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New Orleans

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Anonymous
September 2, 2005 5:14:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

I haven't seen anything about the hurricane/the flood in the southern part
of the US here, yet. But I'm not sure that my newsfeed is working as it
should. Things seem to be very slow here at the moment.

Anyhow, from what I see on TV (CNN), it's a disaster. A city about the
size of our capital, almost completely (80%) under water. A total
destruction of the infrastructure. Thing are going to be very difficult
for a long time. FWIW: my condolances to my fellow american dragons. I
hope you're all safe.

--
pibbur

Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/

More about : orleans

Anonymous
September 2, 2005 5:14:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Fri, 02 Sep 2005 13:14:24 GMT, pibbur
<oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:

>I haven't seen anything about the hurricane/the flood in the southern part
>of the US here, yet. But I'm not sure that my newsfeed is working as it
>should. Things seem to be very slow here at the moment.
>
>Anyhow, from what I see on TV (CNN), it's a disaster. A city about the
>size of our capital, almost completely (80%) under water. A total
>destruction of the infrastructure. Thing are going to be very difficult
>for a long time. FWIW: my condolances to my fellow american dragons. I
>hope you're all safe.

All we see on TV (I still have one in the living room) is coverage of New
Orleans and the other cities affected. It was bound to happen. Each time
a hurricane would come towards that area, people would make comments about
how fragile that city was. Building a city on the delta of a huge river,
in a bowl-shaped depression, next to the sea, in the way of hurricanes,
populating it with interesting but mostly very poor people and having only
a couple narrow ways out of the city was not the greatest idea in the
world.

How many people here have been to New Orleans? I've been there several
times, but never for Mardi Gras.

interNIC.com is still hosting sites from the middle of downtown. They're
in a 10 story building with their own diesel generator and are protected
from looters by the fact that the lower floors are being used as a staging
area for the national guardsmen.
If you want to listen to the Astrodome command center you can tune Winamp
to http://216.14.30.229:8002/.
--
The Polychromic Dragon of the -=={UDIC}==-
http://home.comcast.net/~macecil/
http://home.comcast.net/~safehex/
RGCUD Photo Gallery: http://home.comcast.net/~rgcud/
Anonymous
September 2, 2005 6:46:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

> How many people here have been to New Orleans? I've been there several

I was born outside of New Orleans, but I forget which parish. We later
moved to Shreveport. I was pretty young when we were there so I don't
remember very much about it.

I'm in another state now so I was unaffected by the hurricane aside from
gas price fluctuations and such.

From what I've seen on the news the Big Easy looks like a total
disaster area.

--
/\_./b__ _O_ <====o Lost Dragon o====> _|_ __d\._/\
(/^/(_^^' | I like people - I just can't eat a whole one | `^^_)\^\)
.._,(_;)_ <===o http://www.lostdragon.com/ o===> _(;_),_.
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Anonymous
September 3, 2005 2:15:57 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

"pibbur" <oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote in message
news:o p.swg8dogcuioorg@nessus...

> Anyhow, from what I see on TV (CNN), it's a disaster. A city about
> the size of our capital, almost completely (80%) under water. A
> total destruction of the infrastructure. Thing are going to be very
> difficult for a long time. FWIW: my condolances to my fellow
> american dragons. I hope you're all safe.

I have been gawking at images of destruction all week. Apparently
today food and supplies finally started arriving. But the hurricane
was several days ago. Some of the things I wonder:

a) why the shelters lacked adequate supplies for an predictable
calamity?

b) why anyone chose to stay at home and not go to shelters or leave
town when the mandatory evacuation was ordered?

c) Why were citizens left to arrange their own means for evacuation;
that is, why was there no transportation already established to move
people out of the city or to shelters in the city? Why was there
anyone stuck begging for rides from their neighbors?

d) why it wasn't raining rations and supplies the minute it was safe
enough to fly airlifts over the city?

e) After 9/11, there was enormous pressure on making the government
much more responsive to huge disasters. One would think Katrina would
be the place where this heightened ability to respond would be
showcased, but all we see is incompetence.

f) It seems like anyone should have expected a city infamous for its
crime rates to explode in a fury of looting and roaming gangs, such as
the one that evicted all the residents of a nursing home that had
adequately prepared for a week but had neglected to buy guns for staff
to defend the building. Why are police "outgunned" and "undermanned"?

Will the response be this awful the next time terrorists strike, or
the next time a massive earthquake impacts California? If the
government can't prepare adequately for very predictable disasters,
what about the unpredictable ones?

Oy.

-Ophidian
Anonymous
September 3, 2005 2:17:42 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

> interNIC.com is still hosting sites from the middle of downtown.
> They're
> in a 10 story building with their own diesel generator and are
> protected
> from looters by the fact that the lower floors are being used as a
> staging
> area for the national guardsmen.
> If you want to listen to the Astrodome command center you can tune
> Winamp
> to http://216.14.30.229:8002/.

