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Interconnect "Directionality"

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Anonymous
August 1, 2005 7:45:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

I recently purchased a pair of these interconnect cables because of
their "patented turbiner plugs":
http://www.audioadvisor.com/store/productdetail.asp?sku...
I'm not in to any cable hype, and purchased these simply because of
claims regarding their superior grip on RCA jacks. This does hold true
for some worn down jacks on an old amp of mine. These cables show a
preferred direction of current flow, as the picture illustrates by white
bands near one end of the cable. I recall running into claims about this
current direction flow before and am interested in what readers hear
believe about this phenomenon; true or false, and perhaps it
physico-chemical basis. Can the atoms or molecules within the conductor
be permanently aligned in particular fashion? What differences can you
expect to hear if you reverse the direction?
August 2, 2005 7:44:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

Norman M. Schwartz wrote:
> I recently purchased a pair of these interconnect cables because of
> their "patented turbiner plugs":
> http://www.audioadvisor.com/store/productdetail.asp?sku...
> I'm not in to any cable hype, and purchased these simply because of
> claims regarding their superior grip on RCA jacks. This does hold true
> for some worn down jacks on an old amp of mine. These cables show a
> preferred direction of current flow, as the picture illustrates by white
> bands near one end of the cable. I recall running into claims about this
> current direction flow before and am interested in what readers hear
> believe about this phenomenon; true or false, and perhaps it
> physico-chemical basis. Can the atoms or molecules within the conductor
> be permanently aligned in particular fashion?

The conductors are symmetrical. Current flow is AC (i.e., positive and
negative) in the interconnect cables, so there would be a big problem if
the resistances are dependent on which way current flows.

>What differences can you
> expect to hear if you reverse the direction?

No difference.
Anonymous
August 2, 2005 7:45:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

On 1 Aug 2005 15:45:24 GMT, "Norman M. Schwartz" <nmsz@optonline.net>
wrote:

>I recently purchased a pair of these interconnect cables because of
>their "patented turbiner plugs":
>http://www.audioadvisor.com/store/productdetail.asp?sku...
>I'm not in to any cable hype, and purchased these simply because of
>claims regarding their superior grip on RCA jacks. This does hold true
>for some worn down jacks on an old amp of mine. These cables show a
>preferred direction of current flow, as the picture illustrates by white
>bands near one end of the cable. I recall running into claims about this
>current direction flow before and am interested in what readers hear
>believe about this phenomenon; true or false, and perhaps it
>physico-chemical basis. Can the atoms or molecules within the conductor
>be permanently aligned in particular fashion? What differences can you
>expect to hear if you reverse the direction?

Hi Norman:
Some cable makers use a two conductor, shielded cable with the
shield connected at one end only. This type cable should have the end
with the shield connection connected to the input of the device.
For a clearer illustration of this practice, and instructions on
how to make these cables, see:
http://www.wmeckle.com/CABLE/Cable.htm
Hope this helps.

-=Bill Eckle=-
abuse@wmeckle.com
Vanity Web Page at:
http://www.wmeckle.com
Related resources
Anonymous
August 2, 2005 7:46:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

"Norman M. Schwartz" <nmsz@optonline.net> wrote in message
news:D clg2k0n52@news3.newsguy.com...
>I recently purchased a pair of these interconnect cables because of
> their "patented turbiner plugs":
> http://www.audioadvisor.com/store/productdetail.asp?sku...
> I'm not in to any cable hype, and purchased these simply because of
> claims regarding their superior grip on RCA jacks. This does hold true
> for some worn down jacks on an old amp of mine. These cables show a
> preferred direction of current flow, as the picture illustrates by white
> bands near one end of the cable. I recall running into claims about this
> current direction flow before and am interested in what readers hear
> believe about this phenomenon; true or false, and perhaps it
> physico-chemical basis. Can the atoms or molecules within the conductor
> be permanently aligned in particular fashion? What differences can you
> expect to hear if you reverse the direction?

Interconnects are often marked with a direction arrow or a marker band at
one end only. This generally indicates which cable end the screen shield is
grounded to. This avoids some possibility of ground loops occuring when
using unbalanced interconnects. Generally the marker end is used as the
source end of the interconnect, used the other way could affect screening.
Sonically I'm not aware that electrons have any preferred sense of direction
unless they have a ring around their leg ;-)

=-Mike=-
Anonymous
August 2, 2005 7:47:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

I have a number of homemade interconnects that are "directional" by
virtue of their telescoping shield. If I reverse the direction, I hear
hum or buzz...sometimes.
Anonymous
August 2, 2005 7:51:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

Some cables "could" be directional because the shield is not connected
at one end. Other than that I think the claim is BS.

---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44° 15' N - Elevation 1580')
August 2, 2005 7:52:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

Norman M. Schwartz wrote:

> I recently purchased a pair of these interconnect cables because of
> their "patented turbiner plugs":

> http://www.audioadvisor.com/store/productdetail.asp?sku...
> I'm not in to any cable hype, and purchased these simply because of
> claims regarding their superior grip on RCA jacks. This does hold true
> for some worn down jacks on an old amp of mine. These cables show a
> preferred direction of current flow, as the picture illustrates by white
> bands near one end of the cable. I recall running into claims about this
> current direction flow before and am interested in what readers hear
> believe about this phenomenon; true or false, and perhaps it
> physico-chemical basis. Can the atoms or molecules within the conductor
> be permanently aligned in particular fashion? What differences can you
> expect to hear if you reverse the direction?

