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What are your favorite classical music pieces?

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Anonymous
July 31, 2005 12:11:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Okay, after Amazon.com ran out of that Lindsay's version of Beethoven's
late quartets, I ordered the Tokyo String Quartet's version instead. I
think it's quite official that Op. 132 has to be one of my favorite
classical pieces (and I am using "classical" inclusively). Now that would
go with Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2 as one of my favorite classical
suites. Franck's Sonata for Violin and Piano in A is also a favorite.

--
Ashikaga a27
Anonymous
July 31, 2005 12:11:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Ashikaga wrote:
> Okay, after Amazon.com ran out of that Lindsay's version of Beethoven's
> late quartets, I ordered the Tokyo String Quartet's version instead. I
> think it's quite official that Op. 132 has to be one of my favorite
> classical pieces (and I am using "classical" inclusively). Now that would
> go with Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2 as one of my favorite classical
> suites. Franck's Sonata for Violin and Piano in A is also a favorite.
>

Steve Reich, The Desert Music
Vaughn Williams' Sixth Symphony and Norfolk Rhapsody
Britten, the Nocturnes after John Dowland
William Lawes, the Royal Consort Suites
Anonymous
July 31, 2005 12:44:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 10:11:13 +0200, Ashikaga <citizenashi@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Okay, after Amazon.com ran out of that Lindsay's version of Beethoven's
> late quartets, I ordered the Tokyo String Quartet's version instead. I
> think it's quite official that Op. 132 has to be one of my favorite
> classical pieces (and I am using "classical" inclusively). Now that
> would
> go with Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2 as one of my favorite
> classical
> suites. Franck's Sonata for Violin and Piano in A is also a favorite.
>

Igor Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring
Carl Orff: Carmina Burana
Gustav Holst: The Planets
Leos Janacek: Glagolitic Mass
Henryk Gorecki: Symphony 3 "Sorrowful Songs"
Bela Bartok: The Wooden Prince

--
pibbur

Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Related resources
Anonymous
July 31, 2005 12:44:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 08:44:20 GMT, pibbur
<oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:


>
>Igor Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring
>Carl Orff: Carmina Burana
>Gustav Holst: The Planets
>Leos Janacek: Glagolitic Mass
>Henryk Gorecki: Symphony 3 "Sorrowful Songs"
>Bela Bartok: The Wooden Prince

Well, I can tell we have entirely different tastes. Though I do like
Mars from The Planets. (Very strange to play though.)

Back up about a century and that's when I start liking stuff, and
another century and two and I like an even wider variety.



--

Erimess Dragon
-==(UDIC)==-

d++e+NT++Om UK!1!2!3!A!L!
U+uCuFuG+++uLB+uA+ nC+nH+nP+nS++nT-xa2

This is the comfort of everyone: That tho' they
may be said to die, yet their love and devotion
are, in best sense, ever present because immortal.
~William Penn
In memory of my father, 1 Jan 05
Anonymous
July 31, 2005 7:36:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 13:22:10 +0200, <erimess> wrote:

> On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 08:44:20 GMT, pibbur
> <oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:
>
>
>>
>> Igor Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring
>> Carl Orff: Carmina Burana
>> Gustav Holst: The Planets
>> Leos Janacek: Glagolitic Mass
>> Henryk Gorecki: Symphony 3 "Sorrowful Songs"
>> Bela Bartok: The Wooden Prince
>
> Well, I can tell we have entirely different tastes. Though I do like
> Mars from The Planets. (Very strange to play though.)
>

I'm mostly into progressive rock and heavy metal (satanics and monster
cookie vocals excluded). So I guess it's only natural that I seek the
strangeness and the disharmonics of the 20th century when it comes to
classical music.

> Back up about a century and that's when I start liking stuff, and
> another century and two and I like an even wider variety.
>
Have you listened to the Gorecki symphony? I think you might like that
one. It's a slowly developing piece, very melodic (and very sad), and it
has a very nice vocal part. It's music to relax to, to be comforted by (I
often listen to it when I'm sad, it feels like someone understand me).

I would recommend the recording on the Elektra Nonesuch label.

--
pibbur

Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Anonymous
July 31, 2005 9:41:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Eek! pibbur wrote:
<snip>
> I'm mostly into progressive rock and heavy metal (satanics and monster
> cookie vocals excluded). So I guess it's only natural that I seek the
> strangeness and the disharmonics of the 20th century when it comes to
> classical music.

My brother loves Gershwin, but I am not crazy about him (the musician). I
think the proper musical term is dissonance (though I know what you mean by
disharmonics). Correct me if I am wrong.

Early 20th Century is a good era though. I generally like the art and
literatures coming from that era. Blame everything on Industrial
Revolution because that's why all the chaos and orders are intertwining in
works made in that era.

--
Ashikaga a27
Anonymous
July 31, 2005 9:59:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Eek! Submersible wrote:
> Ashikaga wrote:
>> Okay, after Amazon.com ran out of that Lindsay's version of Beethoven's
>> late quartets, I ordered the Tokyo String Quartet's version instead. I
>> think it's quite official that Op. 132 has to be one of my favorite
>> classical pieces (and I am using "classical" inclusively). Now that would
>> go with Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2 as one of my favorite classical
>> suites. Franck's Sonata for Violin and Piano in A is also a favorite.
>
> Steve Reich, The Desert Music
> Vaughn Williams' Sixth Symphony and Norfolk Rhapsody
> Britten, the Nocturnes after John Dowland
> William Lawes, the Royal Consort Suites

Interesting selections. It's like a traditionalist mixes with new age
interpretations. I still have some Mushie's stuff in my HDD, and I think
the stuff he composes is like that too.

