Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Poor Video Animations!

Last response: in Windows XP
Share
June 23, 2002 6:19:45 PM

I installed WinXP on a computer with specifications listed below;
Processor: CyrixInstead 333 MHz
System Board: TX Pro
Ram: 192 MB
WinXP exhibited great performance on this system except video animations.
It plays videos so poorly as if still images are moving.

What's wrong?
Is system speed causing this or it is some kind of driver issue?
Computer is using system board's Built-in drivers. i.e. SiS 5597/5598.
Does display adapter's drivers need to be updated?

More about : poor video animations

June 23, 2002 6:40:57 PM

A Cyrix 333Mhz processor is actually about 250Mhz with a FSB of 83Mhz. I'd suggest that you upgrade your computer if you want decent multimedia. I have a feeling that you have not yet experienced anything approaching great performance with that system and WinXP, friend. I'm surprised that you were able to install the operating system without difficulty in the first place, being barely over the minimum WinXP system requirements for a processor. Personally, I would have installed Win98SE, which would have run much better.

<A HREF="http://www.upgradecenter.com/article.php3?article=12" target="_new">Cyrix MII-333</A>.

<A HREF="http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/home/howtobuy/upgrad..." target="_new">Windows XP Home Edition System Requirements</A>.

Toejam31

<font color=red>First Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=17935" target="_new"><font color=green>Toejam31's Devastating Dalek Destroyer</font color=green></A>
<font color=red>Second Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=15942" target="_new"><font color=green>Toey's Dynamite DDR Duron</font color=green></A>
__________________________________________________________

<font color=purple>"Some push the envelope. Some just lick it. And some can't find the flap."</font color=purple>
June 23, 2002 8:58:59 PM

Yeah, I don't know about Cyrix and Nt5.1.

You might drop back to Winme or 98 if Me doesn't work out well.
Related resources
June 23, 2002 11:12:01 PM

your not trying to play divx files on that are you?

how do you shoot the devil in the back? what happens if you miss? -verbal
June 24, 2002 1:10:07 PM

Offcourse I would have upgraded the system but that wasn't my personal system.
Like you I too was surprized when Win XP was not only comfortably installed on that system but it also exhibited "satisfactory" performance. I used
"great performance" because if, on Cyrix 333 MHz system, win XP runs smoothly, then I think it would be a "great performance" on that system.
Which system would you recommend for a real great performance all around???
June 24, 2002 2:16:39 PM

That depends on several different issues, such as the budget, the platform, the operating system, the user preferences, and the third-party programs that will be used. There are dozens of ways to customize a system. For example, a user who is willing to spend three grand on a system used primarily for gaming is going to get a different computer from me than one that costs four or five hundred and will be used mostly for surfing the Internet and checking email. Another computer could be tailored towards sound recording and multimedia programs of this nature, and yet another could have a RAID array of some kind and dual processors for working with digital video and AUTO-CAD. Some could be combinations of all of the above; less specific, but capable of doing several things fairly well.

This is in addition to deciding on the computer case, the cooling solution, whether the ISP is broadband or dial-up, if the computer is stand-alone or will be networked, the size and type of the display, etc. There are a lot of options.

If you want a "standard" all-around system, shop OEM, like Dell. But if you want a builder such as myself to assemble a system for you, I would need some pre-defined user parameters, and to know in advance how much money you are willing to invest. I could spend an hour doing nothing but listing various system configurations for you, but none of them might meet your particular needs.