Only what you will hear as a result of being told there is a difference.

I'm not poo-pooing ALL "audiophile cable" claims, by the way. For the
most part, they DO have terminations superior to those in the "grey
patch cords in the box" that come for free when you buy a component. I
think that's the most important difference. Good plugs are more
important than gaslight any time.

-J
Anonymous
August 14, 2005 7:25:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

Actually, a lot of those so called "turbine" connetors will grip so
tightly onto a jack as to break it loose from the equipment when you
try to remove it. Use that type of connector at your own risk. There
is not truth to directional current flow other than its relationship
to the shield. The shield of a better cable is connected only at one
end and the other end "floats". It has nothing to do with ground loops
as there is a separate signal ground conductor in this stype of cable.
The shield just shields the signal from Rf as noted by others. A cable
does not have to have a proper shield to be marked as directional and
as far as I know there is no law to prevent any manufacturer from
marking a simple two conductor cable with directional arrows, so buyer
beware here. I have no idea what specific cable you are using, so this
is not a comment related directly to that product, but to cable
construction in general.
-Bill
www.uptownaudio.com
Roanoke VA
(540) 343-1250

"Norman M. Schwartz" <nmsz@optonline.net> wrote in message
news:D clg2k0n52@news3.newsguy.com...
>I recently purchased a pair of these interconnect cables because of
> their "patented turbiner plugs":
> http://www.audioadvisor.com/store/productdetail.asp?sku...
> I'm not in to any cable hype, and purchased these simply because of
> claims regarding their superior grip on RCA jacks. This does hold
> true
> for some worn down jacks on an old amp of mine. These cables show a
> preferred direction of current flow, as the picture illustrates by
> white
> bands near one end of the cable. I recall running into claims about
> this
> current direction flow before and am interested in what readers hear
> believe about this phenomenon; true or false, and perhaps it
> physico-chemical basis. Can the atoms or molecules within the
> conductor
> be permanently aligned in particular fashion? What differences can
> you
> expect to hear if you reverse the direction?
Anonymous
August 15, 2005 12:29:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

"Uptown Audio" <uptownaudio@rev.net> wrote in message
news:D dnnp201nmr@news1.newsguy.com...
> Actually, a lot of those so called "turbine" connetors will grip so
> tightly onto a jack as to break it loose from the equipment when you
> try to remove it. Use that type of connector at your own risk.


This is not idle chat. I've already pulled apart two different female rca
jacks using these terminators.

>snip, irrelevant to above<
August 16, 2005 3:23:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

Harry Lavo wrote:
> "Uptown Audio" <uptownaudio@rev.net> wrote in message
> news:D dnnp201nmr@news1.newsguy.com...
>
>>Actually, a lot of those so called "turbine" connetors will grip so
>>tightly onto a jack as to break it loose from the equipment when you
>>try to remove it. Use that type of connector at your own risk.
>
>
>
> This is not idle chat. I've already pulled apart two different female rca
> jacks using these terminators.


I third that motion. It's not as likely a scenario with higher end gear
that has the rca jacks bolted to the chassis, but I have ruined 2
inexpensive pieces of equipment when those "turbines" were in a
deathgrip with the connectors that were just soldered to the internal pc
board and poking through the chassis. I had a bunch of monster cable
laying around that I retrofitted with cardas ends for that reason.

Cheers,
Anonymous
August 17, 2005 3:30:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

"Ritz" <ritz@mordor.net> wrote in message
news:D dr8570trs@news2.newsguy.com...
> Harry Lavo wrote:
>> "Uptown Audio" <uptownaudio@rev.net> wrote in message
>> news:D dnnp201nmr@news1.newsguy.com...
>>
>>>Actually, a lot of those so called "turbine" connetors will grip so
>>>tightly onto a jack as to break it loose from the equipment when you
>>>try to remove it. Use that type of connector at your own risk.
>>
>>
>>
>> This is not idle chat. I've already pulled apart two different female
>> rca
>> jacks using these terminators.
>
>
> I third that motion. It's not as likely a scenario with higher end gear
> that has the rca jacks bolted to the chassis, but I have ruined 2
> inexpensive pieces of equipment when those "turbines" were in a deathgrip
> with the connectors that were just soldered to the internal pc board and
> poking through the chassis. I had a bunch of monster cable laying around
> that I retrofitted with cardas ends for that reason.
>
The Monster Cable 550i with "turbiner" plugs I've been using have been on
and off the jacks of several pieces of equipment, that I can I recall;
Bryston 4BSST, Marchand 2 way crossover, and ancient Audio Research SP-3 and
GAS Ampzilla II, without any failures. (The cable was originally intended
for the older pieces having worn jacks.) The intuitive precaution which I
observed was to rotate plugs about 180 degrees clock-wise and counter
clock-wise while withdrawing it in small stages from the jack. While I
suspect that the other seasoned audiophiles who responded here did
similarly, the plug does make a tight grip, BUT that is it's intended use.
Not for the plug, I would never have bought the cable. Instead I limit
myself to the flimsy stuff that comes packaged along with equipment,
purchased in Home Depot and National Liquidator, and if I'm in a (cable)
spending mood, Radio Shack.
!