Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

How to get a beginner/entry job at a local IT shop

Last response: in Work & Education
Share
February 6, 2012 3:39:13 AM

Yes, I know I keep asking this question, but most of the time someone blows me off or gives me an erroneous answer not fulfilling.

I have this desire to get a entry level IT job at a local shop. A small business none the less. There are a few tech there that are A+ certified for years...more than I have been alive let us just say. I would like to get a job in computer repair/construction: It is what they do.

Here are my questions:

1) is an A+ a bonus?
2) I may have an A+ but that does not mean I know much about computers. Will they train me if I do not know something? Or is that a waste of time? I know more than the average user, but I am not Tech specialist.
3) will they allow me to perform free training to see if they want me? Or is that up to the main techs?
February 6, 2012 1:19:15 PM

Technically an A+ certified technician is certified to work on any machine regardless of age or operating system.....(To normal techs this just means you have a strong fundamental understanding of computers). An A+ is always a bonus, its better than nothing.



Any place (Especially a local repair shop) that doesn't want to provide any on site training is not a place you want to work anyway. Every tech there was in your same position, as long as you want to learn how to be a good tech and do whats asked of you there should be no problem.


If I were you I would apply and during the interview tell them exactly what you are thinking. "This is my first job I'm inquisitive and a quick leaner." They will love that. You will also learn way faster than your peers that arent working in the field. I got my A+ then my first repair job and I can tell you that an A+ prepares you but at the same time I learned volumes from hanging out with / asking questions to the more experienced techs.
February 6, 2012 4:49:31 PM

basically, go to them, tell them I want to be a tech alongside with them, that I am getting my A+ and want to learn how to be a good tech and willing to do free training if it is not too much? Will they expect much form me for knowledge about computers/what would they like me to know?

Related resources
February 6, 2012 6:42:35 PM

When I got my first tech job (Mind you im only 23....) I told them in the interview I want to learn, I want to be a good tech and reasons why I would be one. Also I told them I will only ask a question once. For some reason employers love that answer.

They'll probably ask you about your experience. What tasks are you comfortable performing (Hardware installations - GPU, MOBO, HDD, whatever, Software installs, OS installs, maintenance, cleaning, virus removals).

Seriously think about what tasks you can do, which ones you are good at, which tasks you like to do. Write down what you know how to do and i bet you will be surprised how long of a list it becomes.

You have to remember you are also a kid (I think) they are going to be like "Unless you can perform a server migration blindfolded with a gun to your head, you cannot work here!" no one says that and if they do you don't want to work there.
February 6, 2012 7:03:13 PM

wanamingo said:
When I got my first tech job (Mind you im only 23....) I told them in the interview I want to learn, I want to be a good tech and reasons why I would be one. Also I told them I will only ask a question once. For some reason employers love that answer.

They'll probably ask you about your experience. What tasks are you comfortable performing (Hardware installations - GPU, MOBO, HDD, whatever, Software installs, OS installs, maintenance, cleaning, virus removals).

Seriously think about what tasks you can do, which ones you are good at, which tasks you like to do. Write down what you know how to do and i bet you will be surprised how long of a list it becomes.

You have to remember you are also a kid (I think) they are going to be like "Unless you can perform a server migration blindfolded with a gun to your head, you cannot work here!" no one says that and if they do you don't want to work there.


When you said only ask one question...do you mean throughout the day, hour, year, life?

Also, my list might not seem impressive, however, can I still respond as to saying the necessary skills of a tech?

One last thing... How will I be able to truly convince them? If they say get a degree...should I just walk?



To me...it sounds easy yet hard. I know how to assemble a computer, install an OS on a new drive, connect devices, update, software management is a little sad though so is CMD & DOS, clean computers, but not so much virus remover...that has been told to me is difficult to understand.

I do want this job, let there be baby steps though...
February 7, 2012 11:42:57 AM

Not one question just ask the question once. Nothing is more annoying than being asked the same question multiple times. Asking someone "How do I do this?" more than once doesn't make you look good.

If they say get a degree walk, you want a job and experience they want experience.

Just make your resume sound good and give a good interview and you'll be fine.

Also you are over thinking this, just apply.
February 7, 2012 1:38:15 PM

If I do get a job there, should I purchase a yellow pad for when they instruct me on certain procedures like virus removal?
February 7, 2012 1:52:37 PM

If thats what works for you do it. I would just make tons of mental notes and look up any questions i had. Just start accumulating knowledge. little bits.

For example: Ask (Or write down) Whats the difference between a quick install and a regular install? ask or check it out when its more convenient. Now you know that. After several weeks of collecting little bits of info you will have quite a repertoire.

I live and die by the pad of paper, i find im much more aware if i have it written down.

Just be inquisitive. Also if you haven't worked in "The Field" the A+ is a good groundwork but you will learn 10X faster actually doing it.
February 7, 2012 4:51:36 PM

Yellow pad...check!

Thanks. Keep you updated.
February 8, 2012 11:39:46 PM

Should I inquire that I want to be an apprentice/be part of an internship? How many hours of training will there be?

I understand learning never ends, but how much should I know before I get hired, while I am hires, then after I leave/fired/find another workplace.
February 22, 2012 11:42:28 PM

A+ certificaton is always a plus. You may not know everything but you will know a lot more than people with colledge degrees normally do as they don't do hands on, just books.

But the thing is, a good PC tech company will have their own test made up of things they commonly see. We just did a new set of tests and I came up with questions I thought were important and as well consumers ask me.

The majority of customers wont know much about PCs. Even the ones that think they do, wont know nearly as much as they think they do.

As an example, a guy had us test his PSU. When it tested good, he brought in the rest of the system he was building. For starters, he had the PSU upside down in a bottom mount case so it was pulling air from the second GPU he had. Second, he had a PCIe 8pin plugged into the mobos 8pin EPS and was why it wouldn't power on, let alone post. Third he had molex to PCIe for one of his GPUs, but he has a Cooler Master 1000W Modular PSU so he should use the dedicated PCIe lanes instead as they provide more stable power.

Most companies will have their own software and way of doing things, my boss micro manages but then again his entire life is in the store so I don't care. But he and I have gotten to a certain way of doing things and when we hired a new tech on (guy from Geek Squad, but actually know his stuff) we trained him on how we wanted things. Now hes great and we do pretty well. So the company you find will more than likley train you.

As for the free training, if they are interested in hiring you they would normally hire you and train you while paying. Normally a 1-2week period. Of course I am only guessing as it depends on the company.

To be a good tech though, you really need to be on top of past, present and future technologies and as well just have an eye for things. Sometimes a system will pass every diag and still not work, thats when it takes a good eye and knowledge. Also being able to look up something you don't know is a plus.

Good luck with your endevor.
February 23, 2012 1:21:00 AM

Thank You for your response. I appreciate it! :) 

With the A+, I have more than a 4 year does? BTW, here is the book I am reading:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0 [...] R81TND7QXP

Basically, it is a hands-on book, with testing material on stand-by.
!