim. BUT NO! There is a barrier all around, so
    > there is no place to get your fingers under, even in the fly-cut regions!
    >
    > You know what I mean?
    >
    > Gary Eickmeier
  4. Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

    tcassette wrote:
    > You're not forgetting those heady old longboxes, are you? Especially those
    > with the longbox wrapped in plastic, the cd wrapped in plastic, and those
    > little adhesive tab seals on the cd box that you could never completely
    > remove.

    Oh yeah - those longboxes that were meant to make the CDs more
    prominent, or to make them as tall as an LP - or something. But what I
    was referring to was the first days of CD, when they came in naked jewel
    boxes - not even any cello wrap. They lined up in their little bins like
    rows of little jewels, and there were so few of them that you bought
    every new one that came out - except the rock 'n roll junk.

    Anyone remember the gold CDs? Was that just a Mobile Fidelity gig?

    Gary Eickmeier
  5. Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

    Chesky also produced a few gold CDs. I have the Sibelius 2nd symphony
    on a gold CD.


    ---MIKE---
  6. Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

    Gold CDs were produced with care by CBS (now Sony) and DCC along with Mobile
    Fidelity from original master tapes. You can find many on Ebay. Other less
    than major labels (usually non-U.S.) produced a few "gold" CDs with varying
    quality.
    "Gary Eickmeier" <geickmei@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
    news:cldqri0ibn@news3.newsguy.com...
    > tcassette wrote:
    > > You're not forgetting those heady old longboxes, are you? Especially
    those
    > > with the longbox wrapped in plastic, the cd wrapped in plastic, and
    those
    > > little adhesive tab seals on the cd box that you could never completely
    > > remove.
    >
    > Oh yeah - those longboxes that were meant to make the CDs more
    > prominent, or to make them as tall as an LP - or something. But what I
    > was referring to was the first days of CD, when they came in naked jewel
    > boxes - not even any cello wrap. They lined up in their little bins like
    > rows of little jewels, and there were so few of them that you bought
    > every new one that came out - except the rock 'n roll junk.
    >
    > Anyone remember the gold CDs? Was that just a Mobile Fidelity gig?
    >
    > Gary Eickmeier
  7. Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

    Gary Eickmeier <geickmei@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message news:<cldqri0ibn@news3.newsguy.com>...
    > tcassette wrote:
    > > You're not forgetting those heady old longboxes, are you? Especially those
    > > with the longbox wrapped in plastic, the cd wrapped in plastic, and those
    > > little adhesive tab seals on the cd box that you could never completely
    > > remove.
    >
    > Oh yeah - those longboxes that were meant to make the CDs more
    > prominent, or to make them as tall as an LP - or something. But what I
    > was referring to was the first days of CD, when they came in naked jewel
    > boxes - not even any cello wrap. They lined up in their little bins like
    > rows of little jewels, and there were so few of them that you bought
    > every new one that came out - except the rock 'n roll junk.
    >
    > Anyone remember the gold CDs? Was that just a Mobile Fidelity gig?
    >
    > Gary Eickmeier

    Speaking of old CDs, I found an old DUAL CD 120 player at a garage
    sale today. This is a first generation CD player made in October,
    1983. Surprisingly, it plays fine and works ok, even the cool door
    that swallows the CD works fine. This must have cost a small fortune
    in 1983. I read somewhere that only 30,000 CD players were sold in USA
    in 1983. Boy, we've come a long way!
  8. Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

    "Gary Eickmeier" <geickmei@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
    news:cldqri0ibn@news3.newsguy.com...

    > Anyone remember the gold CDs? Was that just a Mobile Fidelity gig?
    >
    I have several Sony's, and there are others here-
    http://wholelottacds.home.att.net/24k_gold_cds.htm
  9. Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

    Dan Busetti wrote:

    > Speaking of old CDs, I found an old DUAL CD 120 player at a garage
    > sale today. This is a first generation CD player made in October,
    > 1983. Surprisingly, it plays fine and works ok, even the cool door
    > that swallows the CD works fine. This must have cost a small fortune
    > in 1983. I read somewhere that only 30,000 CD players were sold in USA
    > in 1983. Boy, we've come a long way!

    I've got a Sony 101 that I bought used for $500 in about '84. It was
    $1000 new. Not using it, but it works.