My taste is just very plain Romanticism, I guess.

Anyways, have you heard of the soundtracks from Simcity 4 (especially from
Rush Hour expansion pack). Those are good! I don't know whether typical
computer gamers would appreciate them though. Those are pretty
neo-classical and perhaps Pibbur would like them too. Maxis's soundtracks
tend to be a little New Age-ish.

I am not ear trained, so can't really write out stuff I compose in my head.
Otherwise, I would have my very own first movement of concerto for violins
and piano(s) already.... I think it's nice to have my own creation
published....

--
Ashikaga a27
Anonymous
July 31, 2005 10:53:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On 31 Jul 2005 04:26:29 -0700, submersible@gmail.com wrote:

>
>Ashikaga wrote:
>> Okay, after Amazon.com ran out of that Lindsay's version of Beethoven's
>> late quartets, I ordered the Tokyo String Quartet's version instead. I
>> think it's quite official that Op. 132 has to be one of my favorite
>> classical pieces (and I am using "classical" inclusively). Now that would
>> go with Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2 as one of my favorite classical
>> suites. Franck's Sonata for Violin and Piano in A is also a favorite.
>>
>
>Steve Reich, The Desert Music
>Vaughn Williams' Sixth Symphony and Norfolk Rhapsody
>Britten, the Nocturnes after John Dowland
>William Lawes, the Royal Consort Suites
Emerson, Lake and Palmer - Pictures At An Exhibition.
Tomita- Firebird Suite and Night On Bald Mountain.
Synergy - Classical Gas.


-=UDIC=-
Optician Dragon
"That's the great thing about being dumb -
You don't feel bad when you don't come up with a good idea."
-"Frog" from Best Of The West
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 5:34:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 19:41:39 +0200, Ashikaga <citizenashi@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Eek! pibbur wrote:
> <snip>
>> I'm mostly into progressive rock and heavy metal (satanics and monster
>> cookie vocals excluded). So I guess it's only natural that I seek the
>> strangeness and the disharmonics of the 20th century when it comes to
>> classical music.
>
> My brother loves Gershwin, but I am not crazy about him (the musician).
> I
> think the proper musical term is dissonance (though I know what you mean
> by
> disharmonics). Correct me if I am wrong.
>
Dissonance. I stand corrected. Thank you.

> Early 20th Century is a good era though. I generally like the art and
> literatures coming from that era. Blame everything on Industrial
> Revolution because that's why all the chaos and orders are intertwining
> in
> works made in that era.
>
Lots of good painters form that era: Gustav Klimt, Picasso, Edvard Munch
)Norwegian!!!), Rene Magritte,
--
pibbur

Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 8:30:50 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Eek! pibbur wrote:
> Ashikaga wrote:
<snip>
>> Early 20th Century is a good era though. I generally like the art and
>> literatures coming from that era. Blame everything on Industrial
>> Revolution because that's why all the chaos and orders are intertwining
>> in works made in that era.
>>
> Lots of good painters form that era: Gustav Klimt, Picasso, Edvard Munch
> )Norwegian!!!), Rene Magritte,

And another Edvard I can think of who is a Norwegian, Edvard Grieg. Though
he was a musician. But I can totally understand why you like those kind of
music now. I think perhaps Norwegians like those more chaotic dissonance
in their music.

--
Ashikaga a27
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 7:10:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Mon, 01 Aug 2005 06:30:50 +0200, Ashikaga <citizenashi@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Eek! pibbur wrote:
>> Ashikaga wrote:
> <snip>
>>> Early 20th Century is a good era though. I generally like the art and
>>> literatures coming from that era. Blame everything on Industrial
>>> Revolution because that's why all the chaos and orders are intertwining
>>> in works made in that era.
>>>
>> Lots of good painters form that era: Gustav Klimt, Picasso, Edvard Munch
>> )Norwegian!!!), Rene Magritte,
>
> And another Edvard I can think of who is a Norwegian, Edvard Grieg.
> Though
> he was a musician. But I can totally understand why you like those kind
> of
> music now. I think perhaps Norwegians like those more chaotic dissonance
> in their music.
>
I wouldn't think norwegians differ much from europeans/americans regarding
interest in classical music.

Then again, perhaps our attitude is different - the danes tend to make fun
of the following:

The most famous norwegian painting is "The Scream"
(http://www.gallerydirectart.com/cg-713.html) by Edvard Munch. The most
famous painting by a danish painter is "Hip, Hip, Hooray"
(http://www.reproductionfineart.com/view_product~product...) by
P.S. Krøyer.

--
says pibbur who is currently listening to "Remedy Lane" by the swedish
progressive metal band "Pain Of Salvation", and who will thereafter listen
to "Feel Euphoria" by "Spock's beard" (an american progressive rock band).

Because he bought both albums today.

Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 8:28:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Eek! pibbur wrote:
> Ashikaga wrote:
<snip>
>> And another Edvard I can think of who is a Norwegian, Edvard Grieg.
>> Though
>> he was a musician. But I can totally understand why you like those kind
>> of
>> music now. I think perhaps Norwegians like those more chaotic dissonance
>> in their music.
>>
> I wouldn't think norwegians differ much from europeans/americans regarding
> interest in classical music.
>
> Then again, perhaps our attitude is different - the danes tend to make fun
> of the following:

You could tell a music is from America or from Scandinavia from its very
different tones. You can't mistaken a Gershwin from let's say,
Tchaikovski.

--
Ashikaga a27
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 10:49:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

"Ashikaga" <citizenashi@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:t2tvt77owokc$.1bio8sasag1mf$.dlg@40tude.net...
> Okay, after Amazon.com ran out of that Lindsay's version of Beethoven's
> late quartets, I ordered the Tokyo String Quartet's version instead. I
> think it's quite official that Op. 132 has to be one of my favorite
> classical pieces (and I am using "classical" inclusively). Now that would
> go with Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2 as one of my favorite
> classical
> suites. Franck's Sonata for Violin and Piano in A is also a favorite.

I don't listen to classical music all that much but I really like these:

Gustav Holst - The Planets (and I have this newsgroup to thank for pointing
me to it, too)
Mozart - Requiem
Vivaldi - Four Seasons

- GSD
Anonymous
August 2, 2005 12:34:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Eek! pibbur wrote:
> Ashikaga wrote:
<snip>
>> You could tell a music is from America or from Scandinavia from its very
>> different tones. You can't mistaken a Gershwin from let's say,
>> Tchaikovski.
>>
> //Wonders if this is a trap

I don't trap people. At least this one is an exposition, so there is no
point of doing so.

> AFAIK Tchaikovski isn't particularly scandinavian.

No. He is not. All I meant was certain musical styles are very
distinguishing because of their nationality. It has a lot to do with the
milieu and time period. Gershwin, for example, most of his most famous
works are done during the time when the U.S. was getting its international
respect from the great wars, so the undertones of his works are largely
militant and not very harmonic.

> Anyhow, they're half a century apart, which should make them easier to
> separate. What about G's contemporaries - from Wikipedia I learned that he
> was influenced by Ravel and Debussy. Not that I would recognize any of
> them unless you played "The Swan Lake", "Porgy and Bess", "Bolero"...

I am not very familiar with Ravel since I don't enjoy his work that much.
Debussy..., not a big fan either, but I've heard more of his works than
Ravel's. Can't make a proper comparison between them and Grieg, but Grieg
was heralded by Liszt as the greatest musician coming from that part of
Europe... (?). Don't mind Liszt or his words too much. He was really just
a show man. He made weird stunts like faked a faint at Chopin's recital or
persistently want to marry his daughter to Wagner.... Not to mention young
Liszt looks quite like Steve Job (when he was younger).

--
Ashikaga a27
August 3, 2005 4:39:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

I like several Russian composers' work. I'm a particular fan of
Mussorgsky -- Night on Bald Mountain and Pictures at an Exhibition
are two of my favourite classical pieces -- and also enjoy
Prokofiev's Romeo & Juliet and Peter & the Wolf a great deal.
Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture is pretty rousing as well.

Moving west, there are of course a number of Mozart and Beethoven
pieces I like -- the latter's Second Symphony particularly -- but I
must admit, Bach is more my thing. I'm also very keen on Paganini,
and even enjoy the Andrew Lloyd Webber Variations based on one of his
pieces.

Greig's Peer Gynt Suite is good value, and I'm also a bit of an Aaron
Copland fan, particularly Rodeo and Fanfare for the Common Man (I
like ELP's take on the latter, too).

The brass arrangement of Rodrigo's En Aranjuez Con Tu Amor brought
tears to my eyes when I heard it in Brassed Off! and, while we're on
the subject of films, I consider John Williams' scores to be some of
the greatest classical music to be produced this century. Henry
Mancini also came up with some great, great music.

As far as Britons are concerned, Holst is excellent -- several people
have already expressed affection for The Planets, and I'll add my
voice to theirs. A lot of our finest music is played during the BBC
Promenade concerts each year, always topped off by Elgar's Pomp and
Circumstance, and Parry's Jerusalem, both timeless anthems and
brilliant compositions.

Basically, looking at all this, I'm a basically a phillistine. I
like populist, popular stuff -- indeed more than half the pieces I've
mentioned are at least in part on a single compilation album, The
Classical Experience. I know what I like, and I'm unapologetic about
it. :) 

--

___________________________________________________________
\^\^//
,^ ( ..) Samurai Dragon -==UDIC Sig Code==-
| \ \ -==(UDIC)==- d++e+N T--Om+U146MA7'! L8u uC++
\ `^--^ \\\\\\\\//////// uF-uG++uLB+uA+nC++uR nH+nP+++
\ \ \ (2 Attentive Points) nI--nPT nS+++nT--wM-wC y+ a29
ksj ^--^ ___________________________________________________________
Anonymous
August 3, 2005 5:40:58 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Eek! Samurai wrote:
> I like several Russian composers' work. I'm a particular fan of
> Mussorgsky -- Night on Bald Mountain and Pictures at an Exhibition
> are two of my favourite classical pieces -- and also enjoy
> Prokofiev's Romeo & Juliet and Peter & the Wolf a great deal.
> Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture is pretty rousing as well.
>
> Moving west, there are of course a number of Mozart and Beethoven
> pieces I like -- the latter's Second Symphony particularly -- but I
> must admit, Bach is more my thing. I'm also very keen on Paganini,
> and even enjoy the Andrew Lloyd Webber Variations based on one of his
> pieces.

