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Backup HD contents to CD

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Anonymous
June 11, 2005 12:35:02 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Hi All,
After doing two successful clean installs on my computer I have finally
realized the importance of backing all my files and settings.
I would like to backup my harddrive to a Cd but being somewhat of a computer
novice, my backup knowledge is very limited to say the least. I would
appreciate if someone would kindly show me how to go about doing this.
Thank you in advance.
Franktee

More about : backup contents

Anonymous
June 11, 2005 5:03:58 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Considering that Hardrives are usually this day of age over 1GB and CD-ROMS
hold at most 710MB not gonna happen. A DVD holds 4GB. But really what you
want to do is back up your important stuff. Settings no. What you want is
a drive image. But if you take a drive image of a 200GB drive you''ll need
pretty close to a 200GB drive to store it on.

--
George Hester
_______________________________
"Franktee" <Franktee@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:3B442D4A-4587-4E4C-A5F2-55E1B6CC7984@microsoft.com...
> Hi All,
> After doing two successful clean installs on my computer I have finally
> realized the importance of backing all my files and settings.
> I would like to backup my harddrive to a Cd but being somewhat of a
computer
> novice, my backup knowledge is very limited to say the least. I would
> appreciate if someone would kindly show me how to go about doing this.
> Thank you in advance.
> Franktee
June 11, 2005 7:59:09 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Franktee wrote:

> Hi All,
> After doing two successful clean installs on my computer I have finally
> realized the importance of backing all my files and settings.
> I would like to backup my harddrive to a Cd but being somewhat of a computer
> novice, my backup knowledge is very limited to say the least. I would
> appreciate if someone would kindly show me how to go about doing this.
> Thank you in advance.
> Franktee

There are at least several approaches. One is to use an imaging
program. This makes an exact image of the partition which can be saved
on CD/DVD or to another drive - internal or external. [In general there
is little value in created a backup on another internal drive. Best is
to backup to an external USB 2.0 or firewire drive]. Restores can be
done of the entire partition or individual files / folders. These work
well and make it easy to recover from a drive crash. Examples of this are:

Norton Ghost 9.0
Drive Image 7 (still available in some places; the maker - Powerquest -
was bought out by Symantec and is now Norton Ghost 9 with some changes)
Acronis True Image
Image for Windows (Terabyte Unlimited)
BootItNg (Terabyte Unlimited)

The second option is a traditional backup program such as Stompsoft's
Backup My PC. This is an excellent tool. It is the evolution of
ntbackup. There are other good backup programs out there as well. This
can do a complete backup or backup individual files and folders to DVD/CD.

Whatever backup solution you choose make sure to test it out so you know
what it does and how to use it to recover.

--
Rock
MS MVP Windows - Shell/User
Related resources
June 11, 2005 9:35:54 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Franktee" <Franktee@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:3B442D4A-4587-4E4C-A5F2-55E1B6CC7984@microsoft.com...
> Hi All,
> After doing two successful clean installs on my computer I have finally
> realized the importance of backing all my files and settings.
> I would like to backup my harddrive to a Cd but being somewhat of a
computer
> novice, my backup knowledge is very limited to say the least. I would
> appreciate if someone would kindly show me how to go about doing this.
> Thank you in advance.
> Franktee
I would recommend using Acronis True Image which backs up your system or
parts of it.
It allows you to chose breaking down the data into packages which are
suitable for creating a CD .
In my case I backup my own data monthly to my old PC and backup the system
every 6 months unless I have had a large change.
I then download the backups to a CD
Blair
Anonymous
June 11, 2005 9:35:55 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

> I would recommend using Acronis True Image which backs up your system or
> parts of it.

This software does not function properly for everyone. My system met all
the requirements to run it and it still DID NOT function properly. I could
not get a whole lot of help from tech support either except them telling me
to invest in a digital camera so I could take pics of my progress to send
them. I must have wasted at least 100 discs trying to get that stupid thing
to work and FINALLY gave up. SO BEWARE if you decide to try this software.
I would suggest going to their support base at
http://www.acronis.com/enterprise/support/forum/
and looking at all the problems people are having first. Just my 2 cents.
They have a good return policy :)  if that means anything to ya. I'll
bet ya though if they had to pay for everyones CD-R's and DVD-R's that get
wasted, then they would change their advertising on their product.

