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FM antenna?

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June 22, 2005 4:10:31 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

Looking for recommendations for a *good* indoor FM antenna. Does
such a beast exist? Trying to improve reception of a college (88.3 MHz)
station.

Any ideas? Yes, I'm aware of the FM-2G-C. But that's an outdoor
alternative. Is the "FM Reflect" any good?

http://www.ccrane.com/fm-reflect-antenna.aspx

Thanks.

More about : antenna

Anonymous
June 23, 2005 4:07:54 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

Eric wrote:
> Looking for recommendations for a *good* indoor FM antenna. Does
> such a beast exist? Trying to improve reception of a college (88.3 MHz)
> station.
>


I've had very good results in a number of installations with the
Magnum-Dynalab ST-2.
June 25, 2005 6:27:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

In article <d9aa9n02eaq@news4.newsguy.com>, Eric <knippe@gmail.com>
wrote:

> Looking for recommendations for a *good* indoor FM antenna. Does
> such a beast exist?

I have been using a B I C "Beam Box" for a couple of decades now.
Very directional, but it comes with the means to direct it easily.
They're sold frequently on "that auction site." Only two moving
parts, so it's not like you can go wrong buying one.

sd
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June 26, 2005 7:04:31 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

Buster Mudd wrote:

> > Looking for recommendations for a *good* indoor FM antenna. Does
> > such a beast exist? Trying to improve reception of a college (88.3 MHz)
> > station.
> >
>
> I've had very good results in a number of installations with the
> Magnum-Dynalab ST-2.

You're the second one I've seen recommend this antenna. How does it
perform in the 88-90 MHz range as compared to the FM-2G-C, which is
really a 80-100 MHz range antenna?
June 26, 2005 7:04:48 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

sd wrote:

> > Looking for recommendations for a *good* indoor FM antenna. Does
> > such a beast exist?
>
> I have been using a B I C "Beam Box" for a couple of decades now.
> Very directional, but it comes with the means to direct it easily.
> They're sold frequently on "that auction site." Only two moving
> parts, so it's not like you can go wrong buying one.

I saw one at "that auction site" just the other day. Used, but he
wanted $100-$150 for it. How does it play in the 88-90 MHz area?
June 27, 2005 5:46:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

In article <d9l60g02oce@news2.newsguy.com>, Eric <knippe@gmail.com>
wrote:

> sd wrote:
>
> > I have been using a B I C "Beam Box" for a couple of decades now.
> > [snip]
>
> I saw one at "that auction site" just the other day. Used, but he
> wanted $100-$150 for it. How does it play in the 88-90 MHz area?

As well as it does elsewhere. Keep in mind it's not an amplified
antenna, so if the issue is incoming signal strength from a 10-watt
FM or a tuner that's not as sensitive as you'd like, the Beam Box
won't do that much for you. It's a passive antenna designed to weed
out a good signal from among the distortion and garbage.

As for paying $100 for it, I don't think I paid $100 for mine when
it was brand new. I certainly wouldn't part with that kind of money
for one now. They come cheaper than that; I'd wait a bit if your're
inclined to go that way.

sd
Anonymous
June 27, 2005 5:50:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

Eric wrote:
> Looking for recommendations for a *good* indoor FM antenna. Does
> such a beast exist?

No. All of those various indoor antennas are just varients
on the standard twin lead dipole antenna, despite anyone's
claims. If you were to compare any of them with a roof-mounted
antenna, it would be like comparing a BB gun to an Atom Bomb.

> Trying to improve reception of a college (88.3 MHz)
> station.

Winegard makes an antenna, though intended for
outdoor use, could be used in a dorm room or such if you
were to hang it from your ceiling. Google for the
Winegard PR6010 FM antenna. It costs all of $24.95 at:

http://www.teeveesupply.com/product_pages/antennas/wine...

If you are in a position to put up a roof mounted FM antenna,
then by all means do so. The cheapest Pioneer receiver with
a good roof mounted FM antenna will beat the pants off of
any of the legendary, price-no-object tuners made by Marantz,
McIntosh, Yamaha or Sequerra fed by one of those indoor
FM antennas made by anyone. Those indoor antennas
are little better than hanging a piece of wire off the back
of your receiver.

