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Surgery

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Anonymous
September 6, 2005 11:25:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Well, I'm finally being cut open for the first time in my life. I'm
way behind the rest of my family as they were all cut open years and
years ago.

Fairly minor thing. I have a cyst on my lower left rib cage. I
originally thought I could have it done in-office at my family doctor,
as my brother gets these fatty cysts too and he had one removed there.
But mine's bigger and in a bad location, so my doctor sent me off to a
surgeon. Then the surgeon didn't want to do it in-office either, so
he's having me go to a surgical center. (It's out-patient surgery
only, and much cheaper than a hospital.) So this just got more
complicated every time I talked to the next person down the line.

Never been knocked out before either so that seems weird. It's what
they call "conscious sedation," which the lady described to me as
being like when you're sort of half-dozing off to sleep. I'll be
sub-consciously aware and just a barely fuzzy consciously aware. They
say I'll be able to answer questions and stuff, but won't remember
anything later. Probably like when someone insists I said something
(logical) in my sleep and I don't remember later. :-)

This is for this Friday. I admit to being very nervous, OK maybe to
the point of scared. :-) Even though it's minor. But I don't like
the unknown and don't like being out of control, and this is both.
Also not sure what shape I'll be in afterwards. I won't be open to do
much, which is why I'm trying to catch up on some stuff this week, but
will be sitting a lot... which gives me ample opportunity to get on
here and bug the hell out of everyone. :-) I'm not sure if I'll be in
a lot of pain -- I take pain fairly well, but with its location I'll
have to be very careful about movement and pulling on it. Try doing
*anything* without pulling on your ribcage sometime as it's very
difficult.


--

Erimess Dragon
-==(UDIC)==-

d++e+NT++Om UK!1!2!3!A!L!
U+uCuFuG+++uLB+uA+ nC+nH+nP+nS++nT-xa4

This is the comfort of everyone: That tho' they
may be said to die, yet their love and devotion
are, in best sense, ever present because immortal.
~William Penn
In memory of my father, 1 Jan 05

More about : surgery

Anonymous
September 7, 2005 12:12:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Tue, 06 Sep 2005 19:25:23 -0400, erimess wrote:

>Well, I'm finally being cut open for the first time in my life. I'm
>way behind the rest of my family as they were all cut open years and
>years ago.
>
>Fairly minor thing. I have a cyst on my lower left rib cage. I
>originally thought I could have it done in-office at my family doctor,
>as my brother gets these fatty cysts too and he had one removed there.
>But mine's bigger and in a bad location, so my doctor sent me off to a
>surgeon. Then the surgeon didn't want to do it in-office either, so
>he's having me go to a surgical center. (It's out-patient surgery
>only, and much cheaper than a hospital.) So this just got more
>complicated every time I talked to the next person down the line.
>
>Never been knocked out before either so that seems weird. It's what
>they call "conscious sedation," which the lady described to me as
>being like when you're sort of half-dozing off to sleep. I'll be
>sub-consciously aware and just a barely fuzzy consciously aware. They
>say I'll be able to answer questions and stuff, but won't remember
>anything later. Probably like when someone insists I said something
>(logical) in my sleep and I don't remember later. :-)
>
>This is for this Friday. I admit to being very nervous, OK maybe to
>the point of scared. :-) Even though it's minor. But I don't like
>the unknown and don't like being out of control, and this is both.
>Also not sure what shape I'll be in afterwards. I won't be open to do
>much, which is why I'm trying to catch up on some stuff this week, but
>will be sitting a lot... which gives me ample opportunity to get on
>here and bug the hell out of everyone. :-) I'm not sure if I'll be in
>a lot of pain -- I take pain fairly well, but with its location I'll
>have to be very careful about movement and pulling on it. Try doing
>*anything* without pulling on your ribcage sometime as it's very
>difficult.

Well good luck. Since it's out patient surgery and you're not being fully
sedated, I'd guess the risks are pretty minimal. Be sure to let them know
what things you're allergic to and afterwards when you've gotten your
prescriptions filled you might want to check online for the possible side
effects and other drug interactions before taking the meds. (Of course,
you're young and probably aren't already on a lot of meds so that
shouldn't be a problem.)

I hope they don't need to use any surgical mesh material. That stuff
causes more problems than the surgery itself.
--
The Polychromic Dragon of the -=={UDIC}==-
http://home.comcast.net/~macecil/
http://home.comcast.net/~safehex/
RGCUD Photo Gallery: http://home.comcast.net/~rgcud/
Anonymous
September 7, 2005 6:41:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Tue, 06 Sep 2005 19:25:23 -0400, erimess wrote:

>Well, I'm finally being cut open for the first time in my life. I'm
>way behind the rest of my family as they were all cut open years and
>years ago.
>
>Fairly minor thing. I have a cyst on my lower left rib cage. I
>originally thought I could have it done in-office at my family doctor,
>as my brother gets these fatty cysts too and he had one removed there.
>But mine's bigger and in a bad location, so my doctor sent me off to a
>surgeon. Then the surgeon didn't want to do it in-office either, so
>he's having me go to a surgical center. (It's out-patient surgery
>only, and much cheaper than a hospital.) So this just got more
>complicated every time I talked to the next person down the line.

I have one just below my left rib cage. Mostly doesn't bother me
unless I lean forward just wrong. It's about the size of a large
grape.

>Never been knocked out before either so that seems weird. It's what
>they call "conscious sedation," which the lady described to me as
>being like when you're sort of half-dozing off to sleep. I'll be
>sub-consciously aware and just a barely fuzzy consciously aware. They
>say I'll be able to answer questions and stuff, but won't remember
>anything later. Probably like when someone insists I said something
>(logical) in my sleep and I don't remember later. :-)

That's what they used on me for my colonoscopy. Never felt a thing,
couldn't remember 99% of it anyway. Just count backward fron 99. Ok
99, 9....it's over?

>>This is for this Friday. I admit to being very nervous, OK maybe to
>the point of scared. :-) Even though it's minor. But I don't like
>the unknown and don't like being out of control, and this is both.
>Also not sure what shape I'll be in afterwards. I won't be open to do
>much, which is why I'm trying to catch up on some stuff this week, but
>will be sitting a lot... which gives me ample opportunity to get on
>here and bug the hell out of everyone. :-) I'm not sure if I'll be in
>a lot of pain -- I take pain fairly well, but with its location I'll
>have to be very careful about movement and pulling on it. Try doing
>*anything* without pulling on your ribcage sometime as it's very
>difficult.
It'll be interesting listening to you after taking the pain pills. :-)
--
Optician Dragon
-=UDIC=-
"There is no cause so right that one cannot find a fool following it."
Larry Niven
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Anonymous
September 7, 2005 10:18:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Wed, 07 Sep 2005 02:41:01 GMT, Optician Dragon
<dragonlensman1@verizon.net> wrote:


>
>That's what they used on me for my colonoscopy. Never felt a thing,
>couldn't remember 99% of it anyway. Just count backward fron 99. Ok
>99, 9....it's over?

Now I like the sounds of that.

>
>>>This is for this Friday. I admit to being very nervous, OK maybe to
>>the point of scared. :-) Even though it's minor. But I don't like
>>the unknown and don't like being out of control, and this is both.
>>Also not sure what shape I'll be in afterwards. I won't be open to do
>>much, which is why I'm trying to catch up on some stuff this week, but
>>will be sitting a lot... which gives me ample opportunity to get on
>>here and bug the hell out of everyone. :-) I'm not sure if I'll be in
>>a lot of pain -- I take pain fairly well, but with its location I'll
>>have to be very careful about movement and pulling on it. Try doing
>>*anything* without pulling on your ribcage sometime as it's very
>>difficult.
>It'll be interesting listening to you after taking the pain pills. :-)

I'll be sure to post then so that I can go back later and see how much
I embarrassed myself. (Not that I can't do that under normal
circumstances.) Actually, the only prescription pain meds I've ever
had was Vicadin and it didn't have any side effects at all.

I'm not even supposed to be on here. I just got done tutoring and
figured as long as I was online... But I have a billion things that
need done over the next two days and I still have another shift to
work tonight. (Had to do some trading for Friday.)



--

Erimess Dragon
-==(UDIC)==-

d++e+NT++Om UK!1!2!3!A!L!
U+uCuFuG+++uLB+uA+ nC+nH+nP+nS++nT-xa4

This is the comfort of everyone: That tho' they
may be said to die, yet their love and devotion
are, in best sense, ever present because immortal.
~William Penn
In memory of my father, 1 Jan 05
Anonymous
September 7, 2005 10:26:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Tue, 06 Sep 2005 20:12:40 -0500, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
wrote:


>
>Well good luck. Since it's out patient surgery and you're not being fully
>sedated, I'd guess the risks are pretty minimal. Be sure to let them know
>what things you're allergic to and afterwards when you've gotten your
>prescriptions filled you might want to check online for the possible side
>effects and other drug interactions before taking the meds. (Of course,
>you're young and probably aren't already on a lot of meds so that
>shouldn't be a problem.)

Huh - don't count on it. It's not like I have 10 pill bottles like my
dad did but I do have 3 prescription meds. (One only taken here and
there as needed.) I also have a pill book that I'm digging into all
the time so no need to look anything up online. The biggest problem
would be a combination of too many downers and just totally zonking me
out. Which I wouldn't mind. :-) And I have zippo (known) allergies
-- makes a lot of things much easier.

>
>I hope they don't need to use any surgical mesh material. That stuff
>causes more problems than the surgery itself.

What the heck is that? He only told me the bare basics of what he
would be doing, and I know he's doing inside disolvable stitches.