JS Bach's popular Brandenburg Concertos are very good. Beethoven..., you
have to scout for good pieces. That's part of the fun for me actually. I
like finding stuff people haven't noticed before. Though Op. 132 was
actually a popular suite among chamber musicians, according to info I
found. I was listening to Op. 131 today, and noticed the leit motifs that
appear in Op. 132. That was interesting (for me anyways). By comparison,
Op. 132 is actually the more harmonic one....

> Greig's Peer Gynt Suite is good value, and I'm also a bit of an Aaron
> Copland fan, particularly Rodeo and Fanfare for the Common Man (I
> like ELP's take on the latter, too).

GRIEG! I know it's pronounced like how you spelled it, but well..., it
feels great that I caught your typo. LOL! (*ego boosts*)

> The brass arrangement of Rodrigo's En Aranjuez Con Tu Amor brought
> tears to my eyes when I heard it in Brassed Off! and, while we're on
> the subject of films, I consider John Williams' scores to be some of
> the greatest classical music to be produced this century. Henry
> Mancini also came up with some great, great music.
>
> As far as Britons are concerned, Holst is excellent -- several people
> have already expressed affection for The Planets, and I'll add my
> voice to theirs. A lot of our finest music is played during the BBC
> Promenade concerts each year, always topped off by Elgar's Pomp and
> Circumstance, and Parry's Jerusalem, both timeless anthems and
> brilliant compositions.

Henry Purcell is excellent too. I don't know if you would consider CPE
Bach as a Briton....

> Basically, looking at all this, I'm a basically a phillistine. I
> like populist, popular stuff -- indeed more than half the pieces I've
> mentioned are at least in part on a single compilation album, The
> Classical Experience. I know what I like, and I'm unapologetic about
> it. :) 

Well, there is nothing wrong about liking populist stuff. They are popular
because lots of people like them. :-)

Actually a lot of the pieces I posted are also quite popular pieces.
Rachmaninoff's Concerto No. 2 is probably the most celebrated piece from
him (except maybe The Flight of the Bumble Bee). He personally hated that
one (because he was a perfectionist), but most people loved it. When I
heard the second movement of that piece, I thought it was a piece from
Hitchcock's Vertigo. It's highly romantic. IF you have time, I hope you
could listen to it.

--
Ashikaga a27
Anonymous
August 3, 2005 6:59:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 15:36:16 GMT, pibbur
<oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:

>On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 13:22:10 +0200, <erimess> wrote:
>
>> On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 08:44:20 GMT, pibbur
>> <oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>
>>> Igor Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring
>>> Carl Orff: Carmina Burana
>>> Gustav Holst: The Planets
>>> Leos Janacek: Glagolitic Mass
>>> Henryk Gorecki: Symphony 3 "Sorrowful Songs"
>>> Bela Bartok: The Wooden Prince
>>
>> Well, I can tell we have entirely different tastes. Though I do like
>> Mars from The Planets. (Very strange to play though.)
>>
>
>I'm mostly into progressive rock and heavy metal (satanics and monster
>cookie vocals excluded). So I guess it's only natural that I seek the
>strangeness and the disharmonics of the 20th century when it comes to
>classical music.

That might explain it. I can't stand progressive rock and heavy metal
either. :-) It would be very difficult to explain why I don't like
most of the 20th century "classical" composers -- kind of one of those
things that makes sense in my mind but couldn't explain to someone
else in words. But it's not like I dislike everything in the 20th
century -- for one thing, as time went on, music itself expanded out
much more greatly and split into a lot more different styles. So
naturally one would like some of them and not others.

>
>> Back up about a century and that's when I start liking stuff, and
>> another century and two and I like an even wider variety.
>>
>Have you listened to the Gorecki symphony?

Not likely, since I've never even *heard* of him. :-)

> I think you might like that
>one. It's a slowly developing piece, very melodic (and very sad), and it
>has a very nice vocal part. It's music to relax to, to be comforted by (I
>often listen to it when I'm sad, it feels like someone understand me).
>
>I would recommend the recording on the Elektra Nonesuch label.

I could attempt to find it at the library, just to prove whether
you're correct or not. :-) Sometimes "melodic" doesn't mean I'll like
it. I do like sad stuff though. But everything I like doesn't
necessarily have a melody and isn't necessarily relaxing.



