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Setting max CPU usage for an application

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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
June 25, 2005 1:56:22 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Greetings,

I'm not a network admin (I'm a [shudder] software developer) so I'm not sure
where to do what I want to do, or if it is even possible: I would like to
know if there is a way to set the maximum CPU usage of an application (in a
global sense, so that wouldn't have to worry about an app running away with
my CPU's capacity).

I have obeserved that web browsers (Firefox, Netscape and Internet Explorer)
tend to eat up a lot of CPU utilization, 60%+ (and sometimes more than 90%)
when Flash is involved.

I would like to cap how much of the CPU these web browsers can use. I'm
tired of the CPU cooling fan kicking on notebook when I am using a web
browser and viewing a website that uses Flash (or some other control).

I am using Windows XP Professional with Service Pack 2 and all the latest
patches.

Thanks for any insight.

Chris
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
June 25, 2005 2:18:30 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Chris Hayes wrote:
> I'm not a network admin (I'm a [shudder] software developer) so I'm
> not sure where to do what I want to do, or if it is even possible: I
> would like to know if there is a way to set the maximum CPU usage of
> an application (in a global sense, so that wouldn't have to worry
> about an app running away with my CPU's capacity).
>
> I have obeserved that web browsers (Firefox, Netscape and Internet
> Explorer) tend to eat up a lot of CPU utilization, 60%+ (and
> sometimes more than 90%) when Flash is involved.
>
> I would like to cap how much of the CPU these web browsers can use.
> I'm tired of the CPU cooling fan kicking on notebook when I am using
> a web browser and viewing a website that uses Flash (or some other
> control).
> I am using Windows XP Professional with Service Pack 2 and all the
> latest patches.

You can control most applications "priority level" in the task manager
(CTRL+SHIFT+ESC) under the processes tab. Right click on the name and "Set
Priority".

Notes directly from Windows Help..
-----
To change the priority of a running program
- On the Processes tab, right-click the program you want to change, point
to Set Priority, and then click the command you want.
Notes
- To view the priority of running programs, on the Processes tab, on the
View menu, click Select Columns. In the Select Columns dialog box, select
the Base Priority check box, and then click OK.
- Changing the priority of a process can make it run faster or slower
(depending on whether you raise or lower the priority), but it can also
adversely affect the performance of other processes.
------


If you have multiple processors, you can set processor affinity and point a
process to a certain processor.


You can also look here:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Operating_Systems/WinXP...
Interesting read.

Also I learned about "ThreadMaster" lately - althoughg it may do what you
want - I think it may only do it on a server OS.
http://threadmaster.tripod.com/


--
Shenan Stanley
MS-MVP
--
How To Ask Questions The Smart Way
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
June 25, 2005 2:45:08 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

I know I can set the priority in Task Manager, does this set it for every
time I use the app?

I want to set the MAX CPU usage for a and not think about it again...

I'm not a big Flash fan...

Thanks,

Chris

"Shenan Stanley" <newshelper@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:u01$WTTeFHA.1684@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Chris Hayes wrote:
>> I'm not a network admin (I'm a [shudder] software developer) so I'm
>> not sure where to do what I want to do, or if it is even possible: I
>> would like to know if there is a way to set the maximum CPU usage of
>> an application (in a global sense, so that wouldn't have to worry
>> about an app running away with my CPU's capacity).
>>
>> I have obeserved that web browsers (Firefox, Netscape and Internet
>> Explorer) tend to eat up a lot of CPU utilization, 60%+ (and
>> sometimes more than 90%) when Flash is involved.
>>
>> I would like to cap how much of the CPU these web browsers can use.
>> I'm tired of the CPU cooling fan kicking on notebook when I am using
>> a web browser and viewing a website that uses Flash (or some other
>> control).
>> I am using Windows XP Professional with Service Pack 2 and all the
>> latest patches.
>
> You can control most applications "priority level" in the task manager
> (CTRL+SHIFT+ESC) under the processes tab. Right click on the name and
> "Set
> Priority".
>
> Notes directly from Windows Help..
> -----
> To change the priority of a running program
> - On the Processes tab, right-click the program you want to change, point
> to Set Priority, and then click the command you want.
> Notes
> - To view the priority of running programs, on the Processes tab, on the
> View menu, click Select Columns. In the Select Columns dialog box, select
> the Base Priority check box, and then click OK.
> - Changing the priority of a process can make it run faster or slower
> (depending on whether you raise or lower the priority), but it can also
> adversely affect the performance of other processes.
> ------
>
>
> If you have multiple processors, you can set processor affinity and point
> a
> process to a certain processor.
>
>
> You can also look here:
> http://www.experts-exchange.com/Operating_Systems/WinXP...
> Interesting read.
>
> Also I learned about "ThreadMaster" lately - althoughg it may do what you
> want - I think it may only do it on a server OS.
> http://threadmaster.tripod.com/
>
>
> --
> Shenan Stanley
> MS-MVP
> --
> How To Ask Questions The Smart Way
> http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
>
Related resources
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
June 25, 2005 3:08:22 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

You are saying that you want to "slow down" an application that is honestly
calling for high CPU usage?

Not a good idea in my mind. If an application can not get the resources it
needs to run it may well crash.

--
Regards,

Richard Urban

aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)

If you knew as much as you thought you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!