Russ
Anonymous
June 27, 2005 6:51:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

"sd" <sd55117@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:D 9nlq601mt3@news4.newsguy.com...
> In article <d9l60g02oce@news2.newsguy.com>, Eric <knippe@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>> sd wrote:
>>
>> > I have been using a B I C "Beam Box" for a couple of decades now.
>> > [snip]
>>
>> I saw one at "that auction site" just the other day. Used, but he
>> wanted $100-$150 for it. How does it play in the 88-90 MHz area?
>
> As well as it does elsewhere. Keep in mind it's not an amplified
> antenna, so if the issue is incoming signal strength from a 10-watt
> FM or a tuner that's not as sensitive as you'd like, the Beam Box
> won't do that much for you. It's a passive antenna designed to weed
> out a good signal from among the distortion and garbage.
>
> As for paying $100 for it, I don't think I paid $100 for mine when
> it was brand new. I certainly wouldn't part with that kind of money
> for one now. They come cheaper than that; I'd wait a bit if your're
> inclined to go that way.

I sold one a few years ago on eBay for about $20 plus shipping. I paid $0
for it. I'd put the true value range at $0-25.

I'd also stress that the unit won't work miracules. It essentially is a
folded, folded dipole and it's signal boost is weaker than a straight folded
dipole. What it can help with is orientation, since it can be turned 270
degrees pretty easily.
Anonymous
June 27, 2005 7:01:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

I can't say I've ever specifically checked its performance at any one
part of the spectrum; it's just been our go-to antenna whenever someone
can't pick up their favorite stations using the stock dipole. The only
time the Magnum-Dynalab ST-2 hasn't solved the problem perfectly was
when we were dealing with folks in rural Connecticut who wanted to
listen to a low-output college station in southern New Jersey. (The
solution for them was an SE879 outdoor antenna from SE Engineering.)
June 28, 2005 12:27:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

Buster Mudd wrote:

> I can't say I've ever specifically checked its performance at any one
> part of the spectrum; it's just been our go-to antenna whenever someone
> can't pick up their favorite stations using the stock dipole. The only
> time the Magnum-Dynalab ST-2 hasn't solved the problem perfectly was
> when we were dealing with folks in rural Connecticut who wanted to
> listen to a low-output college station in southern New Jersey. (The
> solution for them was an SE879 outdoor antenna from SE Engineering.)

Thanks. I received email stating that the ST-2, at 54 inches, suffered
in the 88-92 MHz range. Since the station I'm after is at 88.3 MHz, I
was interested by the FM-2G-C.
June 28, 2005 12:27:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

sd wrote:

> > > I have been using a B I C "Beam Box" for a couple of decades now.
> > > [snip]
> >
> > I saw one at "that auction site" just the other day. Used, but he
> > wanted $100-$150 for it. How does it play in the 88-90 MHz area?
>
> As well as it does elsewhere. Keep in mind it's not an amplified
> antenna, so if the issue is incoming signal strength from a 10-watt
> FM or a tuner that's not as sensitive as you'd like, the Beam Box
> won't do that much for you. It's a passive antenna designed to weed
> out a good signal from among the distortion and garbage.
>
> As for paying $100 for it, I don't think I paid $100 for mine when
> it was brand new. I certainly wouldn't part with that kind of money
> for one now. They come cheaper than that; I'd wait a bit if your're
> inclined to go that way.

That price included another piece of equipment, a "signal grabber" or
some such thing. If it is just a dipole (or folded dipole), chances
are that it is optimized for around 102 MHz, and suffers a little at
88.3 MHz.

Thanks.
June 28, 2005 12:28:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

Russ Button wrote:

> > Looking for recommendations for a *good* indoor FM antenna. Does
> > such a beast exist?
>
> No. All of those various indoor antennas are just varients
> on the standard twin lead dipole antenna, despite anyone's
> claims. If you were to compare any of them with a roof-mounted
> antenna, it would be like comparing a BB gun to an Atom Bomb.

Yes, but a roof mount is not an option. All pre-made dipoles seem
to be optimized for about 102 MHz (54" element.) So I guess my best
option is to construct my own antenna optimized for 88.3 MHz.

Thanks.
!