--

Erimess Dragon
-==(UDIC)==-

d++e+NT++Om UK!1!2!3!A!L!
U+uCuFuG+++uLB+uA+ nC+nH+nP+nS++nT-xa2

This is the comfort of everyone: That tho' they
may be said to die, yet their love and devotion
are, in best sense, ever present because immortal.
~William Penn
In memory of my father, 1 Jan 05
Anonymous
August 3, 2005 7:05:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Mon, 01 Aug 2005 16:45:08 GMT, pibbur
<oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:

>On Mon, 01 Aug 2005 18:28:33 +0200, Ashikaga <citizenashi@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>> Eek! pibbur wrote:
>>> Ashikaga wrote:
>> <snip>
>>>> And another Edvard I can think of who is a Norwegian, Edvard Grieg.
>>>> Though
>>>> he was a musician. But I can totally understand why you like those
>>>> kind
>>>> of
>>>> music now. I think perhaps Norwegians like those more chaotic
>>>> dissonance
>>>> in their music.
>>>>
>>> I wouldn't think norwegians differ much from europeans/americans
>>> regarding
>>> interest in classical music.
>>>
>>> Then again, perhaps our attitude is different - the danes tend to make
>>> fun
>>> of the following:
>>
>> You could tell a music is from America or from Scandinavia from its very
>> different tones. You can't mistaken a Gershwin from let's say,
>> Tchaikovski.
>>
>//Wonders if this is a trap
>
>AFAIK Tchaikovski isn't particularly scandinavian.

He's kinda particularly Russian. :-) I love Tchaikovski. From that
era, I like him, Dvorak, Schubert, Mendellsohn... hmm, my tastes in
the 19th century don't run far. :-)

>
>Anyhow, they're half a century apart, which should make them easier to
>separate.

Half a century apart, half a world away, and in completely different
cultural times. Tchaikovsky still writing symphonies and Gershwin off
in the big world of entertainment. Entirely different things.

> What about G's contemporaries - from Wikipedia I learned that he
>was influenced by Ravel and Debussy. Not that I would recognize any of
>them unless you played "The Swan Lake", "Porgy and Bess", "Bolero"...

All three of which I like. :-) Backing up to the sentence before,
both of whom I don't like. Can't stand Debussy as a matter of fact.
Very messy music. Like Stravinsky. I don't know if that makes sense.
I don't like messy music. And, yeah, I love Porgy and Bess. :-)



--

Erimess Dragon
-==(UDIC)==-

d++e+NT++Om UK!1!2!3!A!L!
U+uCuFuG+++uLB+uA+ nC+nH+nP+nS++nT-xa2

This is the comfort of everyone: That tho' they
may be said to die, yet their love and devotion
are, in best sense, ever present because immortal.
~William Penn
In memory of my father, 1 Jan 05
Anonymous
August 3, 2005 7:07:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 18:53:27 GMT, Optician Dragon
<DragonLensman1@verizon.net> wrote:


>Synergy - Classical Gas.

Ha -- I have a piano arrangement of Classical Gas. I love playing it.


--

Erimess Dragon
-==(UDIC)==-

d++e+NT++Om UK!1!2!3!A!L!
U+uCuFuG+++uLB+uA+ nC+nH+nP+nS++nT-xa2

This is the comfort of everyone: That tho' they
may be said to die, yet their love and devotion
are, in best sense, ever present because immortal.
~William Penn
In memory of my father, 1 Jan 05
Anonymous
August 3, 2005 3:41:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Wed, 03 Aug 2005 10:08:54 +0200, <erimess> wrote:

> Interesting... out of all of these posts I'm probably more in line
> with you. Except, I still don't like some of it, and there's also way
> more I do like. So I guess the real point is that you don't seem
> total opposite to me. :-)
....>

> You don't have to apologize for your tastes. Though you are right. I
> like a lot of this stuff, but my tastes are more wide-spread, even if
> I'm the opposite of Pibbur. :-)

The world would be boring (and probably not working too well) if we were
all pibburs. A frightening thought: The world of pibburs (new thread?)

As mentioned in another thread, isn't it fascinating how different our
tastes and interests are?

--
the pibbur
Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Anonymous
August 3, 2005 8:11:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Eek! pibbur wrote:
<snip>
> The world would be boring (and probably not working too well) if we were
> all pibburs. A frightening thought: The world of pibburs (new thread?)
>
> As mentioned in another thread, isn't it fascinating how different our
> tastes and interests are?

I would really hate it if everyone's taste is the same.

--
Ashikaga a27
Anonymous
August 3, 2005 8:11:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Wed, 03 Aug 2005 16:11:16 GMT, Ashikaga <citizenashi@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Eek! pibbur wrote:
><snip>
>> The world would be boring (and probably not working too well) if we were
>> all pibburs. A frightening thought: The world of pibburs (new thread?)
>>
>> As mentioned in another thread, isn't it fascinating how different our
>> tastes and interests are?
>
>I would really hate it if everyone's taste is the same.

tastes like chicken but looks like pork.

--
The Polychromic Dragon of the -=={UDIC}==-
http://home.comcast.net/~macecil/
http://home.comcast.net/~safehex/
RGCUD Photo Gallery: http://home.comcast.net/~rgcud/
Anonymous
August 4, 2005 1:03:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Eek! Polychromic wrote:
> Ashikaga wrote:
<snip>
>>I would really hate it if everyone's taste is the same.
>
> tastes like chicken but looks like pork.

LOL!

--
Ashikaga a27
Anonymous
August 4, 2005 1:03:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Wed, 03 Aug 2005 21:03:39 GMT, Ashikaga <citizenashi@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Eek! Polychromic wrote:
>> Ashikaga wrote:
><snip>
>>>I would really hate it if everyone's taste is the same.
>>
>> tastes like chicken but looks like pork.
>
>LOL!