--

Erimess Dragon
-==(UDIC)==-

d++e+NT++Om UK!1!2!3!A!L!
U+uCuFuG+++uLB+uA+ nC+nH+nP+nS++nT-xa4

This is the comfort of everyone: That tho' they
may be said to die, yet their love and devotion
are, in best sense, ever present because immortal.
~William Penn
In memory of my father, 1 Jan 05
Anonymous
September 8, 2005 3:18:50 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Wed, 07 Sep 2005 18:26:25 -0400, erimess wrote:

>On Tue, 06 Sep 2005 20:12:40 -0500, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
>wrote:
>
>>I hope they don't need to use any surgical mesh material. That stuff
>>causes more problems than the surgery itself.
>
>What the heck is that? He only told me the bare basics of what he
>would be doing, and I know he's doing inside disolvable stitches.

Sometimes when they work on the lower torso or abdomen, they use some mesh
material to reinforce the muscle wall when they seal the wound back up.
Unfortunately it has lots of side effects like adhesions and makes
subsequent surgeries more complex. However, it's mostly used with large
incisions like a bowel resection so I guess you're safe in that regard.
--
The Polychromic Dragon of the -=={UDIC}==-
http://home.comcast.net/~macecil/
http://home.comcast.net/~safehex/
RGCUD Photo Gallery: http://home.comcast.net/~rgcud/
September 8, 2005 4:11:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Quoth erimess:
> Well, I'm finally being cut open for the first time in my life.
> I'm way behind the rest of my family as they were all cut open
> years and years ago.
....

I'm still surgery-free, so I can imagine the first time must be
slightly daunting. I'm sure it'll be fine, though. :) 

--

___________________________________________________________
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Anonymous
September 8, 2005 4:37:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

erimess wrote:
> Well, I'm finally being cut open for the first time in my life. I'm
> way behind the rest of my family as they were all cut open years and
> years ago.

Well, I don't have much to add, but I hope it goes well.

--
JP Morris - aka DOUG the Eagle (Dragon) -=UDIC=- jpm@it-he.org
Fun things to do with the Ultima games http://www.it-he.org
Developing a U6/U7 clone http://ire.it-he.org
d+++ e+ N+ T++ Om U1234!56!7'!S'!8!9!KA u++ uC+++ uF+++ uG---- uLB----
uA--- nC+ nR---- nH+++ nP++ nI nPT nS nT wM- wC- y a(YEAR - 1976)
Anonymous
September 8, 2005 7:29:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Wed, 07 Sep 2005 01:25:23 +0200, <erimess> wrote:

> Well, I'm finally being cut open for the first time in my life. I'm
> way behind the rest of my family as they were all cut open years and
> years ago.
>
> Fairly minor thing. I have a cyst on my lower left rib cage. I
> originally thought I could have it done in-office at my family doctor,
> as my brother gets these fatty cysts too and he had one removed there.
> But mine's bigger and in a bad location, so my doctor sent me off to a
> surgeon. Then the surgeon didn't want to do it in-office either, so
> he's having me go to a surgical center. (It's out-patient surgery
> only, and much cheaper than a hospital.) So this just got more
> complicated every time I talked to the next person down the line.
>
> Never been knocked out before either so that seems weird. It's what
> they call "conscious sedation," which the lady described to me as
> being like when you're sort of half-dozing off to sleep. I'll be
> sub-consciously aware and just a barely fuzzy consciously aware. They
> say I'll be able to answer questions and stuff, but won't remember
> anything later. Probably like when someone insists I said something
> (logical) in my sleep and I don't remember later. :-)
>
> This is for this Friday. I admit to being very nervous, OK maybe to
> the point of scared. :-) Even though it's minor. But I don't like
> the unknown and don't like being out of control, and this is both.
> Also not sure what shape I'll be in afterwards. I won't be open to do
> much, which is why I'm trying to catch up on some stuff this week, but
> will be sitting a lot... which gives me ample opportunity to get on
> here and bug the hell out of everyone. :-) I'm not sure if I'll be in
> a lot of pain -- I take pain fairly well, but with its location I'll
> have to be very careful about movement and pulling on it. Try doing
> *anything* without pulling on your ribcage sometime as it's very
> difficult.
>
>
I've only been under full-narcosis surgery (when I said goodbye to my
very inflamed appendix). But I've been on the other side regarding
"consious narcosis". That is, when I worked at our x-ray department. Often
we had to take samples for microscopic analysis from the liver, kidneys or
or other deep tissues. Usually the patient was given an injection of
morphine and a tranquilizer an hour or so before the procedure, and we
applied local anesthesia before penetrating the skin. I can't remember any
patient complaining during the procedure, although I'm sure many were
nervous before we started.

Which is perfectly understandable. Although minor surgery is, from a
strict medical point of view, standard procedure, and not very
complicated, you give up control while things are being done to your body.

In my experience it usually helps if the doctor explains what he/she is
going to do. So unless that makes you uncomfortable I suggest you ask them
to explain exactly what they're going to do.

Best wishes.

pibbur

BTW - don't be shocked if they, during the procedure, talk about
everything else between themselves. It doesn't mean they're not
concentrated.

Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Anonymous
September 8, 2005 10:50:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Thu, 08 Sep 2005 15:29:02 GMT, pibbur
<oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:

>
>Which is perfectly understandable. Although minor surgery is, from a
>strict medical point of view, standard procedure, and not very
>complicated, you give up control while things are being done to your body.
>

Yup, exactly.

>In my experience it usually helps if the doctor explains what he/she is
>going to do. So unless that makes you uncomfortable I suggest you ask them
>to explain exactly what they're going to do.

Actually, I don't think I want to know. They can explain afterwards,
which might even fascinate me. I'm about as far from squeemish as you
can get, and most medical/dental, etc. procedures don't bother me,
other than just being a hassle and waste of time. :-) But for some
reason I'm finding this bothers me. And even if they told me details,
I'll still be out of control and I think that bothers me a lot.

>
>BTW - don't be shocked if they, during the procedure, talk about
>everything else between themselves. It doesn't mean they're not
>concentrated.

I'm not supposed to remember anything later anyway but... I worked for
a vet two summers in high school so I saw plenty of this. And a lot
of other very strange things. (The day the anesthesia machine was
leaking was probably the most fun. That was a *long* time ago.) It
may have been animals but I still know the kinds of things that go on
during surgery. Actually, I wonder if there's an issue with that.
Most people see someone prior, and then see them groggily waking up
later, nothing in between. I've seen cats and dogs with holes in
them, and 10 minutes later they're waking up in the recovery area, and
I just saw them with a slit in them 10 minutes ago, and for the first
time in my life I really made the connection to the fact that they
just had that slit in them and someone was playing with their innards.
It was weird getting used to. I'm sure you understand this feeling.
:-)


--

Erimess Dragon
-==(UDIC)==-

d++e+NT++Om UK!1!2!3!A!L!
U+uCuFuG+++uLB+uA+ nC+nH+nP+nS++nT-xa4

This is the comfort of everyone: That tho' they
may be said to die, yet their love and devotion
are, in best sense, ever present because immortal.
~William Penn
In memory of my father, 1 Jan 05
Anonymous
September 9, 2005 1:52:48 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Thu, 08 Sep 2005 15:29:02 GMT, pibbur
<oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:

>On Wed, 07 Sep 2005 01:25:23 +0200, <erimess> wrote:
>Snip
>> much, which is why I'm trying to catch up on some stuff this week, but
>> will be sitting a lot... which gives me ample opportunity to get on
>> here and bug the hell out of everyone. :-) I'm not sure if I'll be in
>> a lot of pain -- I take pain fairly well, but with its location I'll
>> have to be very careful about movement and pulling on it. Try doing
>> *anything* without pulling on your ribcage sometime as it's very
>> difficult.
>>
>>
>I've only been under full-narcosis surgery (when I said goodbye to my
>very inflamed appendix). But I've been on the other side regarding
>"consious narcosis". That is, when I worked at our x-ray department. Often
>we had to take samples for microscopic analysis from the liver, kidneys or
>or other deep tissues. Usually the patient was given an injection of
>morphine and a tranquilizer an hour or so before the procedure, and we
>applied local anesthesia before penetrating the skin. I can't remember any
>patient complaining during the procedure, although I'm sure many were
>nervous before we started.
>
>Which is perfectly understandable. Although minor surgery is, from a
>strict medical point of view, standard procedure, and not very
>complicated, you give up control while things are being done to your body.
>
>In my experience it usually helps if the doctor explains what he/she is
>going to do. So unless that makes you uncomfortable I suggest you ask them
>to explain exactly what they're going to do.
>
>Best wishes.
>
>pibbur
>
>BTW - don't be shocked if they, during the procedure, talk about
>everything else between themselves. It doesn't mean they're not
>concentrated.
>

Yes, remember doctors and hospital workers have very unique senses of
humour.
"You give me any more trouble, old man, and I'll tie your catheter to
my leg and take a walk!"
I had a friend who actually said that to a cantankerous old man one
day while he was an orderly.
--
Optician Dragon
-=UDIC=-
"There is no cause so right that one cannot find a fool following it."
Larry Niven
Anonymous
September 9, 2005 9:57:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Well, I'm still alive. To begin with, everyone was really, really nice. The
nurses were very helpful. The anestheologist actually came in and talked to me
and told me what he'd be doing. I didn't even figure on talking to him at all
so that was a surprise. Then the surgeon came in and drew pictures on me. :-)

The most difficult moment beforehand was after everyone had come to visit and I
was left with about 20 minutes alone to sit and watch a fluid drip in me and get
nervous. (Hey, same kind of fluids I give my cat. Now I know what that big
needle feels like going in.)

