Moving a hard drive

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

I am trying to move an existing hardrive from a Pentium Celeron system to an
AMD system. When I move the drive and try to boot, the system goes only so
far, then shuts down, and reboots. I have tried booting in safe mode but
still have the same problem.

Can anypone help with this? I have too much data on the existing drive so I
don't want to format the drive and re-install.
--
Jim
6 answers Last reply
More about moving hard drive
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    If XP came preinstalled on the first system there is a possibility that it
    was BIOS locked. Some OEMs do this. Therefore you can't move the hard drive
    to a completely different system and retain the setup.

    OEM versions of XP are bound to the first system they are install on. Some
    are BIOS locked and some are not. OEM versions that are not BIOS locked can
    not legally be installed on another system. That is by agreement between the
    vender and Microsoft. If your version of XP came with your Celeron system
    then it may very well be an OEM version (it should say so on the CD) and as
    such you are not legally allow to use it to run a Repair Install on a
    different computer.

    However if your copy of XP is a retail version then boot the AMD system with
    the XP CD and select the option to Install Windows (not use the Recovery
    Console). Accept the License Agreement by pressing F8. At this point you
    should see a message that Windows is searching for a previous installation.
    If it finds one then you will see a screen that asks if you want to attempt
    to repair the current installation. At this time press "R" to repair and
    setup should run with the end result being that a new HAL (hardware
    abstraction layer) will be built and your system should be up and running
    without data loss. You will have to reinstall Windows Updates and Service
    Packs again though. See How To Run A Repair Install
    http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/repair_xp.htm

    If you need to purchase a retail version make certain it is the same
    version, either Home or Pro, that you want to repair.
    --

    Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
    www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


    "Jim" <jwhorton@sealco.com> wrote in message
    news:19828376-567B-4AC9-92EC-D8C82BC3B9B3@microsoft.com...
    > I am trying to move an existing hardrive from a Pentium Celeron system to
    an
    > AMD system. When I move the drive and try to boot, the system goes only so
    > far, then shuts down, and reboots. I have tried booting in safe mode but
    > still have the same problem.
    >
    > Can anypone help with this? I have too much data on the existing drive so
    I
    > don't want to format the drive and re-install.
    > --
    > Jim
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    You will probably have to do a repair installation to get windows to work
    with the new hardware.


    "Jim" <jwhorton@sealco.com> wrote in message
    news:19828376-567B-4AC9-92EC-D8C82BC3B9B3@microsoft.com...
    >I am trying to move an existing hardrive from a Pentium Celeron system to
    >an
    > AMD system. When I move the drive and try to boot, the system goes only so
    > far, then shuts down, and reboots. I have tried booting in safe mode but
    > still have the same problem.
    >
    > Can anypone help with this? I have too much data on the existing drive so
    > I
    > don't want to format the drive and re-install.
    > --
    > Jim
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    In news:19828376-567B-4AC9-92EC-D8C82BC3B9B3@microsoft.com,
    Jim <jwhorton@sealco.com> typed:

    > I am trying to move an existing hardrive from a Pentium Celeron
    > system to an AMD system. When I move the drive and try to boot,
    > the
    > system goes only so far, then shuts down, and reboots. I have
    > tried
    > booting in safe mode but still have the same problem.
    >
    > Can anypone help with this? I have too much data on the
    > existing
    > drive so I don't want to format the drive and re-install.


    You can't just move a drive to a different computer and expect it
    to boot. At the very least, you will need to do a repair
    installation.

    Read "How to Perform a Windows XP Repair Install" at
    http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/XPrepairinstall.htm

    Worst case, however, you *may* have to reformat and do a clean
    installation. If that's the case, you'll need to first copy off
    all the data you need.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Jim:

    It sounds like the new system has a problem other than the hard drive?
    Can you boot the hard drive in the old computer still? Will the new
    system boot and say hard drive not found?

