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Router or Hub?

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Anonymous
June 17, 2005 12:23:50 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Is there a capability difference between DSL routers and hubs?


--
Don
Vancouver, USA

More about : router hub

Anonymous
June 17, 2005 2:45:24 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

yes, a router is "smart" while a hub is "dumb."

A router has an IP address.


--
The people think the Constitution protects their rights;
But government sees it as an obstacle to be overcome.
some support
http://www.usdoj.gov/olc/secondamendment2.htm



"Don Schmidt" <RetiredEngineer@pnb.telco> wrote in message
news:11b5qo5ga48mjd0@corp.supernews.com...
| Is there a capability difference between DSL routers and
hubs?
|
|
| --
| Don
| Vancouver, USA
|
|
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 3:53:33 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

To Expand on Jim's response a bit. A router accepts an IP address from your
ISP, and creates a network beneath it. Networked objects attached to your
router get an IP address from the router and go through it to get on the
network. Many routers have a simple firewall that enhances your security.
While a hub simply creates more ports to connect to. All networked objects
to the HUB are essentially on the ISP's network.
"Don Schmidt" <RetiredEngineer@pnb.telco> wrote in message
news:11b5qo5ga48mjd0@corp.supernews.com...
> Is there a capability difference between DSL routers and hubs?
>
>
> --
> Don
> Vancouver, USA
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 3:53:34 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Thanks Jim & Jay.

My Qwest DSL provider suggested I use a hub (got a Linksys 5 port) for my
Actiontec GT701. It seems to be working without any problems on a home
network, two tower computers, a printer and soon to add a wireless laptop.

--
Don
Vancouver, USA



"Jay Hulslander" <jdh34@cornell.edu> wrote in message
news:D 8urm3$k0g$1@ruby.cit.cornell.edu...
> To Expand on Jim's response a bit. A router accepts an IP address from
> your
> ISP, and creates a network beneath it. Networked objects attached to your
> router get an IP address from the router and go through it to get on the
> network. Many routers have a simple firewall that enhances your security.
> While a hub simply creates more ports to connect to. All networked
> objects
> to the HUB are essentially on the ISP's network.
> "Don Schmidt" <RetiredEngineer@pnb.telco> wrote in message
> news:11b5qo5ga48mjd0@corp.supernews.com...
>> Is there a capability difference between DSL routers and hubs?
>>
>>
>> --
>> Don
>> Vancouver, USA
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 6:24:31 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

The hub will work fine, but it provides no security for the
computers in your network. A router will allow each
computer to run at its best speed. A router will handle a
larger number of nodes without slowing the LAN since traffic
is more isolated and controlled. A hubs primary advantage
is cost, but good routers are now less than $50, still more
than a hub, but not extremely so.

One reason the ISP (DSL or cable might prefer you use a hub
is that they can monitor how many computers you have
connected to their network and raise your rates if you
connect more computers. With a router all they see is the
router.


--
The people think the Constitution protects their rights;
But government sees it as an obstacle to be overcome.
some support
http://www.usdoj.gov/olc/secondamendment2.htm



"Don Schmidt" <RetiredEngineer@pnb.telco> wrote in message
news:11b66qhl1t9v05b@corp.supernews.com...
| Thanks Jim & Jay.
|
| My Qwest DSL provider suggested I use a hub (got a Linksys
5 port) for my
| Actiontec GT701. It seems to be working without any
problems on a home
| network, two tower computers, a printer and soon to add a
wireless laptop.
|
| --
| Don
| Vancouver, USA
|
|
|
| "Jay Hulslander" <jdh34@cornell.edu> wrote in message
| news:D 8urm3$k0g$1@ruby.cit.cornell.edu...
| > To Expand on Jim's response a bit. A router accepts an
IP address from
| > your
| > ISP, and creates a network beneath it. Networked
objects attached to your
| > router get an IP address from the router and go through
it to get on the
| > network. Many routers have a simple firewall that
enhances your security.
| > While a hub simply creates more ports to connect to.
All networked
| > objects
| > to the HUB are essentially on the ISP's network.
| > "Don Schmidt" <RetiredEngineer@pnb.telco> wrote in
message
| > news:11b5qo5ga48mjd0@corp.supernews.com...
| >> Is there a capability difference between DSL routers
and hubs?
| >>
| >>
| >> --
| >> Don
| >> Vancouver, USA
| >>
| >>
| >
| >
|
|
June 17, 2005 8:26:27 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Some DSL modems, including the Actiontec GT701, have a built in NAT router
which enables you to share your DSL connection without having to buy an
external router. It gives you the same security benefits and basic
functionality as a typical home router.
--

"Don Schmidt" <RetiredEngineer@pnb.telco> wrote in message
news:11b5qo5ga48mjd0@corp.supernews.com...
> Is there a capability difference between DSL routers and hubs?
>
>
> --
> Don
> Vancouver, USA
>
June 17, 2005 8:50:48 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Jim,

A hub will rarely work fine (or at all) for Internet sharing with a DSL or
Cable modem unless that modem has a built in router. For the standard home
use deal, broadband providers provide one and only one external IP address
(usually by DHCP). If a hub is connected to a non-routing broadband modem a
variety of problems tend to occur.