Another scary moment was walking into the surgery room itself. It was very cold
(now I know what that warm blanket was for), and it just kinda spooked me out
walking in there. However, once I layed down and they got me all comfy, I
noticed about 30 seconds later that I was getting dizzy. I said as much and
asked if that was normal and they said yes. And I said I didn't remember
drinking that much the night before. :-)

And then I was waking up. That blew me away. I couldn't have been in the
operating room more than 2 minutes before I was out, and I didn't slowly doze
off or anything. My memory just cuts off abruptly. I don't even know how they
got anything in me. The sheet I saw said subcutaneous but all I had in me was
an IV... so I dunno. They're sneaky. :-) And the surgeon said I was really out
and apparently couldn't semi-consciously answer questions and stuff like I was
supposed to be able to do. It might have something to do with only getting
about 2 hours of sleep.

Had to go to the bathroom after... I remember being in there (someone had to
come in with me and by that time any kind of discretion didn't even seem to
matter)... and suddenly I was waking up *again* in a different area, and my
brother was there. I don't know what happened there... again just an abrupt
lack of memory. Unfortunately that wasn't a good experience because I started
feeling panicky, like I couldn't breath and my chest felt all weird. I have
anxiety problems but I didn't expect it to kick in *afterwards.* They had to
give me some...er, I think Ativan.

Then just as abruptly, I was feeling much better, feeling little pain (more a
bit discomfort) and wide awake and ready to go home. Well, not home. I'm over
at my brother's. When I was feeling the anxiety my brother felt pretty strongly
that I'd feel better just getting the heck out of there.

I've been tending to get tired very, very suddenly, like in 30 seconds flat I
just can't keep awake, and then when I wake up I'm really awake like nothing's
going on. It's strange. Obviously I'm in one of my awake periods. I already
about threw up once either cause of the Vicadin or just a delayed reaction.
Lack of sleep, anesthesia, nasty pain pills, not much food, body being screwed
with. I could see where I could feel sick. Vicadin's never done that to me
before. Speaking of which, I'm about due for one and I need to stay on top of
them cause that pain sneaks up quickly.

I'm now discovering this recovery is going to be worse/longer than I thought.
For one, even though I knew it was difficult to do a lot of stuff without moving
my rib cage, I just didn't quite realize exactly how impossible it is not to
move it. I can't do anything with my left arm. I'm having a hell of time
dressing, getting out of chairs, etc. I can stand and walk around just fine.
After experimenting, finally discovered a good sleeping position, and it was a
surprise that I think I'm better off on the couch cause having the back to
support me helps.

The doctor told my brother (he told him a fair amount but I don't remember any
of it) that it could be a good 4 - 6 weeks before I can really move around well
again. I will definitely be sitting a lot. I can't stay off work forever so
any amount of moving I can manage will have to be concentrated there, and at
home just do as little as possible. Well, that's what games are for, huh? And
I can stay up nights thinking of junk to waste my time writing on here. :-)

I think one of those sleepy spells is coming on... I hope I can get through the
actual message I meant to get on here to write. Actually, I don't think I
can... oh well, see ya next round of wakefulness.
Anonymous
September 10, 2005 12:25:00 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On 9 Sep 2005 17:57:34 -0700, erimess <erimess_member@newsguy.com> wrote:

>Well, I'm still alive.

*claps*

>And then I was waking up.

Too bad Gaseous isn't here to make comments about the procedure.

>That blew me away. I couldn't have been in the
>operating room more than 2 minutes before I was out, and I didn't slowly doze
>off or anything. My memory just cuts off abruptly. I don't even know how they
>got anything in me. The sheet I saw said subcutaneous but all I had in me was
>an IV... so I dunno. They're sneaky. :-) And the surgeon said I was really out
>and apparently couldn't semi-consciously answer questions and stuff like I was
>supposed to be able to do. It might have something to do with only getting
>about 2 hours of sleep.

Were you supposed to be NPO or anything before the procedure? Going
without food can make you react more strongly to drugs as well.

>Had to go to the bathroom after... I remember being in there (someone had to
>come in with me and by that time any kind of discretion didn't even seem to
>matter)... and suddenly I was waking up *again* in a different area, and my
>brother was there. I don't know what happened there... again just an abrupt
>lack of memory. Unfortunately that wasn't a good experience because I started
>feeling panicky, like I couldn't breath and my chest felt all weird. I have
>anxiety problems but I didn't expect it to kick in *afterwards.* They had to
>give me some...er, I think Ativan.

Yowsa. Well, now that you're not panicky be sure to check the back of
your neck for alien implants. Of course, don't take it out or you'll get
brain cancer like Scully.

>I think one of those sleepy spells is coming on... I hope I can get through the
>actual message I meant to get on here to write. Actually, I don't think I
>can... oh well, see ya next round of wakefulness.

Nighty nite.
--
The Polychromic Dragon of the -=={UDIC}==-
http://home.comcast.net/~macecil/
http://home.comcast.net/~safehex/
RGCUD Photo Gallery: http://home.comcast.net/~rgcud/
Anonymous
September 10, 2005 6:38:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On 9 Sep 2005 17:57:34 -0700, erimess <erimess_member@newsguy.com>
wrote:

>Well, I'm still alive. To begin with, everyone was really, really nice. The
>nurses were very helpful. The anestheologist actually came in and talked to me
>and told me what he'd be doing. I didn't even figure on talking to him at all
>so that was a surprise. Then the surgeon came in and drew pictures on me. :-)
>
>The most difficult moment beforehand was after everyone had come to visit and I
>was left with about 20 minutes alone to sit and watch a fluid drip in me and get
>nervous. (Hey, same kind of fluids I give my cat. Now I know what that big
>needle feels like going in.)
>
>Another scary moment was walking into the surgery room itself. It was very cold
>(now I know what that warm blanket was for), and it just kinda spooked me out
>walking in there. However, once I layed down and they got me all comfy, I
>noticed about 30 seconds later that I was getting dizzy. I said as much and
>asked if that was normal and they said yes. And I said I didn't remember
>drinking that much the night before. :-)
>
Because you drank too much to remember? :-)

>And then I was waking up. That blew me away. I couldn't have been in the
>operating room more than 2 minutes before I was out, and I didn't slowly doze
>off or anything. My memory just cuts off abruptly. I don't even know how they
>got anything in me. The sheet I saw said subcutaneous but all I had in me was
>an IV... so I dunno. They're sneaky. :-) And the surgeon said I was really out
>and apparently couldn't semi-consciously answer questions and stuff like I was
>supposed to be able to do. It might have something to do with only getting
>about 2 hours of sleep.

I'll have to say the recent anasthesias are far better than my early
experience. I was 5 when I slid down a backyard slide and another kid
ran down behind me and rear-ended me. Normally not a problem, but it
pitched me forward onto a pile of broken fireplace brick from where
the people were putting in a fireplace. Cut my head over my left front
hairline all the way down to bone, scraping and fracturing it, whilst
also merrily slicing through a major artery up there.I walked home
squirting blood and my parents made record time to the hospital, where
I got 11 stitches inside to repair the artery and 11 more on the skin
- no time for anasthesia.That was the first time I died. But I
recovered. Later I had plastic surgery on the scar to reduce the size
and they used ....ether! With that stuff, you wake up vomiting, and
when you swallow your own spit, you puke again. Continue for 24 hours.
When I had a colonoscopy a few years ago, I ws in the prep room, all
"dressed" and I ws wondering when I ws going to get the knockout
stuff. They wheeled me into the room, and I could see the monitors and
everything, and still..nothing. Then they must have put it in the IV
because the next thing I knew they were done.

>
>I'm now discovering this recovery is going to be worse/longer than I thought.
>For one, even though I knew it was difficult to do a lot of stuff without moving
>my rib cage, I just didn't quite realize exactly how impossible it is not to
>move it. I can't do anything with my left arm. I'm having a hell of time
>dressing, getting out of chairs, etc. I can stand and walk around just fine.
>After experimenting, finally discovered a good sleeping position, and it was a
>surprise that I think I'm better off on the couch cause having the back to
>support me helps.
Funny how much stuff is connected to the rib-bone.

>The doctor told my brother (he told him a fair amount but I don't remember any
>of it) that it could be a good 4 - 6 weeks before I can really move around well
>again. I will definitely be sitting a lot. I can't stay off work forever so
>any amount of moving I can manage will have to be concentrated there, and at
>home just do as little as possible. Well, that's what games are for, huh? And
>I can stay up nights thinking of junk to waste my time writing on here. :-)
>
>I think one of those sleepy spells is coming on... I hope I can get through the
>actual message I meant to get on here to write. Actually, I don't think I
>can... oh well, see ya next round of wakefulness.
Yeah, but you'll be feeling noticeably better in 2 to 3 weeks.
Good recovery to you!