    With the systems being so different you will need to do a repair
    install at the least if you can get it to work at all. However the
    system should not reboot? You may also want to look at the
    Master/Slave vs Cable select settings whichever one you have set try
    the other ;)


    Wayne

    Jim wrote:

    > I am trying to move an existing hardrive from a Pentium Celeron
    > system to an AMD system. When I move the drive and try to boot, the
    > system goes only so far, then shuts down, and reboots. I have tried
    > booting in safe mode but still have the same problem.
    >
    > Can anypone help with this? I have too much data on the existing
    > drive so I don't want to format the drive and re-install.
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    On Mon, 13 Jun 2005 09:31:01 -0600, "Harry Ohrn" <harry---@webtree.ca>
    wrote:

    >... boot the AMD system with
    >the XP CD and select the option to Install Windows (not use the Recovery
    >Console).

    MS should fix their prompts for those options. The 'Recovery' part
    throws everyone off.

    >...At this point you
    >should see a message that Windows is searching for a previous installation.
    >If it finds one then you will see a screen that asks if you want to attempt
    >to repair the current installation. At this time press "R" to repair and
    >setup should run with the end result being that a new HAL (hardware
    >abstraction layer) will be built and your system should be up and running
    >without data loss.

    Good timing on this thread. I was just going to upgrade a system to a
    faster Asus motherboard. The current system drive is imaged, etc.,
    but I still hate to waste time reloading if anything goes wrong. In
    the past, minor upgrades have been easy, but this time XP will indeed
    need to load a new HAL, as this system is moving from an older
    Northwood to a multithreaded processor (still Northwood. Prescotts
    don't seem effective). Normally I'd reformat and start from scratch,
    but there are too many programs, plugins, etc. I was wondering how
    well XP's repair would deal with the multithreaded CPU.

    >You will have to reinstall Windows Updates and Service
    >Packs again though. See How To Run A Repair Install
    >http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/repair_xp.htm

    I'm still avoiding SP2. I have heard rumors that at some point, MS is
    going to 'enforce' SP2 in the updates process. Not sure exactly what
    that means, but I'd hate to sift thru updates, trying to weed out
    SP2-specific stuff. I don't know if there's a simple way to deal
    with this.

    ------

    For the OP:

    It also bears mentioning that the original XP install CD could not
    deal with partitions over 137GB. I don't know why anyone would create
    that large a system partition, but it happens. In that case, the
    original XP install CD's file system will fail. The way around it is
    to 'slipstream' service pack 1 into the install CD to create a new
    install CD. This depends on how old your XP installation CD is.

    But I recommend keeping C: partitions small. I haven't seen a system
    yet that can't get by with 30GB or so as a C: drive. Usually 20GB is
    enough. That way, imaging the C drive (for backup) doesn't use a huge
    chunk of your backup drive, and you can do incremental backups on your
    data partition. Nothing lost if you create a C: partition that's a
    bit larger than 20GB; imaging software will only create a file from
    used space. Still, you want to keep programs, not data, on the C:
    partition.

    Another benefit that's not mentioned often: I always turn off
    'restore' on the data drives. Usually when you want to revert to a
    previous restore point, you don't want to delete all the data you've
    saved up to that point. If you don't turn 'restore' off on the data
    drive(s) that's exactly what will happen. Of course you want to leave
    it turned on for the C: drive, so if your data is on C:, yer outa
    luck.

    To access system restore, r-click on 'my computer' and go to
    'properties.' You'll see the tab.
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "Jim" <jwhorton@sealco.com> wrote in message
    news:19828376-567B-4AC9-92EC-D8C82BC3B9B3@microsoft.com...
    > I am trying to move an existing hardrive from a Pentium Celeron system to
    an
    > AMD system. When I move the drive and try to boot, the system goes only so
    > far, then shuts down, and reboots. I have tried booting in safe mode but
    > still have the same problem.
    >
    > Can anypone help with this? I have too much data on the existing drive so
    I
    > don't want to format the drive and re-install.
    > --
    > Jim

    Here are a few links that explain how to port WinXP to different hardware:
    http://support.microsoft.com/directory/article.asp?ID=KB;EN-US;Q249694
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q314082
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=KB;EN-US;Q315341

    Your remark " I have too much data on the existing drive so I
    don't want to format the drive and re-install." points to a disaster
    waiting to happen. Sooner or later something will go wrong on
    your machine, causing you to lose the lot. At that stage you might
    ask yourself why you did not invest a small amount of money in
    an external hard disk inside a USB enclosure, used weekly for
    backup purposes. It comes back to this truism: If your data is
    important, back it up. If you don't back it up then it is not
    important (because you don't mind losing it).
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