    Gary Eickmeier
  10. Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

    "Mike Gilmour" ike@tfjazz.freeserve.co.uk wrote:


    >"Gary Eickmeier" <geickmei@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
    >news:cl9tlb014kn@news2.newsguy.com...
    >> The packaging on CDs is really starting to tick me off. It started a few
    >> years ago, when they stopped listing the times of the cuts on the back of
    >> the package. Now, there are no times, and the titles and write-up are so
    >> tiny and of a similar color to the background that you can't read
    >> anything. Check out Queen Latifah's newest, "the dana owens album" (sic).
    >> Dark brown background with tiny tan lettering.
    >>
    >> Then there is the problem of getting into the damn thing. If you can get
    >> the outer cello wrap off, you still aren't home free. They put at least
    >> two tough, vinyl tapes over two edges of the plastic case, to make it more
    >> difficult to open the case.
    >>
    >> None of this nonsense would be effective in curbing theft, because you
    >> could just razor through both the cello wrap and the tape, open the case,
    >> and take the disc out. Does anyone remember the heady old first days of
    >> CD, when they didn't have all this wrapping?
    >>
    >> Last but not least, especially on DVD packaging, the disc is in a small
    >> well, with a button protruding from the center hole and a rim all around
    >> the edge. So you figure you will depress the button in the center to
    >> release the disc, then lift it out by the edges where there are a few
    >> fly-cut areas in the rim. BUT NO! There is a barrier all around, so there
    >> is no place to get your fingers under, even in the fly-cut regions!
    >>
    >> You know what I mean?
    >>
    >> Gary Eickmeier
    >
    >I agree, the packaging and general design of the CD jewelcase leaves a lot
    >to be desired. This frustration multiplies in radio stations where a
    >considerable quantity of promotional CDs come in daily. However there is a
    >special hand tool wrapper cutter available (don't know where from) that
    >gives you a fighting chance. I think it needs a protest group before we
    >will get a strip tab that really works? I also wonder how sight impaired
    >folk get on reading the booklet print especially from the original LP's
    >liner notes. One recent CD had the lyrics printed so small that I found a
    >magnifying glass was needed.
    >
    >It does appear that all the R&D went into the player with the jewel case an
    >afterthought.
    >
    >1. Booklet print size too small & booklet release poor.
    >2. Weak cover hinge plus weak cover can crack in transit.
    >3. Variable CD release design
    >4. Shrink wrap/cellophane difficult to open.
    >Any more?
    >
    >I know what you mean Gary and its all so unnecessary.
    >
    >Mike

    I've tired of hearing all the complaints about cd/dvd packaging with never a
    comment about the advantages such as a much more spine lable, a locking lid
    that generally prevents the disc from falling out like lps would so often do,
    transportable wallet devices that enable car or portable use and a useful size
    that allows significant space savings for a like number of recordings and a
    program content that allows a single or perhaps 2-disc compilation with a given
    pop/jazz/rock/zydeco/singer that contains significant program material on a
    single disc.

    As for cover art ..... because of the above advantages it is difficult to
    re-reproduce original album cover art for re-issues of lps. However, that was
    also true for cassettes and nobody seemed to complain all that loudly about
    that.

    But I also remember that IF the cover art were THE item with the most interest
    I'd agree that complaints MIGHT be defensible but quite frankly I'm having
    trouble reading the cover art on lps and laser discs as original cover art too.
    I can easily deal with more than one magnifying glass.

    Even so when Sound & Vision was introduced at the CES some 5-years ago one of
    the party favors at the CES Luncheon was a wonderful cd/dvd edge slitter that
    I'm surprised has never been introduced as a commercial product. Even though I
    gave away my 2 samples I now use a cheap ACE Hardware plastic box cutter to
    deal with the edge tape and shrink wrap.

    Another legacy item we all love to complain about is the rca connector. But
    frankly the lowly rca helped reduce initial cost of audio equipment
    significantly AND the universal nature was certainly one of its MOST useful
    attributes.

    Sure its not suitable for many professional applications. But I have an
    8-channel main system a 6 channel bedroom system and car/home product lab
    facilities that use rcas extensively because I test home/car products and in
    15+ years of evaluation/music/audio enjoyment I've had to replace rca cables
    (the latest only wto weeks ago which was why I thought about it) perhaps a half
    dozen times and had to repair jacks only twice.

    And when it gets right down to it, now that I have had carpal tunnel surgery
    and suffer from diabaetic retinopathy in my hands and forearms I've learned to
    HATE BNC connectors because they are often difficult to lock and unlock in hard
    to reach places.