--
Optician Dragon
-=UDIC=-
"There is no cause so right that one cannot find a fool following it."
Larry Niven
Anonymous
September 10, 2005 6:13:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sat, 10 Sep 2005 02:57:34 +0200, erimess <erimess_member@newsguy.com>
wrote:

> Well, I'm still alive. To begin with, everyone was really, really
> nice. The
> nurses were very helpful. The anestheologist actually came in and
> talked to me
> and told me what he'd be doing. I didn't even figure on talking to him
> at all
> so that was a surprise. Then the surgeon came in and drew pictures on
> me. :-)
>
> The most difficult moment beforehand was after everyone had come to
> visit and I
> was left with about 20 minutes alone to sit and watch a fluid drip in me
> and get
> nervous. (Hey, same kind of fluids I give my cat. Now I know what that
> big
> needle feels like going in.)
>
> Another scary moment was walking into the surgery room itself. It was
> very cold
> (now I know what that warm blanket was for), and it just kinda spooked
> me out
> walking in there. However, once I layed down and they got me all comfy,
> I
> noticed about 30 seconds later that I was getting dizzy. I said as much
> and
> asked if that was normal and they said yes. And I said I didn't remember
> drinking that much the night before. :-)
>
> And then I was waking up. That blew me away. I couldn't have been in
> the
> operating room more than 2 minutes before I was out, and I didn't slowly
> doze
> off or anything. My memory just cuts off abruptly. I don't even know
> how they
> got anything in me. The sheet I saw said subcutaneous but all I had in
> me was
> an IV... so I dunno. They're sneaky. :-) And the surgeon said I was
> really out
> and apparently couldn't semi-consciously answer questions and stuff like
> I was
> supposed to be able to do. It might have something to do with only
> getting
> about 2 hours of sleep.
>
> Had to go to the bathroom after... I remember being in there (someone
> had to
> come in with me and by that time any kind of discretion didn't even seem
> to
> matter)... and suddenly I was waking up *again* in a different area, and
> my
> brother was there. I don't know what happened there... again just an
> abrupt
> lack of memory. Unfortunately that wasn't a good experience because I
> started
> feeling panicky, like I couldn't breath and my chest felt all weird. I
> have
> anxiety problems but I didn't expect it to kick in *afterwards.* They
> had to
> give me some...er, I think Ativan.
>
> Then just as abruptly, I was feeling much better, feeling little pain
> (more a
> bit discomfort) and wide awake and ready to go home. Well, not home.
> I'm over
> at my brother's. When I was feeling the anxiety my brother felt pretty
> strongly
> that I'd feel better just getting the heck out of there.
>
> I've been tending to get tired very, very suddenly, like in 30 seconds
> flat I
> just can't keep awake, and then when I wake up I'm really awake like
> nothing's
> going on. It's strange. Obviously I'm in one of my awake periods. I
> already
> about threw up once either cause of the Vicadin or just a delayed
> reaction.
> Lack of sleep, anesthesia, nasty pain pills, not much food, body being
> screwed
> with. I could see where I could feel sick. Vicadin's never done that
> to me
> before. Speaking of which, I'm about due for one and I need to stay on
> top of
> them cause that pain sneaks up quickly.
>
> I'm now discovering this recovery is going to be worse/longer than I
> thought.
> For one, even though I knew it was difficult to do a lot of stuff
> without moving
> my rib cage, I just didn't quite realize exactly how impossible it is
> not to
> move it. I can't do anything with my left arm. I'm having a hell of
> time
> dressing, getting out of chairs, etc. I can stand and walk around just
> fine.
> After experimenting, finally discovered a good sleeping position, and it
> was a
> surprise that I think I'm better off on the couch cause having the back
> to
> support me helps.
>
> The doctor told my brother (he told him a fair amount but I don't
> remember any
> of it) that it could be a good 4 - 6 weeks before I can really move
> around well
> again. I will definitely be sitting a lot. I can't stay off work
> forever so
> any amount of moving I can manage will have to be concentrated there,
> and at
> home just do as little as possible. Well, that's what games are for,
> huh? And
> I can stay up nights thinking of junk to waste my time writing on here.
> :-)
>
> I think one of those sleepy spells is coming on... I hope I can get
> through the
> actual message I meant to get on here to write. Actually, I don't think
> I
> can... oh well, see ya next round of wakefulness.
>
Glad to hear you're OK. Surgery is a traume to the body, although under
controlled conditions. Healing demands a lot of resources - which means
there is less left for activity, staying awake and such. The drugs used
during the procedure also contribute, although they should be out of yopur
body by now.

--
pibbur

Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Anonymous
September 10, 2005 6:34:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sat, 10 Sep 2005 04:38:03 +0200, Optician Dragon
<dragonlensman1@verizon.net> wrote:

...>
> I'll have to say the recent anasthesias are far better than my early
> experience. I was 5 when I slid down a backyard slide and another kid
> ran down behind me and rear-ended me. Normally not a problem, but it
> pitched me forward onto a pile of broken fireplace brick from where
> the people were putting in a fireplace. Cut my head over my left front
> hairline all the way down to bone, scraping and fracturing it, whilst
> also merrily slicing through a major artery up there.I walked home
> squirting blood and my parents made record time to the hospital, where
> I got 11 stitches inside to repair the artery and 11 more on the skin
> - no time for anasthesia.That was the first time I died. But I
> recovered. Later I had plastic surgery on the scar to reduce the size
> and they used ....ether!

Ahh, the good ol' days of ether - not! I've had an aquiantance with that
one to when I was 5. Had to remove a some adenoid vegetations (don't know
the english term from the upper part of my nasal cavity. The smell was
awful, so I decided to pretend I had gone to sleep, to make them stop.
Today I'm glad they weren't fooled.

Ether wasn't entirely safe, and it was flammable too. Much more suited for
killing frogs for experiments. (I had to do that once when I was a general
prctitioner in a small "town" north in Nprway. A student had an assigmnent
involving a frog, and sought assistance. Not a usual task for a country
doctor, but it went well - not for the frong, of course).

> With that stuff, you wake up vomiting, and
> when you swallow your own spit, you puke again. Continue for 24 hours.
> When I had a colonoscopy a few years ago, I ws in the prep room, all
> "dressed" and I ws wondering when I ws going to get the knockout
> stuff. They wheeled me into the room, and I could see the monitors and
> everything, and still..nothing. Then they must have put it in the IV
> because the next thing I knew they were done.
>

You may have recived Pentothal. It's an extremely quick narcosis agent,
works within seconds. You're under just for a couple of minutes though, so
used alone it's only suited for short-term procedures such as electroshock
to the head for depression or to the heart for converting certain therapy
resistant cardiac arrythmias. (Not the serious life-threateing ones, for
those no anesthesia is needed as the patient is unconcious, in some cases
clinically dead). For surgical procedures it's used to induce narcosis,
thereafter other agents take over. Of course, Gaseous know more about this
than I.

I remember before my appendicectomia someone said: "Now you'll go to
sl...". In went agent P. SNAP! Then I found myself in a dark room, didn't
know where I was. And why did all those people try hold me down. Hey, if
you wanna fight, then we'll fight. In the background I heard some say
"Give him more Ketogan". When I woke up again, the sun was shining,
everybody was happy and....

It wans't like I had been sleeping, more like a couple of hours had
suddenly disappeared.
--
pibbur, the appendix-less dragon

Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Anonymous
September 11, 2005 3:09:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sat, 10 Sep 2005 14:13:01 GMT, pibbur
<oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:


>>
>Healing demands a lot of resources - which means
>there is less left for activity, staying awake and such.

Well, I'm being a bad girl. I slept reasonably well last night --
woke up a fair amount but got right back to sleep. But then I woke up
after only 6-1/2 hours of sleep and couldn't get back to sleep,
finally gave up and got up. And haven't been back to bed since. So I
never even got my 8 hours sleep last night, let alone any naps or
resting today. I've been online and was on the phone with my brother
for quite a while. He finally yelled at me to go take a nap. He told
me yesterday I was running around the house entirely too much.

My other brother has had surgery several times and I would always yell
at him cause he was up doing stuff he wasn't supposed to be doing, and
now I'm doing the same thing. :-) I do actually feel a *whole* lot
better than I did yesterday, but I have a bad habit of overdoing. So
I'm going to be good and go take that nap in a few minutes.

Really, right now this thing ITCHES more than it hurts!!


--

Erimess Dragon
-==(UDIC)==-

d++e+NT++Om UK!1!2!3!A!L!
U+uCuFuG+++uLB+uA+ nC+nH+nP+nS++nT-xa4

This is the comfort of everyone: That tho' they
may be said to die, yet their love and devotion
are, in best sense, ever present because immortal.
~William Penn
In memory of my father, 1 Jan 05
Anonymous
September 11, 2005 3:09:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sat, 10 Sep 2005 23:09:46 -0400, erimess wrote:

>Really, right now this thing ITCHES more than it hurts!!

Those are the little mites that have gotten into the wound. Soon they
will make it to your brain...but fire will burn them out.

/makes evil suggestion
--
The Polychromic Dragon of the -=={UDIC}==-
http://home.comcast.net/~macecil/
http://home.comcast.net/~safehex/
RGCUD Photo Gallery: http://home.comcast.net/~rgcud/
Anonymous
September 11, 2005 11:53:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 05:41:10 +0200, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
wrote:

> On Sat, 10 Sep 2005 23:09:46 -0400, erimess wrote:
>
>> Really, right now this thing ITCHES more than it hurts!!
>
> Those are the little mites that have gotten into the wound. Soon they
> will make it to your brain...but fire will burn them out.
>
This is what we professionals generally refer to as bacteriae and fever.
:-)

> /makes evil suggestion

You're like my father. He, too, makes a lot of diagnoses. All of them
wrong. :-) Now all you need is grey hair and a beard, and I might start
calling you "Daddy".

And to Erimess: Itching is perfectly normal, despite Poly's vivid
suggestions.


--
pibbur

Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Anonymous
September 11, 2005 11:53:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 07:53:09 GMT, pibbur
<oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:

>On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 05:41:10 +0200, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
>wrote:
>
>> On Sat, 10 Sep 2005 23:09:46 -0400, erimess wrote:
>>
>>> Really, right now this thing ITCHES more than it hurts!!
>>
>> Those are the little mites that have gotten into the wound. Soon they
>> will make it to your brain...but fire will burn them out.
>>
>This is what we professionals generally refer to as bacteriae and fever.
>:-)
>
>> /makes evil suggestion
>
>You're like my father. He, too, makes a lot of diagnoses. All of them
>wrong. :-) Now all you need is grey hair and a beard, and I might start
>calling you "Daddy".
>
>And to Erimess: Itching is perfectly normal, despite Poly's vivid
>suggestions.

Don't believe him. Evil little glow-in-the-dark mites, released from
million year old hibernation in the ice by global warming are in your
wound. They probably were hiding in your keyboard waiting to pounce into
an open wound. If they get into your brain you will be under their
control.

