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ADS DVD Xpress DX2: Legal, but imperfect, DVD Copying

Last response: in Tom's Guide
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July 25, 2006 6:06:28 PM

ADS Tech says its DVD Xpress DX2 is an \"ideal\" solution for making legal copies of your store-bought DVDs. But Mike Baggaley found that it all depends on your definition of \"ideal\" is.

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July 25, 2006 9:27:48 PM

The real problem with copy protection is that the people who impact the profits of Movie companies have never had problem doing what they do. Infact, every form of copy protection has been cracked in hours, even the usb dongles used with expencive programs like Lightwave. So, copy protection only hurts the honest buyer who gets fed up with the logistics of actualy owning the product they purchased. I wouldnt be supprised if more people stop buying DVD's because they never feel like they own the dvd in the first place. Why spend 20 bucks on something thats not yours and you cant protect?


Just get Netflix and rent stuff when you want it.
July 25, 2006 11:05:06 PM

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...every form of copy protection has been cracked in hours, ...so, copy protection only hurts the honest buyer... Just get Netflix and rent stuff when you want it.


I agree, you really have to question the motives of the people putting together these laws. By all means help the movie companies protect their investment, but when laws like the DCMA seem to be designed to turn the honest consumers into criminals while piracy continues to thrive, relatively unhindered, what have we accomplished?

Then again, one has only to listen to Senator Ted Stevens talk about the internet to discover how ridiculously disconnected (no pun intended :roll:)  our lawmakers seem to be when it comes to technology.
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July 26, 2006 3:16:15 PM

:idea: exactly why I don't buy DVD's, haven't purchased a CD in years though I used to be a big collector, and refuse to buy DRM crippled music via iTunes, et al. The MPAA & RIAA are about as technically inept as the US lawmakers who continually support anti-consumer legislation. I have no problem purchasing media that I genuinely own and have full control over, including where I play it and how I protect it (backup). Ironic how otherwise law-abiding consumers are better served by hackers than industry and government.

Thank you for the good review on this product. Keep up the great work.
July 26, 2006 4:06:19 PM

Tim said:
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Why would anyone buy ADS DVD Xpress DX2 and reconvert to analog video when products like DVD Decrypter and SlySoft's AnyDVD are available which can make 1:1 copies of any CSS-enabled DVDs???

While development of DVD Decrypter has been shut down, it's still freely available to anyone who googles it.

AnyDVD has been available for many years now and it easily cripples Macrovision and CSS for any DVD.

I cannot believe for a second that you haven't heard of DVD Decrypter or AnyDVD?
July 26, 2006 4:08:03 PM

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I cannot believe for a second that you haven't heard of DVD Decrypter or AnyDVD?

Of course we know about these and other DVD ripping products. But since they are illegal in the U.S., we thought we'd look at something that the manufacturer pitches as a legal alternative.
July 26, 2006 4:25:21 PM

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I can't imagine why you would want a DVD capture of yourself playing a video game, but the important thing is that it's possible
I can!
July 26, 2006 4:57:34 PM

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Ironic how otherwise law-abiding consumers are better served by hackers than industry and government.


Makes you want to run for office doesn't it? If our good-old-boy legislation continues unchecked, consumer rights will eventually be reduced to nothing and piracy will only increase as people look for a way to freely use their media content. Thanks for your comments gowens.
July 26, 2006 5:06:07 PM

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I can!


:lol:  Who knew?! And here I thought recording video games died with trying to prove to your friends that you can get Mario to jump over the flag in SMB!

Thanks Bloodshedder.
July 26, 2006 6:31:13 PM

Quote:
I can't imagine why you would want a DVD capture of yourself playing a video game, but the important thing is that it's possible
I can!

He's so desperate for attention he gives it to himself.


Yes it is nice to see that the MPAA will continue to put the pirate first over the consumer. Because they're the ones who win at this. Its kind of like the arguement of gun control where if you make guns illegal, then criminals won't have them. Last I checked criminals don't obey the law and will have them anyway.