BUYER BEWARE on this product.

Lonnie
Anonymous
June 11, 2005 12:41:28 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Franktee" <Franktee@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:3B442D4A-4587-4E4C-A5F2-55E1B6CC7984@microsoft.com...
> Hi All,
> After doing two successful clean installs on my computer I have finally
> realized the importance of backing all my files and settings.
> I would like to backup my harddrive to a Cd

Ok, it's quite possible to backup an HD to CD but it depends how much data
you have. It might need a lot of CDR's. Go to My Computer and right click on
C:. Select "Properties" and see what the used space is. Lets say that its
8GBytes... A CD can typically hold 650-700 MBytes so Divide 8000 by say 650
to get about 13. So it could take 13 CDR to make a full backup. In practice
it will take less than that because the data is compressed. Even 8 CD is a
lot to burn. The same amount of data would fit on 2 DVD.

The best solution is to get a second hard drive (external USB 2.0 perhaps)
AND an internal DVD writer. Use a program like Norton Ghost to backup C: to
the new hard drive. Have Ghost split the image into 600MByte chunks. That
way you can choose to save those chunks later to either 8 CDR or 2 DVD.

I set up Drive Image (which is now integrated into Ghost) to backup to the
second HD every night. Overkill perhaps but it works and it involves almost
no user interaction - I don't have to remember to do anything. It even sends
me an email to so I don't have to look for the log file to see if had a
problem.
Anonymous
June 11, 2005 9:29:11 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

I have used TrueImage for the past 3 years and have had no problems. It (TI) is easy to use and it works.

--
Just my 2¢ worth,
Jeff
__________in response to__________

"Lonnie" <Lonnie@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message news:7434A5F3-62D7-46C5-85EC-120FF8794E05@microsoft.com...
|> I would recommend using Acronis True Image which backs up your system or
| > parts of it.
|
| This software does not function properly for everyone. My system met all
| the requirements to run it and it still DID NOT function properly. I could
| not get a whole lot of help from tech support either except them telling me
| to invest in a digital camera so I could take pics of my progress to send
| them. I must have wasted at least 100 discs trying to get that stupid thing
| to work and FINALLY gave up. SO BEWARE if you decide to try this software.
| I would suggest going to their support base at
| http://www.acronis.com/enterprise/support/forum/
| and looking at all the problems people are having first. Just my 2 cents.
| They have a good return policy :)  if that means anything to ya. I'll
| bet ya though if they had to pay for everyones CD-R's and DVD-R's that get
| wasted, then they would change their advertising on their product.
|
| BUYER BEWARE on this product.
|
| Lonnie
|
|
Anonymous
June 12, 2005 9:49:11 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Imaging software does not copy empty space on any partition on a hard drive.
Nor does it file copy file slack (see Google for this), or the hibernation
file, or the swapfile. Further, an image file has some native compression.
Further, there is usually an option for futher compression of the image
file. The resulting image file or files is/are a result after all this,
which may be very much smaller than the original hard drive capacity.

A clone (which is entirely different from an image), may need the same
capacity hard drive as a requirement before the cloning software will begin.
Some cloning software make allowances for source hard drive empty space, and
don't make this a requirement.