Evidently they have exceeded their Bellsouth bandwidth!

-Ophidian
Anonymous
September 3, 2005 7:55:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sat, 03 Sep 2005 04:15:57 +0200, Zac Bond <zacwbond@vt.edu> wrote:

>
> "pibbur" <oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote in message
> news:o p.swg8dogcuioorg@nessus...
>
>> Anyhow, from what I see on TV (CNN), it's a disaster. A city about
>> the size of our capital, almost completely (80%) under water. A
>> total destruction of the infrastructure. Thing are going to be very
>> difficult for a long time. FWIW: my condolances to my fellow
>> american dragons. I hope you're all safe.
>
> I have been gawking at images of destruction all week. Apparently
> today food and supplies finally started arriving. But the hurricane
> was several days ago. Some of the things I wonder:
>
> a) why the shelters lacked adequate supplies for an predictable
> calamity?
>
> b) why anyone chose to stay at home and not go to shelters or leave
> town when the mandatory evacuation was ordered?
>
> c) Why were citizens left to arrange their own means for evacuation;
> that is, why was there no transportation already established to move
> people out of the city or to shelters in the city? Why was there
> anyone stuck begging for rides from their neighbors?
>
> d) why it wasn't raining rations and supplies the minute it was safe
> enough to fly airlifts over the city?
>
> e) After 9/11, there was enormous pressure on making the government
> much more responsive to huge disasters. One would think Katrina would
> be the place where this heightened ability to respond would be
> showcased, but all we see is incompetence.
>
> f) It seems like anyone should have expected a city infamous for its
> crime rates to explode in a fury of looting and roaming gangs, such as
> the one that evicted all the residents of a nursing home that had
> adequately prepared for a week but had neglected to buy guns for staff
> to defend the building. Why are police "outgunned" and "undermanned"?
>
When the infrastructure of an entire city is destroyed, a certain degree
of chaos is inevitable. But from what you describe, I understand that this
goes far beyond that.

> Will the response be this awful the next time terrorists strike, or
> the next time a massive earthquake impacts California? If the
> government can't prepare adequately for very predictable disasters,
> what about the unpredictable ones?
>

Well said.

> Oy.

Dark tower?

--
pibbur
Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Anonymous
September 6, 2005 12:23:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

"Zac Bond" <zacwbond@vt.edu> earned a wedgie by saying:

>
>"pibbur" <oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote in message
>news:o p.swg8dogcuioorg@nessus...
>
>> Anyhow, from what I see on TV (CNN), it's a disaster. A city about
>> the size of our capital, almost completely (80%) under water. A
>> total destruction of the infrastructure. Thing are going to be very
>> difficult for a long time. FWIW: my condolances to my fellow
>> american dragons. I hope you're all safe.
>
>I have been gawking at images of destruction all week. Apparently
>today food and supplies finally started arriving. But the hurricane
>was several days ago. Some of the things I wonder:
>
>b) why anyone chose to stay at home and not go to shelters or leave
>town when the mandatory evacuation was ordered?

Well, a little investigation showed that they actually couldn't get
anywhere in time. The last census (2000) showed that a vast majority
of the residents in New Orleans are completely dependent on mass
transit systems and don't have personal transportation. They managed
to get a couple bus loads of people out, but when they turned around
to try to go back for more, the storm had already struck and the buses
couldn't get through, what with the roads being washed away and all.
Poor planning on the city's part? Probably. It seems a little bit like
class warfare.

One of the more interesting things I've heard was a congressman (I
believe it was Dennis Hastert) saying that he questions the wisdom of
spending billions to rebuild a city that's seven feet below sea level.
When you think about it, that actually seems logical...coming from a
politician.

And with the focus on New Orleans, a lot of people don't remember that
there were other towns in the way of Katrina, too. At least one, Bond,
Mississippi, as been completely wiped off the map, with not one
building left standing.

--
Dalboz Dragon -=(UDIC and Grass Growth Analyst of dANIP)=-
AIM: BeerStud362
ICQ: 14285834
Dispenser of the Holy *SMACK!* (Not to be confused with *SLAP*)
--------------
d+++ e+ N+ T+ Om+ U1!2!47'S'9!K!L u- uC+ uF- uG++ uLB+ uA+
nC++ nH nP+ nI++ nPT nS+ nT o oA+++ y+++ a27
--------------
"Holy Flurking Schnit!" - Kang
Anonymous
September 6, 2005 3:07:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Tue, 06 Sep 2005 10:23:11 +0200, Dalboz Dragon <someone@somewhere.net>
wrote:

> "Zac Bond" <zacwbond@vt.edu> earned a wedgie by saying:
>
>>
>> "pibbur" <oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote in message
>> news:o p.swg8dogcuioorg@nessus...
....