Toejam31

<font color=red>First Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=17935" target="_new"><font color=green>Toejam31's Devastating Dalek Destroyer</font color=green></A>
<font color=red>Second Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=15942" target="_new"><font color=green>Toey's Dynamite DDR Duron</font color=green></A>
__________________________________________________________

<font color=purple>"Some push the envelope. Some just lick it. And some can't find the flap."</font color=purple>
June 24, 2002 3:16:00 PM

I want a standard system with little concern on price factor, which will be used for the following purposes;
1. Internet
2. Auto-Desk (Auto-CAD & other 3-D designing)
3. I want good performance in Multimedia too.
It will be so helpful if you assemble the system which would exhibit "great performance" in the above described fields.
Thanks in anticipation!
June 25, 2002 2:29:39 AM

Alright, I'll throw a couple of nice systems together, and you can check them out. But you didn't give me a lot to work with ... just AUTO-CAD capabilities, good multimedia performance, and that it should be a "standard system", which ignores more variables than I'd care to list in one online post! As such, I am deliberately going to avoid SCSI interfaces and dual-processors, just because of the additional expense. The same applies to AGP Pro cards.

Chieftec Dragon Aluminum AX-01SLD ATX Server Case
Enermax EG651P-VE (FMA) 550W Adjustable Fan Speed PSU
Five 80cm Quiet Panaflo fans
ASUS P4T533 Mainboard w/ATA133 RAID and USB 2.0
Intel 2.4GHz Northwood with 533MHz FSB
Retail HSF
One GB of Kingston 1066MHz RDRAM
Two 80GB Maxtor ATA/133 D740X Hard Drives
Gainward GeForce4 750XP Golden Sample G4TI4600 128MB
Santa Cruz 6-channel DSP Audio Accelerator
Canopus DVRaptor-RT
PlexWriter 40/12/40U CD-RW
Pioneer DVD-106S 16X ATAPI UDMA66 DVD-ROM Drive
3Com Fast Ethernet NIC
Sigma Designs REALmagic MPEG-4 Xcard
Microsoft Wireless Intellimouse Explorer
Microsoft Office Keyboard
Floppy Drive 3.5" 1.44MB
Klipsch ProMedia 5.1 Speakers
Iiyama Vision Master Pro 512 22" AG Monitor
Microtek Scanmaker 5700
Canon S750 Color Bubble Jet Printer

Or maybe something like this:

Lian-Li PC69B Black Mid-Tower Case
Enermax EG651P-VE (FMA) 550W Adjustable Fan Speed PSU
Three Blue Enermax Adjustable UC-8FAB 8cm Case Fans
ABIT KX7-333R Mainboard w/ATA133 RAID
AMD ATHLON XP 2100+ 1.73GHZ
Thermaltake Volcano 7+ HSF
One GB of Corsair 333MHZ (PC2700)CAS-2 184PIN DDR Memory
Two Western Digital Caviar 120GB 7200RPM Special Edition ATA100 Hard Drives w/8MB cache
Leadtek WinFast A250 Ultra TD GeForce4 Ti 4600
Terratec Promedia SiXPack 5.1+ Sound Card
Matrox RT2500
Lite-On LTR-48126S CD-RW
Lite-On LTD-165H 16XMAX DVD-ROM
D-Link DFE-550TX NIC
Logitech Internet Navigator Keyboard
Logitech Optical Dual-Sensor Mouse
Floppy Drive 3.5" 1.44MB
Logitech Z-560 THX Certified 4.1 Speakers
Sony GDM-F500 21" Monitor
Canon CanoScan N1240U
EPSON Stylus C80 Printer

Windows XP Professional or Windows 2000 SP2 as the operating systems.

I would think that most people would be fairly happy with either one of these systems. They may not be exactly "standard", but I don't build the average whitebox computer. If you want something that your mother might be happy with, go talk to Gateway.

I didn't bother to work up a price for either one ... that anyone can do, just by doing some shopping online. This is not an actual work order, so I didn't bother to total it up. Of course, this is just a start, because there's all sorts of goodies you can add, like side panel windows, cathode light kits, fan controls ... the possibilities are endless.