"George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:o N4H1LkbFHA.348@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Considering that Hardrives are usually this day of age over 1GB and
CD-ROMS
> hold at most 710MB not gonna happen. A DVD holds 4GB. But really what
you
> want to do is back up your important stuff. Settings no. What you want
is
> a drive image. But if you take a drive image of a 200GB drive you''ll
need
> pretty close to a 200GB drive to store it on.
>
> --
> George Hester
> _______________________________
> "Franktee" <Franktee@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:3B442D4A-4587-4E4C-A5F2-55E1B6CC7984@microsoft.com...
> > Hi All,
> > After doing two successful clean installs on my computer I have finally
> > realized the importance of backing all my files and settings.
> > I would like to backup my harddrive to a Cd but being somewhat of a
> computer
> > novice, my backup knowledge is very limited to say the least. I would
> > appreciate if someone would kindly show me how to go about doing this.
> > Thank you in advance.
> > Franktee
>
Anonymous
June 12, 2005 10:17:29 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Rock" <rock@mail.nospam.net> wrote in message
news:uDUBZSnbFHA.3416@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Franktee wrote:
>
> > Hi All,
> > After doing two successful clean installs on my computer I have finally
> > realized the importance of backing all my files and settings.
> > I would like to backup my harddrive to a Cd but being somewhat of a
computer
> > novice, my backup knowledge is very limited to say the least. I would
> > appreciate if someone would kindly show me how to go about doing this.
> > Thank you in advance.
> > Franktee
>
> There are at least several approaches. One is to use an imaging
> program. This makes an exact image of the partition which can be saved
> on CD/DVD or to another drive - internal or external. [In general there
> is little value in created a backup on another internal drive. Best is
> to backup to an external USB 2.0 or firewire drive]. Restores can be
> done of the entire partition or individual files / folders. These work
> well and make it easy to recover from a drive crash. Examples of this are:
>
> Norton Ghost 9.0
> Drive Image 7 (still available in some places; the maker - Powerquest -
> was bought out by Symantec and is now Norton Ghost 9 with some changes)
> Acronis True Image
> Image for Windows (Terabyte Unlimited)
> BootItNg (Terabyte Unlimited)
>
> The second option is a traditional backup program such as Stompsoft's
> Backup My PC. This is an excellent tool. It is the evolution of
> ntbackup. There are other good backup programs out there as well. This
> can do a complete backup or backup individual files and folders to DVD/CD.
>
> Whatever backup solution you choose make sure to test it out so you know
> what it does and how to use it to recover.
>
> --
> Rock
> MS MVP Windows - Shell/User
>

The scary part is doing the first trial recovery. You don't know if it will
work, and your original installation will be wiped. And, sad to say,
sometimes is won't work. Reasons vary from the hardware media not
accessible in the recovery environment, multiple media verification failure
(was common among tape drive backups) and now attributable to multiple
CD/DVD media, media corruption, network environment not re-creatable in the
restoration environment. You won't know this until after you or the
recovery program has made a recovery target barring the network environment
which you will know in advance, wiping the hard drive first. The recovery
program will not continue until this target is available.

As a further backup, a clone (not an image) is suggested on a removable ide
hard drive. Just clone it back to its orignal source. Or use it just like
the original hard drive by putting it on the ide ribbon cable of the former
hard drive ribbon location. If you buy a new hard drive, buy two, and use
one for a clone target. Image recovery is much faster, so I tend to rely on
that myself, but still maintain a clone. Overkill to some, but makes a
whole lotta sense to me.
Anonymous
June 12, 2005 11:31:41 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Data Recovery can be a problem. I can remember allot of times in
Corporate work where a tape backup failed on us. Just because a
backup or image completes doesn't always guarantee recovery. I
also run a Verify pass on the image to raise the confidence level in
it. Since I use Drive Image, I also use Image Explorer which allows
me to actually explore into the image set and examine folders/files.
I've don't use incremental backups/images since I don't want to
have to keep Parent/Child data sets. Except for personal data loss,
there's nothing worse than having an Image or Backup that isn't
valid or is somehow corrupted. That issue, is my main qualm with
System Restore - no validation or way to verify that the points are
OK and can be counted on when needed.


"Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
news:ubmnTB0bFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> "Rock" <rock@mail.nospam.net> wrote in message
> news:uDUBZSnbFHA.3416@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> Franktee wrote:
>>
>> > Hi All,
>> > After doing two successful clean installs on my computer I have finally
>> > realized the importance of backing all my files and settings.
>> > I would like to backup my harddrive to a Cd but being somewhat of a
> computer
>> > novice, my backup knowledge is very limited to say the least. I would
>> > appreciate if someone would kindly show me how to go about doing this.
>> > Thank you in advance.
>> > Franktee
>>
>> There are at least several approaches. One is to use an imaging
>> program. This makes an exact image of the partition which can be saved
>> on CD/DVD or to another drive - internal or external. [In general there
>> is little value in created a backup on another internal drive. Best is
>> to backup to an external USB 2.0 or firewire drive]. Restores can be
>> done of the entire partition or individual files / folders. These work
>> well and make it easy to recover from a drive crash. Examples of this
>> are:
>>
>> Norton Ghost 9.0
>> Drive Image 7 (still available in some places; the maker - Powerquest -
>> was bought out by Symantec and is now Norton Ghost 9 with some changes)
>> Acronis True Image
>> Image for Windows (Terabyte Unlimited)
>> BootItNg (Terabyte Unlimited)
>>
>> The second option is a traditional backup program such as Stompsoft's
>> Backup My PC. This is an excellent tool. It is the evolution of
>> ntbackup. There are other good backup programs out there as well. This
>> can do a complete backup or backup individual files and folders to
>> DVD/CD.
>>
>> Whatever backup solution you choose make sure to test it out so you know
>> what it does and how to use it to recover.
>>
>> --
>> Rock
>> MS MVP Windows - Shell/User
>>
>
> The scary part is doing the first trial recovery. You don't know if it
> will
> work, and your original installation will be wiped. And, sad to say,
> sometimes is won't work. Reasons vary from the hardware media not
> accessible in the recovery environment, multiple media verification
> failure
> (was common among tape drive backups) and now attributable to multiple
> CD/DVD media, media corruption, network environment not re-creatable in
> the
> restoration environment. You won't know this until after you or the
> recovery program has made a recovery target barring the network
> environment
> which you will know in advance, wiping the hard drive first. The recovery
> program will not continue until this target is available.
>
> As a further backup, a clone (not an image) is suggested on a removable
> ide
> hard drive. Just clone it back to its orignal source. Or use it just
> like
> the original hard drive by putting it on the ide ribbon cable of the
> former
> hard drive ribbon location. If you buy a new hard drive, buy two, and use
> one for a clone target. Image recovery is much faster, so I tend to rely
> on
> that myself, but still maintain a clone. Overkill to some, but makes a
> whole lotta sense to me.
>
>
Anonymous
June 12, 2005 3:15:00 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

And the other thing about System Restore that I didn't like is the one time
I tried it it did nothing but stop the system from booting. Hey it wasn't
any good before the System Restore but it was a hellofa lot worse after
doing it. All because of a bunch of XP Plus free d/ls from Microsoft and
their IE security updates. I agree we need to have a way to validate System
Restore points as we go.

--
George Hester
_______________________________
"R. McCarty" <PcEngWork-NoSpam_@mindspring.com> wrote in message
news:o JnrOJ0bFHA.2128@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Data Recovery can be a problem. I can remember allot of times in
> Corporate work where a tape backup failed on us. Just because a
> backup or image completes doesn't always guarantee recovery. I
> also run a Verify pass on the image to raise the confidence level in
> it. Since I use Drive Image, I also use Image Explorer which allows
> me to actually explore into the image set and examine folders/files.