The slang for human meat *is* "long pork" btw.
Of course, there are a lot of sexual connotations related to that term in
some circles too.

--
The Polychromic Dragon of the -=={UDIC}==-
http://home.comcast.net/~macecil/
http://home.comcast.net/~safehex/
RGCUD Photo Gallery: http://home.comcast.net/~rgcud/
Anonymous
August 4, 2005 5:24:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Wed, 03 Aug 2005 11:41:06 GMT, pibbur
<oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:

>On Wed, 03 Aug 2005 10:08:54 +0200, <erimess> wrote:
>
>> Interesting... out of all of these posts I'm probably more in line
>> with you. Except, I still don't like some of it, and there's also way
>> more I do like. So I guess the real point is that you don't seem
>> total opposite to me. :-)
>...>
>
>> You don't have to apologize for your tastes. Though you are right. I
>> like a lot of this stuff, but my tastes are more wide-spread, even if
>> I'm the opposite of Pibbur. :-)
>
>The world would be boring (and probably not working too well) if we were
>all pibburs. A frightening thought: The world of pibburs (new thread?)
>
>As mentioned in another thread, isn't it fascinating how different our
>tastes and interests are?

Well like I've always said, it's a good thing *someone* likes to play
the tuba.



--

Erimess Dragon
-==(UDIC)==-

d++e+NT++Om UK!1!2!3!A!L!
U+uCuFuG+++uLB+uA+ nC+nH+nP+nS++nT-xa2

This is the comfort of everyone: That tho' they
may be said to die, yet their love and devotion
are, in best sense, ever present because immortal.
~William Penn
In memory of my father, 1 Jan 05
Anonymous
August 4, 2005 6:49:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 00:15:53 +0200, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
wrote:

> On Wed, 03 Aug 2005 21:03:39 GMT, Ashikaga <citizenashi@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>> Eek! Polychromic wrote:
>>> Ashikaga wrote:
>> <snip>
>>>> I would really hate it if everyone's taste is the same.
>>>
>>> tastes like chicken but looks like pork.
>>
>> LOL!
>
> The slang for human meat *is* "long pork" btw.
> Of course, there are a lot of sexual connotations related to that term in
> some circles too.
>
Poly's?


--
from pibburweorld, pibbur dragon
Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Anonymous
August 4, 2005 10:35:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Eek! Polychromic wrote:
> Ashikaga wrote:
>>Eek! Polychromic wrote:
>>> Ashikaga wrote:
<snip>
>>>>I would really hate it if everyone's taste is the same.
>>>
>>> tastes like chicken but looks like pork.
>>
>>LOL!
>
> The slang for human meat *is* "long pork" btw.
> Of course, there are a lot of sexual connotations related to that term in
> some circles too.

Didn't know that, but whatever. But then you are the one who is always
about the girth.

--
Ashikaga a27
Anonymous
August 4, 2005 3:06:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 05:11:52 -0500, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
wrote:

>On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 01:24:05 -0400, erimess wrote:
>
>>Well like I've always said, it's a good thing *someone* likes to play
>>the tuba.
>
>Oh yes, imagine the world without any tuba players! How horrific.
How could there be counterpoint to the piccolos otherwise?
-=UDIC=-
Optician Dragon
"That's the great thing about being dumb -
You don't feel bad when you don't come up with a good idea."
-"Frog" from Best Of The West
August 4, 2005 3:34:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Quoth Optician Dragon <DragonLensman1@verizon.net>:
> Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net> wrote:
>>On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 01:24:05 -0400, erimess wrote:

>>>Well like I've always said, it's a good thing *someone* likes to
>>>play the tuba.
>>
>>Oh yes, imagine the world without any tuba players! How horrific.
>
> How could there be counterpoint to the piccolos otherwise?

More to the point, you need an instrument out of which you can fire
small children.

--

___________________________________________________________
\^\^//
,^ ( ..) Samurai Dragon -==UDIC Sig Code==-
| \ \ -==(UDIC)==- d++e+N T--Om+U146MA7'! L8u uC++
\ `^--^ \\\\\\\\//////// uF-uG++uLB+uA+nC++uR nH+nP+++
\ \ \ (2 Attentive Points) nI--nPT nS+++nT--wM-wC y+ a29
ksj ^--^ ___________________________________________________________
Anonymous
August 4, 2005 3:50:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 13:06:52 +0200, Optician Dragon
<DragonLensman1@verizon.net> wrote:

> On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 05:11:52 -0500, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
> wrote:
>
>> On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 01:24:05 -0400, erimess wrote:
>>
>>> Well like I've always said, it's a good thing *someone* likes to play
>>> the tuba.
>>
>> Oh yes, imagine the world without any tuba players! How horrific.
> How could there be counterpoint to the piccolos otherwise?

Bass guitar.

--
pibbur

Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Anonymous
August 4, 2005 6:40:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

erimess wrote:
> On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 18:53:27 GMT, Optician Dragon
> <DragonLensman1@verizon.net> wrote:
>
>
> >Synergy - Classical Gas.
>
> Ha -- I have a piano arrangement of Classical Gas. I love playing it.
>

Cutely, before such things as guitar-tab arrangements were particularly
widespread, the piano arrangement of "Classical Gas" was one of the
first things that I attempted to mangle on my guitar when I took up
reading from sheet music.

