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I don't understand local real-estate language

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Anonymous
May 19, 2005 8:34:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

In particular, the way they make up words, or misuse words.

Two examples:

1. Since we're buying a condo there's a typical condition on the sale that
says that the buyer (us) gets a lawyer look over the condominium
corporation's finances to make sure there's nothing fishy going on. Both
our real-estate agent and mortgage broker who have never met and live in
different cities have called this procedure what sounds like "estapo". Now
I'm interested in linguistics so I tried looking this word up to see about
its origins and other uses, but for the life of me I can't find it
anywhere.

2. One of the other conditions is that we can arrange financing by a
certain time. Our deadline is Friday, and it looks like we'll have
everything ready by Thursday so that condition will be met. What I find
strange is that the same two people (our agent and broker) have both said
that we'll then be able to "waive" the financing condition. Once again I
was intrigued since I've always been under the impression that "to waive"
means to dismiss or abandon, in other words to drop the condition even
though it hasn't been met.

I've tried to find anything online from other eal-estate related pages
where the term "estapo" or something similar is used, or where "waive" is
being used in the same context and I haven't been able to find anything.
Could it be that SW Ontario has its own local terminology?

--
Cape Dweller Dragon
Remember, I've got a debt to pay. It's about quantity, not quality.
Anonymous
May 19, 2005 9:01:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Cape Dweller wrote:

> I've tried to find anything online from other eal-estate related pages
> where the term "estapo" or something similar is used, or where "waive" is
> being used in the same context and I haven't been able to find anything.
> Could it be that SW Ontario has its own local terminology?

Hmm... I just found a Calgary site that uses "waive" in this fashion so
maybe it's a Canadian thing: http://www.calgarylaw.com/Faq.html

--
Cape Dweller Dragon
Remember, I've got a debt to pay. It's about quantity, not quality.
Anonymous
May 19, 2005 1:47:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Thu, 19 May 2005 10:34:34 +0200, Cape Dweller <usenet@ciotog.net> wrote:

> In particular, the way they make up words, or misuse words.
>
....>

Something different but related.

I recently watched a TV programme about the use (and misuse) of the
norwegian language (AND I DON'T CONSIDER SPEAKING IT A MISUSE OF THE
LANGUAGE!!!!), and the subject was real-estate language. In this
particular example they examined a condo which supposedly was a
"steinkast" (don't know how you put it in english, but it's the distance
you can throw a stone) away from "Aker Brygge", a very attractive part of
Oslo, our capital.

So they hired Trine Hattestad, winner of the olympic gold medal in the
female javelin throwing contest, Sydney 2000. Gave her a stone ad asked
her to throw it as far as she could from the street outside the apartment.
I don't know exactly how far she threw the stone, but I presume she
performed far better then I would have. I further presume the sound of
breaking glass was an added sound effect.

She would have to through the stone 18 times as far to reach Aker Brygge.

pibbur, 200 steinkasts from the centre of Bergen

--
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Anonymous
May 19, 2005 1:52:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Thu, 19 May 2005 11:47:11 +0200, pibbur
<oopsREMOVETHISANDxx.000xx@tele2xx.xxno> wrote:

> On Thu, 19 May 2005 10:34:34 +0200, Cape Dweller <usenet@ciotog.net>
> wrote:
>
>> In particular, the way they make up words, or misuse words.
>>
> ...>
>
> Something different but related.
>
> I recently watched a TV programme about the use (and misuse) of the
> norwegian language (AND I DON'T CONSIDER SPEAKING IT A MISUSE OF THE
> LANGUAGE!!!!), and the subject was real-estate language. In this
> particular example they examined a condo which supposedly was a
> "steinkast" (don't know how you put it in english, but it's the distance
> you can throw a stone) away from "Aker Brygge", a very attractive part
> of Oslo, our capital.
>
> So they hired Trine Hattestad, winner of the olympic gold medal in the
> female javelin throwing contest, Sydney 2000. Gave her a stone ad asked
> her to throw it as far as she could from the street outside the
> apartment. I don't know exactly how far she threw the stone, but I
> presume she performed far better then I would have. I further presume
> the sound of breaking glass was an added sound effect.
>
> She would have to through the stone 18 times as far to reach Aker Brygge.
Correction:

She would have to throw the stone 18 times as far to reach Aker Brygge

pibbur
May 19, 2005 5:09:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Quoth pibbur <oopsREMOVETHISANDxx.000xx@tele2xx.xxno>:
> they examined a condo which supposedly was a "steinkast" (don't know
> how you put it in english, but it's the distance you can throw a stone)

In English, it is a "stone's throw". :) 

> She would have to through the stone 18 times as far to reach Aker Brygge.

*grin* Taking it a little literally, I think. The phrase is generally
considered to mean easy walking distance by estate agents/realtors.
--
___________________________________________________________
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,^ ( ..) Samurai Dragon -==UDIC Sig Code==-
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Anonymous
May 19, 2005 7:37:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Cape Dweller wrote:
> In particular, the way they make up words, or misuse words.
>
> Two examples:
>
> 1. Since we're buying a condo there's a typical condition on the sale that
> says that the buyer (us) gets a lawyer look over the condominium
> corporation's finances to make sure there's nothing fishy going on. Both
> our real-estate agent and mortgage broker who have never met and live in
> different cities have called this procedure what sounds like "estapo". Now
> I'm interested in linguistics so I tried looking this word up to see about
> its origins and other uses, but for the life of me I can't find it
> anywhere.