> I've don't use incremental backups/images since I don't want to
> have to keep Parent/Child data sets. Except for personal data loss,
> there's nothing worse than having an Image or Backup that isn't
> valid or is somehow corrupted. That issue, is my main qualm with
> System Restore - no validation or way to verify that the points are
> OK and can be counted on when needed.
>
>
> "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
> news:ubmnTB0bFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > "Rock" <rock@mail.nospam.net> wrote in message
> > news:uDUBZSnbFHA.3416@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> >> Franktee wrote:
> >>
> >> > Hi All,
> >> > After doing two successful clean installs on my computer I have
finally
> >> > realized the importance of backing all my files and settings.
> >> > I would like to backup my harddrive to a Cd but being somewhat of a
> > computer
> >> > novice, my backup knowledge is very limited to say the least. I would
> >> > appreciate if someone would kindly show me how to go about doing
this.
> >> > Thank you in advance.
> >> > Franktee
> >>
> >> There are at least several approaches. One is to use an imaging
> >> program. This makes an exact image of the partition which can be saved
> >> on CD/DVD or to another drive - internal or external. [In general
there
> >> is little value in created a backup on another internal drive. Best is
> >> to backup to an external USB 2.0 or firewire drive]. Restores can be
> >> done of the entire partition or individual files / folders. These work
> >> well and make it easy to recover from a drive crash. Examples of this
> >> are:
> >>
> >> Norton Ghost 9.0
> >> Drive Image 7 (still available in some places; the maker - Powerquest -
> >> was bought out by Symantec and is now Norton Ghost 9 with some changes)
> >> Acronis True Image
> >> Image for Windows (Terabyte Unlimited)
> >> BootItNg (Terabyte Unlimited)
> >>
> >> The second option is a traditional backup program such as Stompsoft's
> >> Backup My PC. This is an excellent tool. It is the evolution of
> >> ntbackup. There are other good backup programs out there as well.
This
> >> can do a complete backup or backup individual files and folders to
> >> DVD/CD.
> >>
> >> Whatever backup solution you choose make sure to test it out so you
know
> >> what it does and how to use it to recover.
> >>
> >> --
> >> Rock
> >> MS MVP Windows - Shell/User
> >>
> >
> > The scary part is doing the first trial recovery. You don't know if it
> > will
> > work, and your original installation will be wiped. And, sad to say,
> > sometimes is won't work. Reasons vary from the hardware media not
> > accessible in the recovery environment, multiple media verification
> > failure
> > (was common among tape drive backups) and now attributable to multiple
> > CD/DVD media, media corruption, network environment not re-creatable in
> > the
> > restoration environment. You won't know this until after you or the
> > recovery program has made a recovery target barring the network
> > environment
> > which you will know in advance, wiping the hard drive first. The
recovery
> > program will not continue until this target is available.
> >
> > As a further backup, a clone (not an image) is suggested on a removable
> > ide
> > hard drive. Just clone it back to its orignal source. Or use it just
> > like
> > the original hard drive by putting it on the ide ribbon cable of the
> > former
> > hard drive ribbon location. If you buy a new hard drive, buy two, and
use
> > one for a clone target. Image recovery is much faster, so I tend to
rely
> > on
> > that myself, but still maintain a clone. Overkill to some, but makes a
> > whole lotta sense to me.
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
June 12, 2005 3:15:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:u5Ht6F2bFHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> And the other thing about System Restore that I didn't like is the one
> time
> I tried it it did nothing but stop the system from booting. Hey it wasn't
> any good before the System Restore but it was a hellofa lot worse after
> doing it. All because of a bunch of XP Plus free d/ls from Microsoft and
> their IE security updates. I agree we need to have a way to validate
> System
> Restore points as we go.
>
> --
> George Hester