Still can't handle that dodgy bit with the trumpets. >:) 
Anonymous
August 4, 2005 6:48:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Samurai wrote:
> Quoth Ashikaga <citizenashi@yahoo.com>:
> > Eek! pibbur wrote:
> ...
> >> Bass guitar.
> >
> > Is that the old rocker's solution to everything? ;-)
>
> No. That would be: more cowbell.

2! 4! 6! 8! Never too late!
Anonymous
August 4, 2005 8:04:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Eek! pibbur wrote:
> Optician Dragon wrote:
>> Polychromic wrote:
<snip>
>>> Oh yes, imagine the world without any tuba players! How horrific.
>>
>> How could there be counterpoint to the piccolos otherwise?
>
> Bass guitar.

Is that the old rocker's solution to everything? ;-)

--
Ashikaga a27
Anonymous
August 4, 2005 8:06:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Eek! Polychromic wrote:
> Erimess wrote:
>
>>Well like I've always said, it's a good thing *someone* likes to play
>>the tuba.
>
> Oh yes, imagine the world without any tuba players! How horrific.

Well, it means the world needs all kind of people. And don't laugh, I
could really imagine you with a tuba.

--
Ashikaga a27
Anonymous
August 4, 2005 9:55:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 18:04:17 +0200, Ashikaga <citizenashi@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Eek! pibbur wrote:
>> Optician Dragon wrote:
>>> Polychromic wrote:
> <snip>
>>>> Oh yes, imagine the world without any tuba players! How horrific.
>>>
>>> How could there be counterpoint to the piccolos otherwise?
>>
>> Bass guitar.
>
> Is that the old rocker's solution to everything? ;-)
>

No, that would be a heavily distorted guitar.

--
from pibburworld, pibbur dragon

Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
August 5, 2005 1:18:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Quoth Ashikaga <citizenashi@yahoo.com>:
> Eek! pibbur wrote:
....
>> Bass guitar.
>
> Is that the old rocker's solution to everything? ;-)

No. That would be: more cowbell.

--

___________________________________________________________
\^\^//
,^ ( ..) Samurai Dragon -==UDIC Sig Code==-
| \ \ -==(UDIC)==- d++e+N T--Om+U146MA7'! L8u uC++
\ `^--^ \\\\\\\\//////// uF-uG++uLB+uA+nC++uR nH+nP+++
\ \ \ (2 Attentive Points) nI--nPT nS+++nT--wM-wC y+ a29
ksj ^--^ ___________________________________________________________
Anonymous
August 5, 2005 2:40:26 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Samurai Dragon the Fortified Scaly Well-Wisher of Excellence wrote:
>I like several Russian composers' work. I'm a particular fan of
>Mussorgsky -- Night on Bald Mountain
<snicker snack>
>Basically, looking at all this, I'm a basically a phillistine. I
>like populist, popular stuff -- indeed more than half the pieces I've
>mentioned are at least in part on a single compilation album, The
>Classical Experience. I know what I like, and I'm unapologetic about
>it. :) 

My taste is a lot like Samurai's except less well refined. One of the
few pieces I can actually pick out as liking is "Night on Bald
Mountain" (aka Night on the Bare Mountain, original or
Remsky-Korsokov). I like really melodramatic stuff mostly.
--
d e+ N- T- Om++ UK!1!2!3!4!56A78!9 u uC uF- uG+ uLB+ uA nC nR nH+ nP
nI+ nPT nS+ nT- y- a26, Captain in the Cinnaguard, Weirdo, Blue Bow
[B><B], Website: http://individual.utoronto.ca/fofound
-----------
Yours Truly Saint George's Dragon
Allan Olley -==UDIC==-
-----------
"Einstein, stop telling God what to do." Neils Bohr.
Anonymous
August 5, 2005 4:16:50 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Eek! Saint George's Dragon wrote:
> I like really melodramatic stuff mostly.

I am like... mostly melodramic, really.

--
Ashikaga a27
Anonymous
August 5, 2005 5:45:37 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 16:04:17 GMT, Ashikaga <citizenashi@yahoo.com>
wrote:

>Eek! pibbur wrote:
>> Optician Dragon wrote:
>>> Polychromic wrote:
><snip>
>>>> Oh yes, imagine the world without any tuba players! How horrific.
>>>
>>> How could there be counterpoint to the piccolos otherwise?
>>
>> Bass guitar.
>
>Is that the old rocker's solution to everything? ;-)
Heavy on the backbeat.
-=UDIC=-
Optician Dragon
"That's the great thing about being dumb -
You don't feel bad when you don't come up with a good idea."
-"Frog" from Best Of The West
Anonymous
August 5, 2005 5:51:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Thu, 4 Aug 2005 22:40:26 GMT, Saint George's Dragon
<firstname_lastname@yahoo.ca> wrote:

>Samurai Dragon the Fortified Scaly Well-Wisher of Excellence wrote:
>>I like several Russian composers' work. I'm a particular fan of
>>Mussorgsky -- Night on Bald Mountain
><snicker snack>
>>Basically, looking at all this, I'm a basically a phillistine. I
>>like populist, popular stuff -- indeed more than half the pieces I've
>>mentioned are at least in part on a single compilation album, The
>>Classical Experience. I know what I like, and I'm unapologetic about
>>it. :) 
>
>My taste is a lot like Samurai's except less well refined. One of the
>few pieces I can actually pick out as liking is "Night on Bald
>Mountain" (aka Night on the Bare Mountain, original or
>Remsky-Korsokov). I like really melodramatic stuff mostly.
If you want a really different take on Night on Bald Mountain, look
for Isao Tomita's version.
-=UDIC=-
Optician Dragon
"That's the great thing about being dumb -
You don't feel bad when you don't come up with a good idea."
-"Frog" from Best Of The West
Anonymous
August 5, 2005 10:28:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Eek! Optician Dragon wrote:
<snip>
> If you want a really different take on Night on Bald Mountain, look
> for Isao Tomita's version.

You really got me interested with that above statement. I tried to find it
but no avail.... It's from the Firebird album, but there is no test
listening stuff. I heard other tracks from him, and I see it's electric
synthesizing stuff. So I'm guess it's like Night on Bald Mountain mixed
with Kitaro. :-D

--
Ashikaga a27
Anonymous
August 5, 2005 3:15:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Fri, 05 Aug 2005 06:28:45 GMT, Ashikaga <citizenashi@yahoo.com>
wrote:

>Eek! Optician Dragon wrote:
><snip>
>> If you want a really different take on Night on Bald Mountain, look
>> for Isao Tomita's version.
>
>You really got me interested with that above statement. I tried to find it
>but no avail.... It's from the Firebird album, but there is no test
>listening stuff. I heard other tracks from him, and I see it's electric
>synthesizing stuff. So I'm guess it's like Night on Bald Mountain mixed
>with Kitaro. :-D
I could rip you a low-bitrate mp3 or .ogg and send you.
-=UDIC=-
Optician Dragon
"That's the great thing about being dumb -
You don't feel bad when you don't come up with a good idea."
-"Frog" from Best Of The West
Anonymous
August 5, 2005 9:54:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Eek! Optician Dragon wrote:
> Ashikaga wrote:
>>Eek! Optician Dragon wrote:
<snip>
>>> If you want a really different take on Night on Bald Mountain, look
>>> for Isao Tomita's version.
>>
>>You really got me interested with that above statement. I tried to find it
>>but no avail.... It's from the Firebird album, but there is no test
>>listening stuff. I heard other tracks from him, and I see it's electric
>>synthesizing stuff. So I'm guess it's like Night on Bald Mountain mixed
>>with Kitaro. :-D
> I could rip you a low-bitrate mp3 or .ogg and send you.

That would be nice. :-)

--
Ashikaga a27
Anonymous
August 6, 2005 5:40:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Ashikaga wrote:
> Eek! Saint George's Dragon wrote:
> > I like really melodramatic stuff mostly.
>
> I am like... mostly melodramic, really.

*involuntarily spits beer across terminal*
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 2:50:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

<submersible@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1123360841.425862.84150@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Ashikaga wrote:
> > Eek! Saint George's Dragon wrote:
> > > I like really melodramatic stuff mostly.
> >
> > I am like... mostly melodramic, really.
>
> *involuntarily spits beer across terminal*
>
A 'spit-take' from you, Mershie? I never knew you had it in you! :D 

--

B2D, who grins, ducks, and runs really really fast. :) 
Anonymous
August 9, 2005 5:47:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Ashikaga wrote:

> Well, there is nothing wrong about liking populist stuff. They are
> popular because lots of people like them. :-)

You've never heard about King Midas then!

--
Cape Dweller Dragon
Remember, I've got a debt to pay. It's about quantity, not quality.
Anonymous
August 10, 2005 7:05:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Eek! Cape Dweller wrote:
> Ashikaga wrote:
>
>> Well, there is nothing wrong about liking populist stuff. They are
>> popular because lots of people like them. :-)
>
> You've never heard about King Midas then!

Who is him?

--
Ashikaga a27
Anonymous
August 10, 2005 7:05:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

"Ashikaga" <citizenashi@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:4dw2kurbv4wk$.qens1iuvqukg.dlg@40tude.net...
> Eek! Cape Dweller wrote:
>> Ashikaga wrote:
>>
>>> Well, there is nothing wrong about liking populist stuff. They are
>>> popular because lots of people like them. :-)
>>
>> You've never heard about King Midas then!
>
> Who is him?
>
It's gold, Ashi. Gold!

LVD
Anonymous
August 10, 2005 7:05:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Lord Vashnu Dragon wrote:

>>>> Well, there is nothing wrong about liking populist stuff. They are
>>>> popular because lots of people like them. :-)
>>>
>>> You've never heard about King Midas then!
>>
>> Who is him?
>>
> It's gold, Ashi. Gold!

True, but actually I was referring to what happened to him next. After he
cured himself of his golden touch curse he became a pilgrim. One day he
came across a music contest between Apollo and Pan. Midas said that he
liked Pan's music better, and so Apollo gave him donkey's ears in
punishment.

The moral of the story was that Apollo's music was truly better, everyone
else agreed, but Midas was too ignorant to see it, and he was also too
bold for his ignorance.

--
Cape Dweller Dragon
Remember, I've got a debt to pay. It's about quantity, not quality.
!