Possibly it's "Gestapo", which was the Nazi party's secret police in
Germany.

--
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---------------------------------+-------+----------------------------------
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Anonymous
May 20, 2005 12:37:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Words to the wise, Cape Dweller <usenet@ciotog.net> wrote:

>1. Since we're buying a condo there's a typical condition on the sale that
>says that the buyer (us) gets a lawyer look over the condominium
>corporation's finances to make sure there's nothing fishy going on. Both
>our real-estate agent and mortgage broker who have never met and live in
>different cities have called this procedure what sounds like "estapo". Now
>I'm interested in linguistics so I tried looking this word up to see about
>its origins and other uses, but for the life of me I can't find it
>anywhere.

I think they meant Gestapo in the sense of extreme monitoring?

>2. One of the other conditions is that we can arrange financing by a
>certain time. Our deadline is Friday, and it looks like we'll have
>everything ready by Thursday so that condition will be met. What I find
>strange is that the same two people (our agent and broker) have both said
>that we'll then be able to "waive" the financing condition. Once again I
>was intrigued since I've always been under the impression that "to waive"
>means to dismiss or abandon, in other words to drop the condition even
>though it hasn't been met.

As far as I as a non-native speaker can tell, "waive" only has those
meanings. My dictionairies all agree on that.

>I've tried to find anything online from other eal-estate related pages
>where the term "estapo" or something similar is used, or where "waive" is
>being used in the same context and I haven't been able to find anything.
>Could it be that SW Ontario has its own local terminology?

Why should localism/localisation stop at linguistics?
May 20, 2005 5:25:36 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Quoth Aquamarine Dragon <nospam0505@joesbox.cjb.net>:
....
> Possibly it's "Gestapo", which was the Nazi party's secret police in
> Germany.

And the Prussian secret police under Bismarck prior to that, IIRC.
--
___________________________________________________________
\^\^//
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Anonymous
May 22, 2005 5:56:58 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Claus Dragon wrote:

> I think they meant Gestapo in the sense of extreme monitoring?

I asked our agent the last time he was here and the word is actually
"estoppel", which seems to mean checking to see if the condo corporation
is actually telling the truth when they say there aren't any outstanding
financial/legal issues.

> As far as I as a non-native speaker can tell, "waive" only has those
> meanings. My dictionairies all agree on that.

Actually now that I think about it waiving the conditions make sense for a
few reasons. For one, it means that the condition doesn't have to be
finalised by a certain time, only that it will be. In our case, for
example, we have a mortgage broker who has guaranteed that once we
actually sign all the papers we'll have a mortgage, so rather than rushing
to get all the paperwork out of the way by a certain date the condition is
waived since it's clear that it will have been met by the time the deal is
finished.

> Why should localism/localisation stop at linguistics?

No reason :) 

--
Cape Dweller Dragon
Remember, I've got a debt to pay. It's about quantity, not quality.
Anonymous
May 25, 2005 6:21:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Cape Dweller wrote:
> In particular, the way they make up words, or misuse words.
>
> Two examples:
>
> 1. Since we're buying a condo there's a typical condition on the sale that
> says that the buyer (us) gets a lawyer look over the condominium
> corporation's finances to make sure there's nothing fishy going on. Both
> our real-estate agent and mortgage broker who have never met and live in
> different cities have called this procedure what sounds like "estapo". Now
> I'm interested in linguistics so I tried looking this word up to see about
> its origins and other uses, but for the life of me I can't find it
> anywhere.

If it's something to do with legal terminology, it might be something
from Latin. However, I can not for the life of me think of anything in
Latin which sounds like any phonetic variant of what you just said.

Not that I'm the greatest scholar of the language, but I did take two
years in HS and two more in college, so I have some idea what it sounds
like.

Maybe another here can figure out what term it is, since I'm not up to
the task.

-Lumina Dragon
Anonymous
May 25, 2005 7:33:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Wed, 25 May 2005 14:21:54 -0500, Lumina Dragon <kewhitte@hotmail.com>
wrote:

>Cape Dweller wrote:
>> In particular, the way they make up words, or misuse words.
>>
>> Two examples:
>>
>> 1. Since we're buying a condo there's a typical condition on the sale that
>> says that the buyer (us) gets a lawyer look over the condominium
>> corporation's finances to make sure there's nothing fishy going on. Both
>> our real-estate agent and mortgage broker who have never met and live in
>> different cities have called this procedure what sounds like "estapo". Now
>> I'm interested in linguistics so I tried looking this word up to see about
>> its origins and other uses, but for the life of me I can't find it
>> anywhere.
>
>If it's something to do with legal terminology, it might be something
>from Latin. However, I can not for the life of me think of anything in
>Latin which sounds like any phonetic variant of what you just said.
>
>Not that I'm the greatest scholar of the language, but I did take two
>years in HS and two more in college, so I have some idea what it sounds
>like.
>
>Maybe another here can figure out what term it is, since I'm not up to
>the task.

ESTOPPEL: A bar to alleging or denying a fact because of one's own
previous actions or words to the contrary.

--
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Anonymous
June 1, 2005 8:43:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Polychromic wrote:
>
> ESTOPPEL: A bar to alleging or denying a fact because of one's own
> previous actions or words to the contrary.

Well, there ya go. Still doesn't look Latin to me - looks vaguely german
what with the ending and all - but I bow to Poly's expertise.

-Lumina Dragon
!