By the way, have you had any strange cravings since you got home? That is
the first sign they have reached your brain!!!
--
The Polychromic Dragon of the -=={UDIC}==-
http://home.comcast.net/~macecil/
http://home.comcast.net/~safehex/
RGCUD Photo Gallery: http://home.comcast.net/~rgcud/
Anonymous
September 11, 2005 2:50:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 12:06:27 +0200, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
wrote:

> On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 07:53:09 GMT, pibbur
> <oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:
>
>> On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 05:41:10 +0200, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> On Sat, 10 Sep 2005 23:09:46 -0400, erimess wrote:
>>>
>>>> Really, right now this thing ITCHES more than it hurts!!
>>>
>>> Those are the little mites that have gotten into the wound. Soon they
>>> will make it to your brain...but fire will burn them out.
>>>
>> This is what we professionals generally refer to as bacteriae and fever.
>> :-)
>>
>>> /makes evil suggestion
>>
>> You're like my father. He, too, makes a lot of diagnoses. All of them
>> wrong. :-) Now all you need is grey hair and a beard, and I might start
>> calling you "Daddy".
>>
>> And to Erimess: Itching is perfectly normal, despite Poly's vivid
>> suggestions.
>
> Don't believe him. Evil little glow-in-the-dark mites, released from
> million year old hibernation in the ice by global warming are in your
> wound. They probably were hiding in your keyboard waiting to pounce into
> an open wound. If they get into your brain you will be under their
> control.
>
> By the way, have you had any strange cravings since you got home? That
> is
> the first sign they have reached your brain!!!

Stange cravings in women are in my experience (restricted to 2 occasions)
a sign of something growing in their womb. not in their brain. It's called
children.

WARNING: Things you don't need and possibly don't want to know coming:

In medical latin we have 2 words for the womb. "Uterus" is latin. The
other word is "hysteris", and is actually (old) greek, but we still call
it latin, we're not picky. My daughter, who has studied "real" latin,
laughs at me whenever I refer to doctorspeak as latin.

We use the terms somewhat interchangeably, although we try to maintain
some rules. We refer to the blood supply for said organ as "arteriae
uterinae" (the uterine arteries), while for instance removing it is
referred to as a "hysterectomy".

The term "hysteria" comes from the greek term, and is derived from the
idea that this mental condition was caused by irregular movements of blood
from the hysteris to the brain (I'll give you this one for free:
"cerebrum" (latin), "encephalon" (greek)). Obviously from this theory
hysteria could only affect women. To be honest, I think anyone would be a
bit on the edge if they knew their internal organs were moving around.
With the exception of the bowels, of course, they normally move around a
bit, but they USUALLY STAY WITHIN THE ABDOMEN.

END of WARNING
--
pibbur sapiens

Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Anonymous
September 11, 2005 7:49:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sat, 10 Sep 2005 23:09:46 -0400, erimess wrote:

>On Sat, 10 Sep 2005 14:13:01 GMT, pibbur
><oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:
>
>
>>>
>>Healing demands a lot of resources - which means
>>there is less left for activity, staying awake and such.
>
>Well, I'm being a bad girl. I slept reasonably well last night --
>woke up a fair amount but got right back to sleep. But then I woke up
>after only 6-1/2 hours of sleep and couldn't get back to sleep,
>finally gave up and got up. And haven't been back to bed since. So I
>never even got my 8 hours sleep last night, let alone any naps or
>resting today. I've been online and was on the phone with my brother
>for quite a while. He finally yelled at me to go take a nap. He told
>me yesterday I was running around the house entirely too much.
>
>My other brother has had surgery several times and I would always yell
>at him cause he was up doing stuff he wasn't supposed to be doing, and
>now I'm doing the same thing. :-) I do actually feel a *whole* lot
>better than I did yesterday, but I have a bad habit of overdoing. So
>I'm going to be good and go take that nap in a few minutes.
>
>Really, right now this thing ITCHES more than it hurts!!
Well, the best way to stop that is to pour some salt on the incision.
:-)
--
Optician Dragon
-=UDIC=-
"There is no cause so right that one cannot find a fool following it."
Larry Niven
Anonymous
September 11, 2005 7:49:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 15:49:05 GMT, Optician Dragon
<dragonlensman1@verizon.net> wrote:

>On Sat, 10 Sep 2005 23:09:46 -0400, erimess wrote:
>
>>On Sat, 10 Sep 2005 14:13:01 GMT, pibbur
>><oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>>
>>>Healing demands a lot of resources - which means
>>>there is less left for activity, staying awake and such.
>>
>>Well, I'm being a bad girl. I slept reasonably well last night --
>>woke up a fair amount but got right back to sleep. But then I woke up
>>after only 6-1/2 hours of sleep and couldn't get back to sleep,
>>finally gave up and got up. And haven't been back to bed since. So I
>>never even got my 8 hours sleep last night, let alone any naps or
>>resting today. I've been online and was on the phone with my brother
>>for quite a while. He finally yelled at me to go take a nap. He told
>>me yesterday I was running around the house entirely too much.
>>
>>My other brother has had surgery several times and I would always yell
>>at him cause he was up doing stuff he wasn't supposed to be doing, and
>>now I'm doing the same thing. :-) I do actually feel a *whole* lot
>>better than I did yesterday, but I have a bad habit of overdoing. So
>>I'm going to be good and go take that nap in a few minutes.
>>
>>Really, right now this thing ITCHES more than it hurts!!
>Well, the best way to stop that is to pour some salt on the incision.
>:-)

Yay for salted scabs!

/prefers HCL in the wound however. Salty AND burny.
--
The Polychromic Dragon of the -=={UDIC}==-
http://home.comcast.net/~macecil/
http://home.comcast.net/~safehex/
RGCUD Photo Gallery: http://home.comcast.net/~rgcud/
Anonymous
September 11, 2005 7:53:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 10:50:22 GMT, pibbur
<oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:

>On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 12:06:27 +0200, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
>wrote:
>
>> On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 07:53:09 GMT, pibbur
>> <oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:
>>
>>> On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 05:41:10 +0200, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> On Sat, 10 Sep 2005 23:09:46 -0400, erimess wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Really, right now this thing ITCHES more than it hurts!!
>>>>
>>>> Those are the little mites that have gotten into the wound. Soon they
>>>> will make it to your brain...but fire will burn them out.
>>>>
>>> This is what we professionals generally refer to as bacteriae and fever.
>>> :-)
>>>
>>>> /makes evil suggestion
>>>
>>> You're like my father. He, too, makes a lot of diagnoses. All of them
>>> wrong. :-) Now all you need is grey hair and a beard, and I might start
>>> calling you "Daddy".
>>>
>>> And to Erimess: Itching is perfectly normal, despite Poly's vivid
>>> suggestions.
>>
>> Don't believe him. Evil little glow-in-the-dark mites, released from
>> million year old hibernation in the ice by global warming are in your
>> wound. They probably were hiding in your keyboard waiting to pounce into
>> an open wound. If they get into your brain you will be under their
>> control.
>>
>> By the way, have you had any strange cravings since you got home? That
>> is
>> the first sign they have reached your brain!!!
>
>Stange cravings in women are in my experience (restricted to 2 occasions)
>a sign of something growing in their womb. not in their brain. It's called
>children.
>
>WARNING: Things you don't need and possibly don't want to know coming:
>
>In medical latin we have 2 words for the womb. "Uterus" is latin. The
>other word is "hysteris", and is actually (old) greek, but we still call
>it latin, we're not picky. My daughter, who has studied "real" latin,
>laughs at me whenever I refer to doctorspeak as latin.
>
>We use the terms somewhat interchangeably, although we try to maintain
>some rules. We refer to the blood supply for said organ as "arteriae
>uterinae" (the uterine arteries), while for instance removing it is
>referred to as a "hysterectomy".
>
>The term "hysteria" comes from the greek term, and is derived from the
>idea that this mental condition was caused by irregular movements of blood
> from the hysteris to the brain (I'll give you this one for free:
>"cerebrum" (latin), "encephalon" (greek)). Obviously from this theory
>hysteria could only affect women. To be honest, I think anyone would be a
>bit on the edge if they knew their internal organs were moving around.
>With the exception of the bowels, of course, they normally move around a
>bit, but they USUALLY STAY WITHIN THE ABDOMEN.
>
>END of WARNING
Yay for mesenteries!!

ANOTHER WARNING!!!




I learned in biology class that frogs don't have mesenteries so you
could kill one by merely holding it head-down and wait for it's guts
to fall out of it's mouth.

--
Optician Dragon
-=UDIC=-
"There is no cause so right that one cannot find a fool following it."
Larry Niven
Anonymous
September 11, 2005 9:54:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 17:53:57 +0200, Optician Dragon
<dragonlensman1@verizon.net> wrote:

> On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 10:50:22 GMT, pibbur
> <oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:
>
>> On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 12:06:27 +0200, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 07:53:09 GMT, pibbur
>>> <oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:
>>>
>>>> On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 05:41:10 +0200, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> On Sat, 10 Sep 2005 23:09:46 -0400, erimess wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> Really, right now this thing ITCHES more than it hurts!!
>>>>>
>>>>> Those are the little mites that have gotten into the wound. Soon
>>>>> they
>>>>> will make it to your brain...but fire will burn them out.
>>>>>
>>>> This is what we professionals generally refer to as bacteriae and
>>>> fever.
>>>> :-)
>>>>
>>>>> /makes evil suggestion
>>>>
>>>> You're like my father. He, too, makes a lot of diagnoses. All of them
>>>> wrong. :-) Now all you need is grey hair and a beard, and I might
>>>> start
>>>> calling you "Daddy".
>>>>
>>>> And to Erimess: Itching is perfectly normal, despite Poly's vivid
>>>> suggestions.
>>>
>>> Don't believe him. Evil little glow-in-the-dark mites, released from
>>> million year old hibernation in the ice by global warming are in your
>>> wound. They probably were hiding in your keyboard waiting to pounce
>>> into
>>> an open wound. If they get into your brain you will be under their
>>> control.
>>>
>>> By the way, have you had any strange cravings since you got home? That
>>> is
>>> the first sign they have reached your brain!!!
>>
>> Stange cravings in women are in my experience (restricted to 2
>> occasions)
>> a sign of something growing in their womb. not in their brain. It's
>> called
>> children.
>>
>> WARNING: Things you don't need and possibly don't want to know coming:
>>
>> In medical latin we have 2 words for the womb. "Uterus" is latin. The
>> other word is "hysteris", and is actually (old) greek, but we still call
>> it latin, we're not picky. My daughter, who has studied "real" latin,
>> laughs at me whenever I refer to doctorspeak as latin.
>>
>> We use the terms somewhat interchangeably, although we try to maintain
>> some rules. We refer to the blood supply for said organ as "arteriae
>> uterinae" (the uterine arteries), while for instance removing it is
>> referred to as a "hysterectomy".
>>
>> The term "hysteria" comes from the greek term, and is derived from the
>> idea that this mental condition was caused by irregular movements of
>> blood
>> from the hysteris to the brain (I'll give you this one for free:
>> "cerebrum" (latin), "encephalon" (greek)). Obviously from this theory
>> hysteria could only affect women. To be honest, I think anyone would be
>> a
>> bit on the edge if they knew their internal organs were moving around.
>> With the exception of the bowels, of course, they normally move around a
>> bit, but they USUALLY STAY WITHIN THE ABDOMEN.
>>
>> END of WARNING
> Yay for mesenteries!!
>
> ANOTHER WARNING!!!
>
>
>
>
> I learned in biology class that frogs don't have mesenteries so you
> could kill one by merely holding it head-down and wait for it's guts
> to fall out of it's mouth.
>
I can see how that can be useful.

OK, a couple of more warnings, I don't take responsible for anything and
any similarities between living persons is coincidental.

You know of course that the mesenteries extend past the intestines, to
create the great oment (omentum majus). Lying as a carpet in front of the
intestines it can encapsulate infections, and thus avoid a general spread
of the infection into the peritoneum (the thin layer covering the organs
in the abdomen, and since we speak of it, also construct the mesenteries).
You don't want a diffuse peritonits. Period.

Did you BTW know that the peritoneum also can restrain the bleeding from a
ruptured aorta? Useful.

This thread is surely developing into something. Be warned that I'm
practically immune to yecchi things! (unless you're asked to eat them, but
that's an entriely story).

--
pibbur, raptor wannabe

Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Anonymous
September 11, 2005 9:54:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 17:54:08 GMT, pibbur
<oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:

>This thread is surely developing into something. Be warned that I'm
>practically immune to yecchi things! (unless you're asked to eat them, but
>that's an entriely story).

Yay for mesenteries, they are tasty!
--
The Polychromic Dragon of the -=={UDIC}==-
http://home.comcast.net/~macecil/
http://home.comcast.net/~safehex/
RGCUD Photo Gallery: http://home.comcast.net/~rgcud/
Anonymous
September 12, 2005 12:35:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Eek! pibbur wrote:
> Polychromic wrote:
<snip>
>> By the way, have you had any strange cravings since you got home? That
>> is the first sign they have reached your brain!!!
>
> Stange cravings in women are in my experience (restricted to 2 occasions)
> a sign of something growing in their womb. not in their brain. It's called
> children.
>
> WARNING: Things you don't need and possibly don't want to know coming:
<snip>
> END of WARNING

AS IF you guys are helping her to recover.... You guys are awful!

--
Ashikaga a27
Anonymous
September 12, 2005 5:38:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sat, 10 Sep 2005 22:41:10 -0500, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
wrote:

>On Sat, 10 Sep 2005 23:09:46 -0400, erimess wrote:
>
>>Really, right now this thing ITCHES more than it hurts!!
>
>Those are the little mites that have gotten into the wound. Soon they
>will make it to your brain...but fire will burn them out.

That's OK -- I have this fire skull spell hiding somewhere ... just
had it out about an hour ago and not sure where I layed it down.
Although that might be overdoing it a bit since it was meant for giant
spiders, green trogs and such things.


--

Erimess Dragon
-==(UDIC)==-

d++e+NT++Om UK!1!2!3!A!L!
U+uCuFuG+++uLB+uA+ nC+nH+nP+nS++nT-xa4

This is the comfort of everyone: That tho' they
may be said to die, yet their love and devotion
are, in best sense, ever present because immortal.
~William Penn
In memory of my father, 1 Jan 05
Anonymous
September 12, 2005 5:45:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 01:38:14 -0400, erimess wrote:

>On Sat, 10 Sep 2005 22:41:10 -0500, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
>wrote:
>
>>On Sat, 10 Sep 2005 23:09:46 -0400, erimess wrote:
>>
>>>Really, right now this thing ITCHES more than it hurts!!
>>
>>Those are the little mites that have gotten into the wound. Soon they
>>will make it to your brain...but fire will burn them out.
>
>That's OK -- I have this fire skull spell hiding somewhere ... just
>had it out about an hour ago and not sure where I layed it down.
>Although that might be overdoing it a bit since it was meant for giant
>spiders, green trogs and such things.

That should do nicely. Better to have some overkill anyhow, I always say.
--
The Polychromic Dragon of the -=={UDIC}==-
http://home.comcast.net/~macecil/
http://home.comcast.net/~safehex/
RGCUD Photo Gallery: http://home.comcast.net/~rgcud/
Anonymous
September 12, 2005 5:48:27 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 07:53:09 GMT, pibbur
<oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:


>
>And to Erimess: Itching is perfectly normal, despite Poly's vivid
>suggestions.

Yes, dear, I'm perfectly aware of that. :-) I fully expected it, and
I also expect it's going to get worse before it gets better. At least
the original guaze thing they taped on is gone cause I can scratch
where the tape was now. However, I have this, er, I don't remember
what they called it but it's basically like a big flexible fabric sort
of tape stuff they put over the incision. He was supposed to do all
internal stitches, but for some reason there's one outside stitch he
did (he said something to my brother about that, during one of my "out
of it" stages), and it's outside the tape. So that stitch itches. I
can kind of scratch on the outside edges of it and that helps. And
then the tape thing itches and I can only scratch around the edge.
But the incision itself is itching and that's the worst part.

I figured out the incision is over 4 inches long. The tape is about 4
inches, I can just barely see the one side and the incision is right
up to the edge of that tape thing, and on the other side that last
stitch is about a half inch beyond the tape. He originally said it
would be about 3 inches, but I also know he told me brother he found
several pieces of cyst instead of one long one like we thought. I'll
find out more what happened when I go in for my follow-up visit.



--

Erimess Dragon
-==(UDIC)==-

d++e+NT++Om UK!1!2!3!A!L!
U+uCuFuG+++uLB+uA+ nC+nH+nP+nS++nT-xa4

This is the comfort of everyone: That tho' they
may be said to die, yet their love and devotion
are, in best sense, ever present because immortal.
~William Penn
In memory of my father, 1 Jan 05
Anonymous
September 12, 2005 6:06:48 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 17:54:08 GMT, pibbur
<oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:

>
>This thread is surely developing into something. Be warned that I'm
>practically immune to yecchi things! (unless you're asked to eat them, but
>that's an entriely story).

I'm not really so much immune to yucky things as it is that I've never
really much cared to begin with.

I think medical people love working with me cause I don't cause any
problems and just quietly take whatever they wanna do to me. One
nurse asked if I had a high pain threashold. Somewhat. I also have a
very pretty bruise on my right hand from the fluid IV. I caught the
line on my gown once and pulled the needle a cockeyed direction, and
blood started backing up into the line. I had to go down the hall to
find a nurse. Two of them were freaking and I was calmer than they
were. Apparently it was supposed to be taped down onto my fingers so
I couldn't catch it on anything. The nurse who did it was named
Katrina, and except for a slight smile when she introduced herself, I
resisted the temptation for comment for a full hour. But when one
nurse asked who had taped that IV and she said she did it, I finally
said, "See, you are a disaster." I just couldn't hold it in any
longer. :-)

At any rate, I don't mind yucky stuff, except... I really have no idea
what you were even talking about, other than that women are apparently
hysterical.

I have been a good girl today. Not only did I sleep for about 13-14
hours last night, but took another nap today and have done very little
except talk to my brother on the phone and play a game for about an
hour.


--

Erimess Dragon
-==(UDIC)==-

d++e+NT++Om UK!1!2!3!A!L!
U+uCuFuG+++uLB+uA+ nC+nH+nP+nS++nT-xa4

This is the comfort of everyone: That tho' they
may be said to die, yet their love and devotion
are, in best sense, ever present because immortal.
~William Penn
In memory of my father, 1 Jan 05
Anonymous
September 12, 2005 6:10:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 05:06:27 -0500, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
wrote:

>
>By the way, have you had any strange cravings since you got home? That is
>the first sign they have reached your brain!!!

Yes, I have had a craving for some fried Poly. But, I've already had
a bit of nausea off and on, so I think I'll avoid it.



--

Erimess Dragon
-==(UDIC)==-

d++e+NT++Om UK!1!2!3!A!L!
U+uCuFuG+++uLB+uA+ nC+nH+nP+nS++nT-xa4

This is the comfort of everyone: That tho' they
may be said to die, yet their love and devotion
are, in best sense, ever present because immortal.
~William Penn
In memory of my father, 1 Jan 05
Anonymous
September 12, 2005 6:36:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 22:35:01 +0200, Ashikaga <citizenashi@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Eek! pibbur wrote:
>> Polychromic wrote:
> <snip>
>>> By the way, have you had any strange cravings since you got home? That
>>> is the first sign they have reached your brain!!!
>>
>> Stange cravings in women are in my experience (restricted to 2
>> occasions)
>> a sign of something growing in their womb. not in their brain. It's
>> called
>> children.
>>
>> WARNING: Things you don't need and possibly don't want to know coming:
> <snip>
>> END of WARNING
>
> AS IF you guys are helping her to recover.... You guys are awful!
>

Thanks for the compliment.