A few months back when Star Wars: Empire at War came out, I was one of the many who went out and bought the game. The first copy I got, I couldn't install because the CD Key had been misprinted on the manual and the last several digits were missing. No harm. I took it back and got a new copy. Bring my new copy home, install it, and try to play it. Instead I get a wonderful message basically informing me that I was trying to steal the game and could not play it. Many other people had the same or similiar issues. All thanks to shitty copy protection. Did it affect the pirate? No. One even gloated on the games forums how he was already playing the game and didn't even pay for it. Lucky one of the many other thousands figured out my particular problem and I was able to play the game. But not after sending a nasty email to Lucasarts thanking them for being so happy to get my money while at the same time almost screwing me over for it.
July 26, 2006 9:45:18 PM

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the MPAA will continue to put the pirate first over the consumer


No doubt. Shouldn't companies be offering incentives to entice me to purchase their goods rather than punishing me immediately for being honest and buying their product? I really don't have any trouble with the developers making an attempt to secure their investment, but I often feel like I'm on the outside looking in as I see people who are freely using stolen content without concern for DRM restrictions; and I, having shelled out a fistful of dough to keep my conscience clear, find myself blocked at every turn. Lawmakers are barking up the wrong tree. Piracy is already illegal. Do we need more piracy laws or would it be more productive to concentrate our efforts on finding the pirates and enforcing the laws that we already have?

Thanks for posting FITCamaro.
July 27, 2006 1:45:18 AM

Quote:
I can't imagine why you would want a DVD capture of yourself playing a video game, but the important thing is that it's possible
I can!

He's so desperate for attention he gives it to himself.
What?
July 27, 2006 4:11:03 AM

Man, do I hate running across articles like this. On one hand I agree with the assumption of fair use rights, but on the other hand I understand when I buy a movie I am buying the right to watch the movie in the privacy of my home and not the ability to alter the work.

I can't say I've been against the studios in their wishes not to have encryption and region protection removed from their products, yet for them litigate for settlements 100s of times the price of a single movie is unreasonable.

I truly believe the reason studios are against relaxing encryption is the weak defenses for doing so. For example, this article suggests a justificaton for copying a protected movie is to avoid it becoming damaged. The defense has become so weak because it is continually being raised. Its easily countered by showing a propensity for gross negligence (i.e. how do you protect other sensitive items such as the dvd player, your tv, your wallet).

If being able to play the movie from the hard drive is going to become the new medium for playback, I am certain someone is going to create a legal consumer electronic that will do it. It seems reasonable that the OS (Microsoft) will eventually embed a ripper to be able to do so. I guess at this point they are not ready to do so.

As far as this software is concerned, I've had (have) enough uncertainty with laws. The DCMA states no circumvention of protect even if you've purchased it, so I am going follow that to its strictest interpretation.
July 27, 2006 4:03:11 PM

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I truly believe the reason studios are against relaxing encryption is the weak defenses for doing so.


However, there needs to be a way for everyone to have their rights protected. If our fair use rights allow us to protect ourselves from our own gross negligence as you put it, then another law should not have been written with the purpose of denying us those rights unless it actually justified itself by eliminating piracy. It's clear that it has not, making it an ineffective law that should be re-addressed rather than be blindly followed.

Quote:
...this article suggests a justificaton for copying a protected movie is to avoid it becoming damaged. The defense has become so weak because it is continually being raised.


The question remains- why else would an honest person want to copy a movie? It may be a tired argument, but it doesn't make it an invalid one.

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... so I am going follow that to its strictest interpretation.


I believe that there are many honest people, such as yourself, who will take this stance and in a way, it's the only purely honest thing to do. However as you said, with the immergence of the HTPC there comes a need to store films on a hard drive. Hard drive technology is a less than ideal solution in terms of permanence because it's a system with moving parts that will eventually fail. We will eventually need to develop a system that allows for a hard copy, such as a DVD for permanent storage and a hard drive for use. Which raises the same issue all over again.

The whole thing is very frustrating. :roll:

Thanks for your comments Sunangel, you raised some good points
December 18, 2006 4:04:59 PM

Wait a Minute, Please.

I do not belive the PRIMARY purpose of ADS DVD Express is copying commercial DVD movies. What I purchased it for, and what the fellow of the store suggested, was to transfer my VHS home (non-commercial) "movies" to DVD (and do a little editing through the ULEAD Studio9 software).

Mine are regular (non-S-video) VHS recordings. It's quite simple to connect the VHS player to the composite video and the l&r audio cables to the ADS "box" and then USB connector to the computer.

I had noticed some decline in quality going from VHS to DVD through the ADS DVD Xpress DX2, but, until I read the article in THG, did not know why.

So I pose to this forum the following question: If I am willing to ditch the ADS DVD Xpress and start over, is there a better way to accomplish my goal? Again, I do NOT wish to copy commercial DVDs, merely to obtain a good quality transfer from my VHS home movies to DVD (and then be able to do a little editing).

Thank you,

Howard
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