I have found system restore to be a last ditch effort before I reinstall
windows. It rarely works as advertised. Even when it seems work I usually
get the computer back with complaints of some applications not working
right, or general complaints of "something's not right". For an
inexperienced user it might be useful if they created a restore point
immediately before installing a program or driver. It may be easier for them
to do a system restore rather than an uninstall or rollback if something
went drastically wrong. Also a lot of malware hides in system restore files.
It is a good idea that is poorly implemented in my opinion.

Kerry

> _______________________________
> "R. McCarty" <PcEngWork-NoSpam_@mindspring.com> wrote in message
> news:o JnrOJ0bFHA.2128@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>> Data Recovery can be a problem. I can remember allot of times in
>> Corporate work where a tape backup failed on us. Just because a
>> backup or image completes doesn't always guarantee recovery. I
>> also run a Verify pass on the image to raise the confidence level in
>> it. Since I use Drive Image, I also use Image Explorer which allows
>> me to actually explore into the image set and examine folders/files.
>> I've don't use incremental backups/images since I don't want to
>> have to keep Parent/Child data sets. Except for personal data loss,
>> there's nothing worse than having an Image or Backup that isn't
>> valid or is somehow corrupted. That issue, is my main qualm with
>> System Restore - no validation or way to verify that the points are
>> OK and can be counted on when needed.
>>
>>
>> "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
>> news:ubmnTB0bFHA.2960@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> > "Rock" <rock@mail.nospam.net> wrote in message
>> > news:uDUBZSnbFHA.3416@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> >> Franktee wrote:
>> >>
>> >> > Hi All,
>> >> > After doing two successful clean installs on my computer I have
> finally
>> >> > realized the importance of backing all my files and settings.
>> >> > I would like to backup my harddrive to a Cd but being somewhat of a
>> > computer
>> >> > novice, my backup knowledge is very limited to say the least. I
>> >> > would
>> >> > appreciate if someone would kindly show me how to go about doing
> this.
>> >> > Thank you in advance.
>> >> > Franktee
>> >>
>> >> There are at least several approaches. One is to use an imaging
>> >> program. This makes an exact image of the partition which can be
>> >> saved
>> >> on CD/DVD or to another drive - internal or external. [In general
> there
>> >> is little value in created a backup on another internal drive. Best is
>> >> to backup to an external USB 2.0 or firewire drive]. Restores can be
>> >> done of the entire partition or individual files / folders. These work
>> >> well and make it easy to recover from a drive crash. Examples of this
>> >> are:
>> >>
>> >> Norton Ghost 9.0
>> >> Drive Image 7 (still available in some places; the maker -
>> >> Powerquest -
>> >> was bought out by Symantec and is now Norton Ghost 9 with some
>> >> changes)
>> >> Acronis True Image
>> >> Image for Windows (Terabyte Unlimited)
>> >> BootItNg (Terabyte Unlimited)
>> >>
>> >> The second option is a traditional backup program such as Stompsoft's
>> >> Backup My PC. This is an excellent tool. It is the evolution of
>> >> ntbackup. There are other good backup programs out there as well.
> This
>> >> can do a complete backup or backup individual files and folders to
>> >> DVD/CD.
>> >>
>> >> Whatever backup solution you choose make sure to test it out so you
> know
>> >> what it does and how to use it to recover.
>> >>
>> >> --
>> >> Rock
>> >> MS MVP Windows - Shell/User
>> >>
>> >
>> > The scary part is doing the first trial recovery. You don't know if it
>> > will
>> > work, and your original installation will be wiped. And, sad to say,
>> > sometimes is won't work. Reasons vary from the hardware media not
>> > accessible in the recovery environment, multiple media verification
>> > failure
>> > (was common among tape drive backups) and now attributable to multiple
>> > CD/DVD media, media corruption, network environment not re-creatable in
>> > the
>> > restoration environment. You won't know this until after you or the
>> > recovery program has made a recovery target barring the network
>> > environment
>> > which you will know in advance, wiping the hard drive first. The
> recovery
>> > program will not continue until this target is available.
>> >
>> > As a further backup, a clone (not an image) is suggested on a removable
>> > ide
>> > hard drive. Just clone it back to its orignal source. Or use it just
>> > like
>> > the original hard drive by putting it on the ide ribbon cable of the
>> > former
>> > hard drive ribbon location. If you buy a new hard drive, buy two, and
> use
>> > one for a clone target. Image recovery is much faster, so I tend to
> rely
>> > on
>> > that myself, but still maintain a clone. Overkill to some, but makes a
>> > whole lotta sense to me.
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
Anonymous
June 12, 2005 5:48:56 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

In news:u5Ht6F2bFHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl,
George Hester <hesterloli@hotmail.com> typed:

> And the other thing about System Restore that I didn't like is
> the
> one time I tried it it did nothing but stop the system from
> booting.
> Hey it wasn't any good before the System Restore but it was a
> hellofa
> lot worse after doing it.


System Restore, unthough unfortunately not perfect, can be a very
useful feature. Its a tool that has gotten me and many others out
of trouble many times.

Unfortunately sometimes it gets corrupted and doesn't work, and
then the only cure is to turn it off and back on again. But I've
never seen a situation in which using it made a situation worse.
If you say it did in your case, I believe you, but that's a very
unusual occurrence.


--
Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
Please reply to the newsgroup
Anonymous
June 12, 2005 11:45:20 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

I kept going further and further back in the Restore points. Always
checking to see if the new issue was fixed. It never was and I know I went
back to before I installed the stuff I said I installed. So I finally went
all the way back to the initial install. That's all she wrote it never
booted again. At that point I gave up on XP and went to the Win 2K server.
And that's been humming along at SP4 with no additional security updates but
for one or two.

--
George Hester
_______________________________
"Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
news:o lKQoA5bFHA.2796@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> In news:u5Ht6F2bFHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl,
> George Hester <hesterloli@hotmail.com> typed:
>
> > And the other thing about System Restore that I didn't like is
> > the
> > one time I tried it it did nothing but stop the system from
> > booting.
> > Hey it wasn't any good before the System Restore but it was a
> > hellofa
> > lot worse after doing it.
>
>
> System Restore, unthough unfortunately not perfect, can be a very
> useful feature. Its a tool that has gotten me and many others out
> of trouble many times.
>
> Unfortunately sometimes it gets corrupted and doesn't work, and
> then the only cure is to turn it off and back on again. But I've
> never seen a situation in which using it made a situation worse.
> If you say it did in your case, I believe you, but that's a very
> unusual occurrence.
>
>
> --
> Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
> Please reply to the newsgroup
>
>
!