    IMO of the technology cycle were run backwards we'd be complaining that we need
    more space to store those pesky lps, that we couldn't edit or program ourselves
    to re-order the tracks, that the spines are often difficult to read and what a
    waste of production cost on all that phoney cover art :-)

    Of course, I've twisted Mr Eickmeiers, perhaps legitimate, complaints about the
    faults of current packaging, into a play on the advantages of current media.
    But I think it all fits into a more complete look at the issue.
  11. Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

    Nousaine <nousaine@aol.com> wrote:

    > Even so when Sound & Vision was introduced at the CES some 5-years ago one of
    > the party favors at the CES Luncheon was a wonderful cd/dvd edge slitter that
    > I'm surprised has never been introduced as a commercial product. Even though I
    > gave away my 2 samples I now use a cheap ACE Hardware plastic box cutter to
    > deal with the edge tape and shrink wrap.


    Tower Records sells a small, cheap CD slitter at its checkout counters.
    At least, they did when I was there last week.
  12. Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

    Steven Sullivan wrote:

    > Nousaine <nousaine@aol.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Even so when Sound & Vision was introduced at the CES some 5-years ago one of
    >>the party favors at the CES Luncheon was a wonderful cd/dvd edge slitter that
    >>I'm surprised has never been introduced as a commercial product. Even though I
    >>gave away my 2 samples I now use a cheap ACE Hardware plastic box cutter to
    >>deal with the edge tape and shrink wrap.
    >
    >
    >
    > Tower Records sells a small, cheap CD slitter at its checkout counters.
    > At least, they did when I was there last week.

    Slitting it open doesn't satisfy me. I want to remove that stupid edge
    tape, not crack it open.

    Gary Eickmeier
  13. Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

    "Steven Sullivan" <ssully@panix.com> wrote in message
    news:clmo620hgp@news2.newsguy.com...
    > Nousaine <nousaine@aol.com> wrote:
    >
    >> Even so when Sound & Vision was introduced at the CES some 5-years ago
    >> one of
    >> the party favors at the CES Luncheon was a wonderful cd/dvd edge slitter
    >> that
    >> I'm surprised has never been introduced as a commercial product. Even
    >> though I
    >> gave away my 2 samples I now use a cheap ACE Hardware plastic box cutter
    >> to
    >> deal with the edge tape and shrink wrap.
    >
    >
    > Tower Records sells a small, cheap CD slitter at its checkout counters.
    > At least, they did when I was there last week.
    >

    Cutting through factory stickers and shrink wrap never presented a problem
    to me, it's the complete and clean removal of the sticker and which
    particularly nasty on DVDs where the underbelly is not like that of a jewel
    case.
  14. Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

    >geickmei@tampabay.rr.com

    >Slitting it open doesn't satisfy me. I want to remove that stupid edge
    >tape, not crack it open.
    >

    It isn't perfect, but I have the greatest success doing that when I unhinge,
    and then separate, the two halves of the jewel case *before* taking off the
    plastic strip on top.

    I start with the bottom hinge, move a little tape, then the second hinge
    releases instantly. Don't use too much pressure. Let there be tension between
    hands/halves. Once I've got the halves separated, one half in each hand, I pull
    gently on one half to remove the plastic strip from the other half.

    Then I very carefully strip the whole piece of tape off the half of the jewel
    box that still has it.

    I hope that's understandable. I think once you get the halves separated, you'll
    know intuitively what to do.
  15. Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

    Norman M. Schwartz wrote:

    > Cutting through factory stickers and shrink wrap never presented a problem
    > to me, it's the complete and clean removal of the sticker and which
    > particularly nasty on DVDs where the underbelly is not like that of a jewel
    > case.

    Norman -

    Could you please re-write that? I just can't decipher it.

    Gary Eickmeier
  16. Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

    Gary Eickmeier <geickmei@tampabay.rr.com> wrote:
    > Steven Sullivan wrote:

    > > Nousaine <nousaine@aol.com> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>Even so when Sound & Vision was introduced at the CES some 5-years ago one of
    > >>the party favors at the CES Luncheon was a wonderful cd/dvd edge slitter that
    > >>I'm surprised has never been introduced as a commercial product. Even though I
    > >>gave away my 2 samples I now use a cheap ACE Hardware plastic box cutter to
    > >>deal with the edge tape and shrink wrap.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Tower Records sells a small, cheap CD slitter at its checkout counters.
    > > At least, they did when I was there last week.

    > Slitting it open doesn't satisfy me. I want to remove that stupid edge
    > tape, not crack it open.

    <shrug> never found removing the tape to be a big deal...but I suppose
    a small razor scraper-- the kind often sold from a bucket near the
    checkout counter at Home Depot and Lowe's, used for scraping paint off windows --
    would do the job nicely.


    --
    -S
    Your a boring little troll. How does it feel? Go blow your bad breath elsewhere.
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