Toejam31

<font color=red>First Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=17935" target="_new"><font color=green>Toejam31's Devastating Dalek Destroyer</font color=green></A>
<font color=red>Second Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=15942" target="_new"><font color=green>Toey's Dynamite DDR Duron</font color=green></A>
__________________________________________________________

<font color=purple>"Some push the envelope. Some just lick it. And some can't find the flap."</font color=purple>
June 26, 2002 8:29:56 AM

Sorry for appearing late.
Thanks for your system recommendations!
I would like to go with Pentium rather than AMD, it seem a nice well balanced system all around.
I would like to discuss some more points.
1. In <b>MAIN BOARD</b> category, how do you compare <b>Intel</b> with <b>Asus</b>.
2. In <b>Hard Drive</b> category, what are your reviews about <b>Seagate</b>.
3. Which <b>CD ROM drive</b> you would recommend?
Anonymous
June 26, 2002 11:23:48 AM

it is because of your cpu which is too low. :( 


<i>if you know you don't know, the way could be more easy ...</i>
June 26, 2002 2:21:11 PM

Intel mainboards are usually solid, but the Phoenix BIOS is not very user friendly, and there are very limited features for overclocking and for checking the voltages. ASUS boards, depending on the model, normally have many more BIOS features and tend to cater to the overclocking crowd.

Seagate makes a lot of different hard drives. This is almost a trick question, because while one drive from a manufacturer may have a low RMA rating and perform very well for the majority of users, another may turn out to be a big fat lemon, such as the IBM 75GXP drives that were larger than 40GB. There are a lot of factors to be considered when choosing a drive that will determine it's life span, such as the amount of heat produced, the RPM speed, the platter density, the interface, user handling and maintenance, etc. I've had Seagate drives that lasted five years, and some that died in six months. Overall, I'd say that the company makes IDE drives that are generally reliable, and fast SCSI drives that need a really good cooling solution to last for two years or more. But at 10,000 or 15,000 RPM, I wouldn't expect a long life span from a SCSI drive. It's the nature of the beast.

The Seagate Barracuda ATA IV is a fairly nice drive, and is comparable to the IBM DeskStar 120GXP, although the DeskStar has slightly higher performance stats and tends to cost a little less.

Currently, I like Maxtor D740X and the Special Edition Western Digital drives, myself. That's why I listed them in the two configurations I posted for you ... nothing in either of those systems was chosen at random. Parts is parts, as they say ... but that doesn't mean you can just put anything together and have it be functional. It takes some hardware knowledge to select components for a system that will be a workable configuration that requires little in the way of troubleshooting.

It might interest you to know that I would expect the AMD system as listed above to be the faster of the two configurations, especially if the WD drives were set up in a RAID 0 array. And more overclockable, if that's your bag.

I don't install many standard CD-ROM drives, not with the advent of DVD-ROM and CD-RW drives. But if I had to choose a favorite, the Plextor UltraPleX 40max Ultra SCSI drive would be my choice, which is available as a kit with the SCAM SCSI card that has an internal 50-pin connector. As for IDE drives, I've always liked Afreey, QPS, Ricoh, TDK, Lite-On, Teac, and Acer. I don't think you could go wrong with any of those brands.

Toejam31

<font color=red>First Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=17935" target="_new"><font color=green>Toejam31's Devastating Dalek Destroyer</font color=green></A>
<font color=red>Second Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=15942" target="_new"><font color=green>Toey's Dynamite DDR Duron</font color=green></A>
__________________________________________________________

<font color=purple>"Some push the envelope. Some just lick it. And some can't find the flap."</font color=purple>
June 26, 2002 6:33:04 PM

Which modem would you like to recommend?
Also Single Chip OR Double Chip?
June 27, 2002 2:32:58 AM

Modem - V.90/92 56K modems or xDSL/Cable broadband modems?

"Also Single Chip OR Double Chip?"

Are you talking about single sided vs double sided RAM, or internal PCI single vs dual chip modems?

I don't really think it matters if I have a preference for either type of modem, as most manufacturers are moving to single chip designs to lower costs. 802.11b systems are becoming increasingly cheaper, and dual-band chipsets are costly to implement and really take up too much real estate on the printed-circuit board to make it feasible for a client form factor. I doubt that most users are going to willing to pay the extra cost, anyway.

