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Surround System Upgrade Advice Needed

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Anonymous
July 21, 2005 4:12:06 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

Hi,

I have been using my system for ages (since 1989) which consists of:

2 Technics MKII Turntables (run through an inexpensive mixer)
Denon DCM 450 CD Player
Yamaha AX700U Integrated Amp (110 W/ch) for the main speakers
Yamaha 2/4 Channel amp for the effect speakers
Yamaha DSP-3000

Main speakers are biwired Linn Nexus speakers
Effect speakers are four matching Mission bookshelf speakers (all mounted
properly up on the walls)


My problem is that the DSP-3000 has died. It emits a groaning sound at
power on and although the remote operates the unit it is emitting no sound
through any channels. The other problem is that I am not sure on whether I
should seek a repair or look at today's available equipment,

Back in the day, I wanted a system to essentially deliver the quality of the
Ramones live on a large stage or small club. I originally preferred the
analog wall of sound to the crisp delicate sound of CD with lighter music.
However, over the years, my family listens to a full range of music and now
of course DVD's for movies. Although I never got into programming
reflections into the 3000, I did create some custom environments and got
very good at matching programs to the music or mood I was in. The 3000
however was never designed nor very good for Dolby movies.

My dream is to have a system that retains the great music oriented
soundfield capacity of the 3000, but to add in the ability to use the system
for home theater (but we don't have a plasma TV and don't intend to get
one). The emphasis is still on the music at the moment.

What manufacturers and systems would you recommend that I have a look at?
Or should I just get the 3000 repaired?
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 7:38:22 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

Mark Perlsweig wrote:

> What manufacturers and systems would you recommend that I have a look at?
> Or should I just get the 3000 repaired?

I wouldn't worry too much about getting the high priced spread, or
multiple components. I just replaced my separate preamp, amps, and
surround processor with a receiver, a Pioneer VSX D814. The thing is
inexpensive, clean, and has a multitude of adjustments and modes for up
to 7.1 channel sound. I guess the Yamahas are even better - more
versatile as far as an A/V system. But sound wise, I just don't see how
you could do much better than this. I do not use the receiver's amps
because I have several Carver M-1.5s that do a job to fill a 20 x 30
foot room.

The main feature to look for is separate preamp outputs so you can use
your own amps if desired. In the meantime, hell, you can use theirs for
temporary duty on a center channel or a back surround speaker or
whatever. I am still setting up my system for surround (proper discreet
surround sound) and I appreciate this flexibility.

I also appreciate the adjustments for everything from channel balance to
speaker distance to subwoofer level and some tone control. Some of these
things even have auto room adjustment with a calibration mike, but I
prefer to roll my own.

In any case, don't turn your nose up at receivers right away.

Gary Eickmeier
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 7:15:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

"Gary Eickmeier" <geickmei@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
news:D bse3e01ook@news3.newsguy.com...
> Mark Perlsweig wrote:
>

>snip<

> The main feature to look for is separate preamp outputs so you can use
> your own amps if desired. In the meantime, hell, you can use theirs for
> temporary duty on a center channel or a back surround speaker or whatever.
> I am still setting up my system for surround (proper discreet surround
> sound) and I appreciate this flexibility.
>
> I also appreciate the adjustments for everything from channel balance to
> speaker distance to subwoofer level and some tone control. Some of these
> things even have auto room adjustment with a calibration mike, but I
> prefer to roll my own.
>
> In any case, don't turn your nose up at receivers right away.

I think you may find after experimenting, Gary, that the best feature a unit
may have is a multi-channel bypass mode, so that a SACD player can use the
power amps with only volume controlled...no digital processing at all.
Related resources
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 9:11:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

Harry Lavo wrote:

> I think you may find after experimenting, Gary, that the best feature a unit
> may have is a multi-channel bypass mode, so that a SACD player can use the
> power amps with only volume controlled...no digital processing at all.

Yes, mine happens to have stereo direct as well, but who listens in
stereo any more? Not you, Harry - ?

Gary Eickmeier
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 7:26:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

"Gary Eickmeier" <geickmei@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
news:D btto202mg3@news4.newsguy.com...
> Harry Lavo wrote:
>
>> I think you may find after experimenting, Gary, that the best feature a
>> unit may have is a multi-channel bypass mode, so that a SACD player can
>> use the power amps with only volume controlled...no digital processing at
>> all.
>
> Yes, mine happens to have stereo direct as well, but who listens in stereo
> any more? Not you, Harry - ?
>
> Gary Eickmeier

Yeah, I do. But I find I favor multichannel about 2:1 and I actually have
to force myself to look at my rows of CD's. This is especially true for
classical, but also for many of the singer-songwriters that I like.
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 7:37:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

On 23 Jul 2005 17:11:30 GMT, Gary Eickmeier <geickmei@tampabay.rr.com>
wrote:

>Harry Lavo wrote:
>
>> I think you may find after experimenting, Gary, that the best feature a unit
>> may have is a multi-channel bypass mode, so that a SACD player can use the
>> power amps with only volume controlled...no digital processing at all.
>
>Yes, mine happens to have stereo direct as well, but who listens in
>stereo any more? Not you, Harry - ?

He did say "multi-channel bypass mode."

Kal
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 10:58:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

Kalman Rubinson wrote:

> He did say "multi-channel bypass mode."

I guess I'm just not familiar enough with the equipment in question. My
receiver has analog inputs for multi channel from any other source that
has its own decoder. Is that what you're talking about? Is SAC-D a
surround system? Or just two channel?

Iggerant,

Gary Eickmeier
Anonymous
July 26, 2005 4:37:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

On 24 Jul 2005 18:58:51 GMT, Gary Eickmeier <geickmei@tampabay.rr.com>
wrote:

>Kalman Rubinson wrote:
>
>> He did say "multi-channel bypass mode."
>
>I guess I'm just not familiar enough with the equipment in question. My
>receiver has analog inputs for multi channel from any other source that
>has its own decoder. Is that what you're talking about? Is SAC-D a
>surround system? Or just two channel?

Either/both.

Kal
Anonymous
July 26, 2005 4:38:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

"Gary Eickmeier" <geickmei@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
news:D c0odb014d8@news3.newsguy.com...
> Kalman Rubinson wrote:
>
>> He did say "multi-channel bypass mode."
>
> I guess I'm just not familiar enough with the equipment in question. My
> receiver has analog inputs for multi channel from any other source that
> has its own decoder. Is that what you're talking about? Is SAC-D a
> surround system? Or just two channel?
>
> Iggerant,
>
> Gary Eickmeier

The analog multichannel inputs are bypass inputs (usually), and they are
required for SACE and DVD-A multichannel reproduction. SACD also includes a
separate stereo mix, so if you don't have multichannel setup, then just set
the SACD player to default to stereo output (two speaker setup in the setup
menu). In this case, you would either use the stereo bypass.
!