> And with the focus on New Orleans, a lot of people don't remember that
> there were other towns in the way of Katrina, too. At least one, Bond,
> Mississippi, as been completely wiped off the map, with not one
> building left standing.
>
Yes, I just saw it on the news today - there are a lot of small towns
severely affected by the storm, and they (that is the inhabitants) fear
they will be overlooked.

That's the problem with the "information society", some catastrophes get
the intention of the media while others, just as serious, are forgotten.

In 1995 there was an outbreak of Ebola haemorrhagic fever in Zaire, about
250 people died. Huge hadlines in (at least norwegian) news media. But
every year sleeping sickness kills around 40,000 in Africa. No mention at
all.


--
pibbur who at the moment is not part of any catastrophe, although he does
have a cat

Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Anonymous
September 6, 2005 5:49:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Tue, 06 Sep 2005 11:07:11 GMT, pibbur
<oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:

>In 1995 there was an outbreak of Ebola haemorrhagic fever in Zaire, about
>250 people died. Huge hadlines in (at least norwegian) news media. But
>every year sleeping sickness kills around 40,000 in Africa. No mention at
>all.

Well, Ebola is a contagious disease and was in the news at the time
already from several books and movies. The Tsetse fly has been biting
people in that area for a long time - hardly news anymore. That is why
it's called "new"s. I doubt we'll hear much more about Katrina after
another week or two. We already never hear about the tsunami anymore but
I doubt the areas affected by that have recovered.
--
The Polychromic Dragon of the -=={UDIC}==-
http://home.comcast.net/~macecil/
http://home.comcast.net/~safehex/
RGCUD Photo Gallery: http://home.comcast.net/~rgcud/
Anonymous
September 6, 2005 11:12:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Tue, 06 Sep 2005 08:23:11 GMT, someone@somewhere.net (Dalboz
Dragon) wrote:

>"Zac Bond" <zacwbond@vt.edu> earned a wedgie by saying:
>
>
>One of the more interesting things I've heard was a congressman (I
>believe it was Dennis Hastert) saying that he questions the wisdom of
>spending billions to rebuild a city that's seven feet below sea level.
>When you think about it, that actually seems logical...coming from a
>politician.

I'm probably gonna get some flack for this, but it *is* logical.
Coming from a non-politician (and someone who would make a terrible
politician at that -- I'm too honest). If this was a disaster waiting
to happen and "predictable," why create it again? Exactly why *would*
you spent billions to rebuild such a city? I wonder if people are too
busy being emotional to even think logically.

I'm not particularly fond of my tax money, when I can hardly afford
taxes to begin with, goes to places that are predictably unstable and
people are too dumb to move elsewhere. It's a little like a neighbor
not fixing a leak in their roof and then expecting everyone else to
help when stuff in her house gets damaged.

Sorry, but I've gotten to the point I'm having a hard time feeling
sorry for all these hurricane victims, or the earthquakes in CA. In a
totally unusual area is different... I have a particularly big issue
with people like this lady I know who got hit by the hurricanes in
Florida last year and made some comment about knowing "how to handle
it" just like always... so if you've had hurricanes there so often,
why the hell are you still there? Don't feel the least bit sorry for
her, nope.


--

Erimess Dragon
-==(UDIC)==-

d++e+NT++Om UK!1!2!3!A!L!
U+uCuFuG+++uLB+uA+ nC+nH+nP+nS++nT-xa4

This is the comfort of everyone: That tho' they
may be said to die, yet their love and devotion
are, in best sense, ever present because immortal.
~William Penn
In memory of my father, 1 Jan 05
Anonymous
September 7, 2005 9:27:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

"Dalboz Dragon" <someone@somewhere.net> wrote in message
news:431d4d8f.116943156@news1.news.adelphia.net...

>>b) why anyone chose to stay at home and not go to shelters or leave
>>town when the mandatory evacuation was ordered?
>
> Well, a little investigation showed that they actually couldn't get
> anywhere in time. The last census (2000) showed that a vast majority
> of the residents in New Orleans are completely dependent on mass

Well, I meant either going to one of the shelters inside the city, if
they can't actually leave the city.

Of course, since the "shelters" were unsupplied and unprepared it
didn't matter much, but 'in theory' going to the superdome and the
civic center should have been possible for everyone--or more to the
point, it should have been MADE possible by virtue of public
transportation, etc.

It does seem absurd for the city to say, "you have to evacuate...but
you gotta organize your own means."

Awful planning + incompetent response = even bigger disaster...

-Ophidian
!