Toejam31

<font color=red>First Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=17935" target="_new"><font color=green>Toejam31's Devastating Dalek Destroyer</font color=green></A>
<font color=red>Second Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=15942" target="_new"><font color=green>Toey's Dynamite DDR Duron</font color=green></A>
__________________________________________________________

<font color=purple>"Some push the envelope. Some just lick it. And some can't find the flap."</font color=purple>
June 27, 2002 8:22:25 AM

Quote:
Are you talking about single sided vs double sided RAM, or internal PCI single vs dual chip modems?

I am talking about internal PCI single vs dual chip modems which you have already discussed in your reply.
Well, I have heard a lot about double chip modems that they do not let you disconnected from the net as they have separate incomming and outgoing 'chips'.
I personally have never used them so cann't say to how much extent this is true.
What do you say?
Also your comments on "US Robotics"!
Anonymous
June 27, 2002 9:24:23 AM

US Robotics is a good brand for modems. i have one which i used since 2 years (maybe even 3 years...) without any issue at all. i have updated its communication protocol (because it is a flash modem) with the V90 8 months ago to fit the last specifications (it wasn't necessary to buy a new one). now i am on ADSL but only since round 5 months. this modem is now an emergency line if the ADSL becomes not available. before with the US Robotics i haven't had any unpleasant disconnection nor other kind of issues. it has a good price/quality ratio. with this sort of modem you can switch it on & forget it for a (long) while.

i think the question is most deciding to choice this type of connection or to go to ADSL which can be in some case a necessity. (speed ratio between ADSL modem/standard modem : 11 & above)


<i>if you know you don't know, the way could be more easy ...</i>
June 27, 2002 2:01:42 PM

I would prefer a single chip modem.

My choice in modems would also be a US Robotics, or 3Com. I prefer the external models, which allows freeing up a PCI slot, and the external models generally offer slightly greater performance and features. My all-time favorite is the US Robotics <A HREF="http://www.dooyoo.co.uk/product/17976.html" target="_new">56K Voice Faxmodem Pro</A>, model number 0525, which is the best I have ever used. Here's another <A HREF="http://www.streettech.com/archives_Hardware/faxModem.ht..." target="_new">link</A> to the same product. Unfortunately, they are becoming more and more difficult to locate, so if you want one, you may have to do some searching around the Net.

Toejam31

<font color=red>First Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=17935" target="_new"><font color=green>Toejam31's Devastating Dalek Destroyer</font color=green></A>
<font color=red>Second Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=15942" target="_new"><font color=green>Toey's Dynamite DDR Duron</font color=green></A>
__________________________________________________________

<font color=purple>"Some push the envelope. Some just lick it. And some can't find the flap."</font color=purple>
June 28, 2002 9:25:19 AM

And what about built-in versus non-builtin video and sound cards?
Also what is the major advantage of DDR over SDRAM? How can you determine whether the memory installed in a computer is DDR or SDRAM???

<b><font color=red><i>"All delays are dangerous in war."</b></font color=red></i>
June 28, 2002 2:22:18 PM

Quote:
And what about built-in versus non-builtin video and sound cards?

This depends entirely upon how the computer is going to be used. For a system that might be used for nothing besides browsing the Internet, picking up email, with limited multimedia demands, some users might be satisfied with onboard video. But for smooth game play, watching DivX and DVD movies, and working with graphic arts programs, in the main, onboard video is not the best choice. Perhaps an exception can be made of the nForce mainboards, which are based around a GeForce2 MX core. But even in that situation, you are looking at affordability ... not high-end performance.

Onboard video doesn't normally support high resolutions and refresh rates, so this isn't suitable for larger, powerful monitors with a high RAMDAC clock.