--
pibbur
Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Anonymous
September 12, 2005 6:44:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

Eek! pibbur wrote:
> Ashikaga wrote:
<snip>
>> AS IF you guys are helping her to recover.... You guys are awful!
>
> Thanks for the compliment.

You're welcome, I suppose....

--
Ashikaga a27
Anonymous
September 12, 2005 6:44:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 02:44:18 GMT, Ashikaga <citizenashi@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Eek! pibbur wrote:
>> Ashikaga wrote:
><snip>
>>> AS IF you guys are helping her to recover.... You guys are awful!
>>
>> Thanks for the compliment.
>
>You're welcome, I suppose....

Shoot, I thought you were offering condiments. I'm still hungry.
--
The Polychromic Dragon of the -=={UDIC}==-
http://home.comcast.net/~macecil/
http://home.comcast.net/~safehex/
RGCUD Photo Gallery: http://home.comcast.net/~rgcud/
Anonymous
September 12, 2005 1:46:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 07:48:27 +0200, <erimess> wrote:

> On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 07:53:09 GMT, pibbur
> <oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:
>
>
>>
>> And to Erimess: Itching is perfectly normal, despite Poly's vivid
>> suggestions.
>
> Yes, dear, I'm perfectly aware of that. :-) I fully expected it, and
> I also expect it's going to get worse before it gets better. At least
> the original guaze thing they taped on is gone cause I can scratch
> where the tape was now. However, I have this, er, I don't remember
> what they called it but it's basically like a big flexible fabric sort
> of tape stuff they put over the incision. He was supposed to do all
> internal stitches, but for some reason there's one outside stitch he
> did (he said something to my brother about that, during one of my "out
> of it" stages), and it's outside the tape. So that stitch itches. I
> can kind of scratch on the outside edges of it and that helps. And
> then the tape thing itches and I can only scratch around the edge.
> But the incision itself is itching and that's the worst part.
>

From my days as a doctor I used to do internal stiching of the skin like
this:

#\ /\ /\ /\ /# external knot
-------------------- wound
\/ \/ \/ \/

The /'s and the \'s does not penetrate the skin.

So there were one not in each end. I presume one could also go there and
back again, in which case you have only one external knot. But this was
long, long ago, although in the same galaxy, and I was just a general
practitioner. They probably don't do it like this now.

BTW, the first surgeons where actually barbers. Surgery wan't considered
good enough for the doctors. Only when they were able to do anything
reasonable, the men-in-white-coats took over.

Imagine, in those days you could go into a barbershop and say "one
haircut, please. And I've got this mole I want removed. But please, no
singing."
--
dr pibbur, who refuses to go to a barbershop

Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Anonymous
September 12, 2005 1:46:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 09:46:12 GMT, pibbur
<oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:

> From my days as a doctor I used to do internal stiching of the skin like
>this:
>
> #\ /\ /\ /\ /# external knot
> -------------------- wound
> \/ \/ \/ \/
>
>The /'s and the \'s does not penetrate the skin.
>
>So there were one not in each end. I presume one could also go there and
>back again, in which case you have only one external knot. But this was
>long, long ago, although in the same galaxy, and I was just a general
>practitioner. They probably don't do it like this now.

They just use staples whenever they can now. Those are gross. Stitching
is kind of gross but not so bad as being stapled.

You know, they use maggots now to clean bad wounds like burns, etc. And
they use leeches to help the blood flow for reattached small parts like
ears, fingers, etc. Everything old is new again. Maybe barbers will
start removing moles again.
--
The Polychromic Dragon of the -=={UDIC}==-
http://home.comcast.net/~macecil/
http://home.comcast.net/~safehex/
RGCUD Photo Gallery: http://home.comcast.net/~rgcud/
Anonymous
September 12, 2005 3:35:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 02:10:39 -0400, erimess wrote:

>On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 05:06:27 -0500, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
>wrote:
>
>>
>>By the way, have you had any strange cravings since you got home? That is
>>the first sign they have reached your brain!!!
>
>Yes, I have had a craving for some fried Poly. But, I've already had
>a bit of nausea off and on, so I think I'll avoid it.
Well, that's the same result you'd have had if you had gotten some
fried Poly. :-)
--
Optician Dragon
-=UDIC=-
"There is no cause so right that one cannot find a fool following it."
Larry Niven
Anonymous
September 12, 2005 3:35:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 11:35:48 GMT, Optician Dragon
<dragonlensman1@verizon.net> wrote:

>On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 02:10:39 -0400, erimess wrote:
>
>>On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 05:06:27 -0500, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
>>wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>By the way, have you had any strange cravings since you got home? That is
>>>the first sign they have reached your brain!!!
>>
>>Yes, I have had a craving for some fried Poly. But, I've already had
>>a bit of nausea off and on, so I think I'll avoid it.
>Well, that's the same result you'd have had if you had gotten some
>fried Poly. :-)

Oh come on! A bit of nausea is not the same as violent projectile
vomiting lasting 48 hours or until you're mummified whichever comes first,
now is it?
--
The Polychromic Dragon of the -=={UDIC}==-
http://home.comcast.net/~macecil/
http://home.comcast.net/~safehex/
RGCUD Photo Gallery: http://home.comcast.net/~rgcud/
Anonymous
September 12, 2005 3:51:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 12:44:06 +0200, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
wrote:

> On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 09:46:12 GMT, pibbur
> <oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:
>
>> From my days as a doctor I used to do internal stiching of the skin like
>> this:
>>
>> #\ /\ /\ /\ /# external knot
>> -------------------- wound
>> \/ \/ \/ \/
>>
>> The /'s and the \'s does not penetrate the skin.
>>
>> So there were one not in each end. I presume one could also go there and
>> back again, in which case you have only one external knot. But this was
>> long, long ago, although in the same galaxy, and I was just a general
>> practitioner. They probably don't do it like this now.
>
> They just use staples whenever they can now. Those are gross. Stitching
> is kind of gross but not so bad as being stapled.
>
> You know, they use maggots now to clean bad wounds like burns, etc. And
> they use leeches to help the blood flow for reattached small parts like
> ears, fingers, etc. Everything old is new again. Maybe barbers will
> start removing moles again.

They might, if you ordered a shave.

--
pibbur
Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Anonymous
September 12, 2005 5:16:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 08:06:48 +0200, <erimess> wrote:

> On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 17:54:08 GMT, pibbur
> <oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:
>
>>
>> This thread is surely developing into something. Be warned that I'm
>> practically immune to yecchi things! (unless you're asked to eat them,
>> but
>> that's an entriely story).
>
> I'm not really so much immune to yucky things as it is that I've never
> really much cared to begin with.
>
> I think medical people love working with me cause I don't cause any
> problems and just quietly take whatever they wanna do to me. One
> nurse asked if I had a high pain threashold. Somewhat. I also have a
> very pretty bruise on my right hand from the fluid IV. I caught the
> line on my gown once and pulled the needle a cockeyed direction, and
> blood started backing up into the line. I had to go down the hall to
> find a nurse. Two of them were freaking and I was calmer than they
> were. Apparently it was supposed to be taped down onto my fingers so
> I couldn't catch it on anything. The nurse who did it was named
> Katrina, and except for a slight smile when she introduced herself, I
> resisted the temptation for comment for a full hour. But when one
> nurse asked who had taped that IV and she said she did it, I finally
> said, "See, you are a disaster." I just couldn't hold it in any
> longer. :-)
>

Heh, that's a good one.

> At any rate, I don't mind yucky stuff, except... I really have no idea
> what you were even talking about, other than that women are apparently
> hysterical.

It's just Optician and me showing how much latin and medicine we know. The
guy behind the theory of hysteria was Hippocrates (460BC-377BC). The
theory isn't exactly state of the art any longer.

>
> I have been a good girl today. Not only did I sleep for about 13-14
> hours last night, but took another nap today and have done very little
> except talk to my brother on the phone and play a game for about an
> hour.
>

Play games. Doctor's orders. :-)

--
pibbur - must...remember.....to......include..dragon....

Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Anonymous
September 12, 2005 5:25:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 14:52:30 +0200, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
wrote:

> On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 11:35:48 GMT, Optician Dragon
> <dragonlensman1@verizon.net> wrote:
>
>> On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 02:10:39 -0400, erimess wrote:
>>
>>> On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 05:06:27 -0500, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>>>> By the way, have you had any strange cravings since you got home?
>>>> That is
>>>> the first sign they have reached your brain!!!
>>>
>>> Yes, I have had a craving for some fried Poly. But, I've already had
>>> a bit of nausea off and on, so I think I'll avoid it.
>> Well, that's the same result you'd have had if you had gotten some
>> fried Poly. :-)
>
> Oh come on! A bit of nausea is not the same as violent projectile
> vomiting lasting 48 hours or until you're mummified whichever comes
> first,
> now is it?
That depends on your perspective. Assuming that dragons are very
long-lived, and probably, when on a devouring spree, tend to ingest large
pieces of non-animal environment, a 48-hour period of vomit now and then
seems pretty mild.

--
pibbur

Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Anonymous
September 13, 2005 2:00:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 07:52:30 -0500, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
wrote:

>On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 11:35:48 GMT, Optician Dragon
><dragonlensman1@verizon.net> wrote:
>
>>On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 02:10:39 -0400, erimess wrote:
>>
>>>On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 05:06:27 -0500, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
>>>wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>>>>By the way, have you had any strange cravings since you got home? That is
>>>>the first sign they have reached your brain!!!
>>>
>>>Yes, I have had a craving for some fried Poly. But, I've already had
>>>a bit of nausea off and on, so I think I'll avoid it.
>>Well, that's the same result you'd have had if you had gotten some
>>fried Poly. :-)
>
>Oh come on! A bit of nausea is not the same as violent projectile
>vomiting lasting 48 hours or until you're mummified whichever comes first,
>now is it?
Nothing like the ol' high-speed heaves to lighten your load.
But it depends on your point of view. Now if you're on the _outside_
of a big plexiglas box and someone is blowing chunks _inside_ the
box, then you are perfectly justified to be amused, but from the
inside of the box - not so nice.