Most DSL modems these days include a built in router, and most DSL providers
permit connection sharing at no additional cost. Cable modems generally do
not contain built in routers, and many of the large cable companies don't
allow connection sharing, though of course it's widely done by adding an
unreported router.

Router equipped DSL modems can be generally be configured to "bridge mode"
for use with an external router. That may be if a user needs a router with
more advanced and configurable features, but otherwise has no advantage for
a typical home user.

GTS
--

"Jim Macklin" <p51mustang[threeX12]@xxxhotmail.calm> wrote in message
news:o p7JoJ3cFHA.3712@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> The hub will work fine, but it provides no security for the
> computers in your network. A router will allow each
> computer to run at its best speed. A router will handle a
> larger number of nodes without slowing the LAN since traffic
> is more isolated and controlled. A hubs primary advantage
> is cost, but good routers are now less than $50, still more
> than a hub, but not extremely so.
>
> One reason the ISP (DSL or cable might prefer you use a hub
> is that they can monitor how many computers you have
> connected to their network and raise your rates if you
> connect more computers. With a router all they see is the
> router.
>
>
> --
> The people think the Constitution protects their rights;
> But government sees it as an obstacle to be overcome.
> some support
> http://www.usdoj.gov/olc/secondamendment2.htm
>
>
>
> "Don Schmidt" <RetiredEngineer@pnb.telco> wrote in message
> news:11b66qhl1t9v05b@corp.supernews.com...
> | Thanks Jim & Jay.
> |
> | My Qwest DSL provider suggested I use a hub (got a Linksys
> 5 port) for my
> | Actiontec GT701. It seems to be working without any
> problems on a home
> | network, two tower computers, a printer and soon to add a
> wireless laptop.
> |
> | --
> | Don
> | Vancouver, USA
> |
> |
> |
> | "Jay Hulslander" <jdh34@cornell.edu> wrote in message
> | news:D 8urm3$k0g$1@ruby.cit.cornell.edu...
> | > To Expand on Jim's response a bit. A router accepts an
> IP address from
> | > your
> | > ISP, and creates a network beneath it. Networked
> objects attached to your
> | > router get an IP address from the router and go through
> it to get on the
> | > network. Many routers have a simple firewall that
> enhances your security.
> | > While a hub simply creates more ports to connect to.
> All networked
> | > objects
> | > to the HUB are essentially on the ISP's network.
> | > "Don Schmidt" <RetiredEngineer@pnb.telco> wrote in
> message
> | > news:11b5qo5ga48mjd0@corp.supernews.com...
> | >> Is there a capability difference between DSL routers
> and hubs?
> | >>
> | >>
> | >> --
> | >> Don
> | >> Vancouver, USA
> | >>
> | >>
> | >
> | >
> |
> |
>
>
Anonymous
June 18, 2005 1:15:01 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Actually, very few broadband routers have any type of firewall built
in to them. They are pretty rare. Most DO have NAT built in, but
that is a far cry from a firewall.

On Fri, 17 Jun 2005 11:53:33 -0400, "Jay Hulslander"
<jdh34@cornell.edu> wrote:

>To Expand on Jim's response a bit. A router accepts an IP address from your
>ISP, and creates a network beneath it. Networked objects attached to your
>router get an IP address from the router and go through it to get on the
>network. Many routers have a simple firewall that enhances your security.
>While a hub simply creates more ports to connect to. All networked objects
>to the HUB are essentially on the ISP's network.
>"Don Schmidt" <RetiredEngineer@pnb.telco> wrote in message
>news:11b5qo5ga48mjd0@corp.supernews.com...
>> Is there a capability difference between DSL routers and hubs?
>>
>>
>> --
>> Don
>> Vancouver, USA
>>
>>
>
Anonymous
June 18, 2005 1:15:02 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Please explain why NAT won't work as a firewall in a router?

Thanks,
Tom
"NobodyMan" <none@none.net> wrote in message
news:tat6b1lk21nnlh5afl9a3qo9voh2t8dv91@4ax.com...
| Actually, very few broadband routers have any type of firewall built
| in to them. They are pretty rare. Most DO have NAT built in, but
| that is a far cry from a firewall.
|
Anonymous
June 18, 2005 6:35:53 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

In article <eksdxW6cFHA.2696@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl>,
tompepper@mvps.invalid says...
> Please explain why NAT won't work as a firewall in a router?

Take the time to look-up how NAT works, it's a routing method, not a
firewall inspection method.

NAT Routers don't even always include SPI.

NAT routers don't have rule sets or the ability to determine if port 80
traffic is HTTP or something else - all of my firewalls do.

NAT routers, Linksys, D-Link, Netgear, etc.... Are all just glorified
NAT boxes, some have firewall like features, but that doesn't make them
a firewall.

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