Here are some nForce links you might enjoy checking out:

<A HREF="http://www.xbitlabs.com/mainboards/nforce-1/" target="_new">NVIDIA nForce Chipset Review</A>

<A HREF="http://www.infosatellite.com/news/2002/03/h150302nvidia..." target="_new">Nvidia introduces DDR333-based nForces</A>

<A HREF="http://www.digit-life.com/articles/roundupmobo/" target="_new">VIA KT333 Mainboards Roundup</A>

In the past, onboard audio was a bad idea. Most people still avoid purchasing mainboards with onboard audio, or disable it in the BIOS, and install a decent sound card. Basically, it just sounded bad, and had little support for more than two ordinary low-wattage desktop speakers. Onboard audio chips often caused conflicts with other PCI devices, and their usage was demanding on processor cycles. This could slow down the computer considerably if the CPU was not that fast to begin with. But there have been some improvements recently in this area, with some mainboards now shipping with chips like the C-Media 8738-MX, with DirectSound 3D, Aureal A3D, and SPDIF digital support. This is still not in the same ballpark as a PCI sound card, but it is a vast improvement over the audio chips offered in the past.

If sound is not really a major consideration for you, a chip like this might be sufficient for your needs. For general game play, and mated with a fairly good set of speakers, you'll get satisfactory results. But if you are willing to invest in a good set of computer speakers, or if you wish to hook up your stereo system to the computer, and great sound <i>is</i> an important feature, installing a PCI sound card is still the preferred method.

In my experience, those people who try to save money when ordering a new system by cutting back in the areas of audio, video and memory tend to be disappointed in their purchase within a few months, and find themselves in a position where they are upgrading much sooner than expected. For example, if I had a choice between buying a system with a 1GHz processor with onboard video and audio, or buying a system with an 850MHz processor with a GeForce2 card and a SoundBlaster Live! Value card ... and the prices between the two systems were comparable, I'd purchase the system with the slower processor.

Now some links for information about memory, with the first one right here at THG:

<A HREF="http://www17.tomshardware.com/mainboard/00q4/001030/ind..." target="_new">DDR-SDRAM Has Finally Arrived</A>

Another typical article:

<A HREF="http://www.gamepc.com/labs/view_content.asp?id=sdrvsddr..." target="_new">SDRAM vs. DDR SDRAM</A>

On a subject like this, running the questions through a standard search engine will tell you more than you ever wanted to know about DDR and the differences/advantages over SDRAM.

Personally, I don't think it's truly a relevant issue anymore. If you want to run a new system with a high-end AMD processor, you are going to need DDR. If you want to run a new Intel processor and want the best performance, stick with RDRAM. It's as simple as that. I suggest that you avoid buying a "new" computer that only supports SDRAM, or trying to cut costs by getting a Pentium 4 system mated with DDR.

As for identifying the RAM in a system, there are several ways to go about this. The easiest, IMHO, is to flip through the mainboard manual. If you don't have a printed copy, many manufacturers offer downloadable manuals online. Most mainboards have a brand name and model number silk-screened somewhere on the board, and this is also searchable.

If you need to physically identify the RAM, check out this link:

<A HREF="http://www.kingston.com/newtech/ddrvssdram.asp" target="_new">DDR vs SDRAM Modules</A>

The two notches in the SDRAM module are a dead giveaway.

On the software end of things, for hardware identification within the GUI, a program like <A HREF="http://www.belarc.com/free_download.html" target="_new">Belarc Advisor</A> can come in handy, as it will build a profile of your hardware and software and display it in a browser window. Another program that is useful for this purpose is <A HREF="http://www.sisoftware.demon.co.uk/sandra/start.htm" target="_new">SiSoftware Sandra</A>.

Toejam31

<font color=red>First Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=17935" target="_new"><font color=green>Toejam31's Devastating Dalek Destroyer</font color=green></A>
<font color=red>Second Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=15942" target="_new"><font color=green>Toey's Dynamite DDR Duron</font color=green></A>
__________________________________________________________

<font color=purple>"Some push the envelope. Some just lick it. And some can't find the flap."</font color=purple>
June 29, 2002 1:00:56 PM

Thanks a lot for providing such a valueable information and useful links!