Boy aren't we into yechhy stuff now?
Hey, Pibbur - haggis!!


--
Optician Dragon
-=UDIC=-
"There is no cause so right that one cannot find a fool following it."
Larry Niven
Anonymous
September 13, 2005 2:00:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 22:00:01 GMT, Optician Dragon
<dragonlensman1@verizon.net> wrote:

>Boy aren't we into yechhy stuff now?
>Hey, Pibbur - haggis!!

Speaking of innards, I just found out that a friend of my mother is having
surgery on her aorta. She and her brother were recently diagnosed with
having Marfan's Syndrome. They discovered it after he nearly died last
year with a dissecting aorta. Now she's having the same thing but it's so
bad they're reluctantly going to do surgery. Her blood flow to one of the
kidney's and some other organs is being affected so they have little
choice. She's given a 50/50 chance to survive the surgery, but of course
the long term prospects are very bleak at best.
--
The Polychromic Dragon of the -=={UDIC}==-
http://home.comcast.net/~macecil/
http://home.comcast.net/~safehex/
RGCUD Photo Gallery: http://home.comcast.net/~rgcud/
Anonymous
September 13, 2005 2:01:12 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 13:16:26 GMT, pibbur
<oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:
>> nurse asked who had taped that IV and she said she did it, I finally
>> said, "See, you are a disaster." I just couldn't hold it in any
>> longer. :-)
>>
>
>Heh, that's a good one.
>
>> At any rate, I don't mind yucky stuff, except... I really have no idea
>> what you were even talking about, other than that women are apparently
>> hysterical.
>
>It's just Optician and me showing how much latin and medicine we know. The
>guy behind the theory of hysteria was Hippocrates (460BC-377BC). The
>theory isn't exactly state of the art any longer.
>


yes, as I understand it, he came upon this theory when his wife
reached menopause. :-)

>> I have been a good girl today. Not only did I sleep for about 13-14
>> hours last night, but took another nap today and have done very little
>> except talk to my brother on the phone and play a game for about an
>> hour.
>>
>
>Play games. Doctor's orders. :-)

--
Optician Dragon
-=UDIC=-
"There is no cause so right that one cannot find a fool following it."
Larry Niven
Anonymous
September 13, 2005 2:02:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 13:25:45 GMT, pibbur
<oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:

>On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 14:52:30 +0200, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
>wrote:
>
>> On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 11:35:48 GMT, Optician Dragon
>> <dragonlensman1@verizon.net> wrote:
>>
>>> On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 02:10:39 -0400, erimess wrote:
>>>
>>>> On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 05:06:27 -0500, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> By the way, have you had any strange cravings since you got home?
>>>>> That is
>>>>> the first sign they have reached your brain!!!
>>>>
>>>> Yes, I have had a craving for some fried Poly. But, I've already had
>>>> a bit of nausea off and on, so I think I'll avoid it.
>>> Well, that's the same result you'd have had if you had gotten some
>>> fried Poly. :-)
>>
>> Oh come on! A bit of nausea is not the same as violent projectile
>> vomiting lasting 48 hours or until you're mummified whichever comes
>> first,
>> now is it?
>That depends on your perspective. Assuming that dragons are very
>long-lived, and probably, when on a devouring spree, tend to ingest large
>pieces of non-animal environment, a 48-hour period of vomit now and then
>seems pretty mild.
Yeah, how else can you regurge those pesky daggers,dirks, and gauches?
--
Optician Dragon
-=UDIC=-
"There is no cause so right that one cannot find a fool following it."
Larry Niven
Anonymous
September 13, 2005 2:02:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 22:02:34 GMT, Optician Dragon
<dragonlensman1@verizon.net> wrote:

>On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 13:25:45 GMT, pibbur
><oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:
>
>>On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 14:52:30 +0200, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
>>wrote:
>>
>>> On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 11:35:48 GMT, Optician Dragon
>>> <dragonlensman1@verizon.net> wrote:
>>>
>>>> On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 02:10:39 -0400, erimess wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 05:06:27 -0500, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> By the way, have you had any strange cravings since you got home?
>>>>>> That is
>>>>>> the first sign they have reached your brain!!!
>>>>>
>>>>> Yes, I have had a craving for some fried Poly. But, I've already had
>>>>> a bit of nausea off and on, so I think I'll avoid it.
>>>> Well, that's the same result you'd have had if you had gotten some
>>>> fried Poly. :-)
>>>
>>> Oh come on! A bit of nausea is not the same as violent projectile
>>> vomiting lasting 48 hours or until you're mummified whichever comes
>>> first,
>>> now is it?
>>That depends on your perspective. Assuming that dragons are very
>>long-lived, and probably, when on a devouring spree, tend to ingest large
>>pieces of non-animal environment, a 48-hour period of vomit now and then
>>seems pretty mild.
>Yeah, how else can you regurge those pesky daggers,dirks, and gauches?

Regurgitate those? They are an essential part of the diet. How else do
you get iron - are you one of those pill-popping dragons?
--
The Polychromic Dragon of the -=={UDIC}==-
http://home.comcast.net/~macecil/
http://home.comcast.net/~safehex/
RGCUD Photo Gallery: http://home.comcast.net/~rgcud/
Anonymous
September 13, 2005 5:34:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Tue, 13 Sep 2005 02:04:05 +0200, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
wrote:

> On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 22:00:01 GMT, Optician Dragon
> <dragonlensman1@verizon.net> wrote:
>
>> Boy aren't we into yechhy stuff now?
>> Hey, Pibbur - haggis!!
>
> Speaking of innards, I just found out that a friend of my mother is
> having
> surgery on her aorta. She and her brother were recently diagnosed with
> having Marfan's Syndrome. They discovered it after he nearly died last
> year with a dissecting aorta. Now she's having the same thing but it's
> so
> bad they're reluctantly going to do surgery. Her blood flow to one of
> the
> kidney's and some other organs is being affected so they have little
> choice. She's given a 50/50 chance to survive the surgery, but of course
> the long term prospects are very bleak at best.

Sorry to hear that. I've only seen a patient with Marfan's once, in the
early days of my studies.

--
pibbur

Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Anonymous
September 13, 2005 5:34:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Tue, 13 Sep 2005 01:34:44 GMT, pibbur
<oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:

>On Tue, 13 Sep 2005 02:04:05 +0200, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
>wrote:
>
>> On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 22:00:01 GMT, Optician Dragon
>> <dragonlensman1@verizon.net> wrote:
>>
>>> Boy aren't we into yechhy stuff now?
>>> Hey, Pibbur - haggis!!
>>
>> Speaking of innards, I just found out that a friend of my mother is
>> having
>> surgery on her aorta. She and her brother were recently diagnosed with
>> having Marfan's Syndrome. They discovered it after he nearly died last
>> year with a dissecting aorta. Now she's having the same thing but it's
>> so
>> bad they're reluctantly going to do surgery. Her blood flow to one of
>> the
>> kidney's and some other organs is being affected so they have little
>> choice. She's given a 50/50 chance to survive the surgery, but of course
>> the long term prospects are very bleak at best.
>
>Sorry to hear that. I've only seen a patient with Marfan's once, in the
>early days of my studies.

The sad thing is that the little girl that my mother provides daycare for
might have it as well. Probably does just going by some of the physical
indicators. I guess there's not any real treatment for it at this point.
--
The Polychromic Dragon of the -=={UDIC}==-
http://home.comcast.net/~macecil/
http://home.comcast.net/~safehex/
RGCUD Photo Gallery: http://home.comcast.net/~rgcud/
Anonymous
September 13, 2005 5:54:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.computer.ultima.dragons (More info?)

On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 18:59:09 -0500, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
wrote:

>On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 22:02:34 GMT, Optician Dragon
><dragonlensman1@verizon.net> wrote:
>
>>On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 13:25:45 GMT, pibbur
>><oopsNO.CAPS000@tele2dragon.nomaill> wrote:
>>
>>>On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 14:52:30 +0200, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
>>>wrote:
>>>
>>>> On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 11:35:48 GMT, Optician Dragon
>>>> <dragonlensman1@verizon.net> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 02:10:39 -0400, erimess wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 05:06:27 -0500, Polychromic <macecil@comcast.net>
>>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> By the way, have you had any strange cravings since you got home?
>>>>>>> That is
>>>>>>> the first sign they have reached your brain!!!
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Yes, I have had a craving for some fried Poly. But, I've already had
>>>>>> a bit of nausea off and on, so I think I'll avoid it.
>>>>> Well, that's the same result you'd have had if you had gotten some
>>>>> fried Poly. :-)
>>>>
>>>> Oh come on! A bit of nausea is not the same as violent projectile
>>>> vomiting lasting 48 hours or until you're mummified whichever comes
>>>> first,
>>>> now is it?
>>>That depends on your perspective. Assuming that dragons are very
>>>long-lived, and probably, when on a devouring spree, tend to ingest large
>>>pieces of non-animal environment, a 48-hour period of vomit now and then
>>>seems pretty mild.
>>Yeah, how else can you regurge those pesky daggers,dirks, and gauches?
>
>Regurgitate those? They are an essential part of the diet. How else do
>you get iron - are you one of those pill-popping dragons?
I prefer snorting FeO2.
--
Optician Dragon
-=UDIC=-
"There is no cause so right that one cannot find a fool following it."
Larry Niven
!