"Chris Hayes" <cp.hayes@[NO2SPAM]sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:%23wkkcFTeFHA.132@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Greetings,
>
> I'm not a network admin (I'm a [shudder] software developer) so I'm not
> sure where to do what I want to do, or if it is even possible: I would
> like to know if there is a way to set the maximum CPU usage of an
> application (in a global sense, so that wouldn't have to worry about an
> app running away with my CPU's capacity).
>
> I have obeserved that web browsers (Firefox, Netscape and Internet
> Explorer) tend to eat up a lot of CPU utilization, 60%+ (and sometimes
> more than 90%) when Flash is involved.
>
> I would like to cap how much of the CPU these web browsers can use. I'm
> tired of the CPU cooling fan kicking on notebook when I am using a web
> browser and viewing a website that uses Flash (or some other control).
>
> I am using Windows XP Professional with Service Pack 2 and all the latest
> patches.
>
> Thanks for any insight.
>
> Chris
>
>
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
June 25, 2005 11:19:41 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

I use a pop-up utility called PopUpCop (great, by the way). With it I can
control almost all aspects of web browsing - including Flash. I can disable
Flash across the board, or leave Flash on and disable only by web site.

For a computer low on resources you can block as much eye candy as you deem
necessary!

--
Regards,

Richard Urban

aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)

If you knew as much as you thought you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!


"Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:o lYPmMTeFHA.220@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> You are saying that you want to "slow down" an application that is
> honestly calling for high CPU usage?
>
> Not a good idea in my mind. If an application can not get the resources it
> needs to run it may well crash.
>
> --
> Regards,
>
> Richard Urban
>
> aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)
>
> If you knew as much as you thought you know,
> You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!
>
>
> "Chris Hayes" <cp.hayes@[NO2SPAM]sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
> news:%23wkkcFTeFHA.132@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> Greetings,
>>
>> I'm not a network admin (I'm a [shudder] software developer) so I'm not
>> sure where to do what I want to do, or if it is even possible: I would
>> like to know if there is a way to set the maximum CPU usage of an
>> application (in a global sense, so that wouldn't have to worry about an
>> app running away with my CPU's capacity).
>>
>> I have obeserved that web browsers (Firefox, Netscape and Internet
>> Explorer) tend to eat up a lot of CPU utilization, 60%+ (and sometimes
>> more than 90%) when Flash is involved.
>>
>> I would like to cap how much of the CPU these web browsers can use. I'm
>> tired of the CPU cooling fan kicking on notebook when I am using a web
>> browser and viewing a website that uses Flash (or some other control).
>>
>> I am using Windows XP Professional with Service Pack 2 and all the latest
>> patches.
>>
>> Thanks for any insight.
>>
>> Chris
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
June 25, 2005 12:20:45 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Hi Chris,

No, it's a one-shot deal that has to be reset every time.

--
Best of Luck,

Rick Rogers, aka "Nutcase" - Microsoft MVP
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/
Associate Expert - WindowsXP Expert Zone
www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
Windows help - www.rickrogers.org

"Chris Hayes" <cp.hayes@[NO2SPAM]sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:%230RqsgTeFHA.2732@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>I know I can set the priority in Task Manager, does this set it for every
>time I use the app?
>
> I want to set the MAX CPU usage for a and not think about it again...
>
> I'm not a big Flash fan...
>
> Thanks,
>
> Chris
>
> "Shenan Stanley" <newshelper@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:u01$WTTeFHA.1684@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> Chris Hayes wrote:
>>> I'm not a network admin (I'm a [shudder] software developer) so I'm
>>> not sure where to do what I want to do, or if it is even possible: I
>>> would like to know if there is a way to set the maximum CPU usage of
>>> an application (in a global sense, so that wouldn't have to worry
>>> about an app running away with my CPU's capacity).
>>>
>>> I have obeserved that web browsers (Firefox, Netscape and Internet
>>> Explorer) tend to eat up a lot of CPU utilization, 60%+ (and
>>> sometimes more than 90%) when Flash is involved.
>>>
>>> I would like to cap how much of the CPU these web browsers can use.
>>> I'm tired of the CPU cooling fan kicking on notebook when I am using
>>> a web browser and viewing a website that uses Flash (or some other
>>> control).
>>> I am using Windows XP Professional with Service Pack 2 and all the
>>> latest patches.
>>
>> You can control most applications "priority level" in the task manager
>> (CTRL+SHIFT+ESC) under the processes tab. Right click on the name and
>> "Set
>> Priority".
>>
>> Notes directly from Windows Help..
>> -----
>> To change the priority of a running program
>> - On the Processes tab, right-click the program you want to change, point
>> to Set Priority, and then click the command you want.
>> Notes
>> - To view the priority of running programs, on the Processes tab, on the
>> View menu, click Select Columns. In the Select Columns dialog box, select
>> the Base Priority check box, and then click OK.
>> - Changing the priority of a process can make it run faster or slower
>> (depending on whether you raise or lower the priority), but it can also
>> adversely affect the performance of other processes.
>> ------
>>
>>
>> If you have multiple processors, you can set processor affinity and point
>> a
>> process to a certain processor.
>>
>>
>> You can also look here:
>> http://www.experts-exchange.com/Operating_Systems/WinXP...
>> Interesting read.
>>
>> Also I learned about "ThreadMaster" lately - althoughg it may do what you
>> want - I think it may only do it on a server OS.
>> http://threadmaster.tripod.com/
>>
>>
>> --
>> Shenan Stanley
>> MS-MVP
>> --
>> How To Ask Questions The Smart Way
>> http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
>>
>
>
!