->Do Abit and Asus come with built-in sound and video cards?
Abit boards use "Soft Menu". This allows jumperless configuration of the board; that means, it will take the hassle out of configuring your motherboard.
->Does Asus also supports "Soft Menu" (i.e. Jumperless configuration of the Board)?
->For Intel 2.4 GHz Northwood processor which Main Board you suggest is the best;
<b><font color=blue>Abit</b></font color=blue> OR <b><font color=blue>Asus</font color=blue></b>


<b><font color=red><i>"All delays are dangerous in war."</b></font color=red></i>
June 29, 2002 3:22:09 PM

No problem; I'm a glutton for punishment. :wink:

As for your last questions though, these don't really fall into the area of technical support, which is what I try to provide here at the forum. I'd say that your best option is to visit the <A HREF="http://www.asus.com/index.asp" target="_new">Asus</A> and <A HREF="http://www.abit.com.tw/abitweb/webjsp/english/index.jsp" target="_new">Abit</A> websites, choose a board based on your needs, download the .PDF manual for the component, and start doing some reading about the features and specifications. This is something you'll need to do in any case before selecting a mainboard for your system, or you'll find yourself in a world-of-hurt when attempting an installation.

Note: If you don't already have the free version of <A HREF="http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html" target="_new">Adobe Acrobat</A> on the system for reading .PDF files, this would be as good a time as any to pick up a copy.

If you don't take the time to do the necessary research, you may get blind-sided.

After you've chosen a board, start looking around in the various online forums and see what kind of responses you find from other people who have installed the same board ... likes and dislikes, configuration problems (and the solutions to those problems, if mentioned), and how the board reacted to various devices, like different hard drives, NIC cards, sound cards, etc. Take your time ... don't be in any kind of rush. If the board is brand-spanking new, you might wish to wait a bit before ordering, and see how other people react to the board.

For instance, I'm a big Giga-Byte fan, and this is the mainboard brand I install the most often. However, there is a version of the GA-7VRXP mainboard with an onboard Promise RAID controller that is giving people sh!t fits, and so, despite my liking for these boards, I've learned (without needing to install a half dozen of them) that this might not be the best choice for my customers. As a result, I haven't ordered that particular board. If they want RAID, I'll steer them in another direction.

However, the <A HREF="http://www.giga-byte.com/products/7vtxh+.htm" target="_new">GA-7VTXH+</A> board from the same manufacturer is superb, and I wouldn't hesitate to install this board every day of the week. If WinXP Pro has ever liked a board more than this one, I haven't yet found it. But like many KT266a boards, it functions best at the default memory timing speeds, which is something to take into consideration. But it's a stable and feature-rich board (unless you are part of the mad :eek:  overclocking crowd) and surprisingly quick, despite this fact.

So you can see, it's not so much that one brand is better than another. When you are talking about the top-tier mainboard manufacturers, it's more about selecting an individual board, checking out its features, looking for user reviews and comments, reading website reviews, browsing though all the benchmarks ... and then settling down and doing the waiting game to see how it functions in the real world. After all, that's really what counts.

With that kind of attitude towards a new hardware purchase, you'll save yourself a considerable amount of grief. Let the impulse buyers and the guys who absolutely <i>must</i> have the latest and greatest buy the hardware and put it through its paces. <i>You</i> take note of the reactions, and then plan your purchases accordingly.

Toejam31

<font color=red>First Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=17935" target="_new"><font color=green>Toejam31's Devastating Dalek Destroyer</font color=green></A>
<font color=red>Second Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=15942" target="_new"><font color=green>Toey's Dynamite DDR Duron</font color=green></A>
__________________________________________________________

<font color=purple>"Some push the envelope. Some just lick it. And some can't find the flap."</font color=purple>
July 1, 2002 7:18:57 AM

Thanks Toejam! Discussion was very useful. I would soon be building up my new system, which ,I believe, would give "real great performance" all around.
Thanks again!

<b><font color=red><i>"All delays are dangerous in war."</b></font color=red></i>
!