Network Question

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Small home network with a wireless gateway router. Currently on dial up but
looking to change to broadband:

What kind of firewall do I need to install so a broadband service provider
can't see my attached computers- limited funds though, so inexpensive
please.
13 answers Last reply
More about network question
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    When you make the switch to broadband, your hardware (the cable or dsl
    modem) will have a hardware firewall built in that you can then customize.
    As for software, you don't need to spend a dime. Get Zone Alarm Free
    Edition. It will completely stealth your system. Since you mention it,
    what about your computers do you not want your ISP to see? The address?
    The hard drive and/or specific folders and files on the hard drive? You
    would be amazed at just what is possible in the information industry today.
    If someone wants to see what is on your computer, and they have the money,
    tools, and knowledge, there is nothing you can do short of disconnecting it
    to stop them from getting what they want.

    Remember, just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get
    you.

    "ed" <M@sk.ed> wrote in message news:d9l1cn$8np$1@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk...
    > Small home network with a wireless gateway router. Currently on dial up
    > but looking to change to broadband:
    >
    > What kind of firewall do I need to install so a broadband service provider
    > can't see my attached computers- limited funds though, so inexpensive
    > please.
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Why do you want to hide your computer from broadband service provider first
    of all ?

    Do they charge you based on the internet traffic you use ?

    If you are planning for a good security, go for Norton Internet security.
    Your router should also have a NAT firewall built-in
    --
    JonyBrv


    "ed" wrote:

    > Small home network with a wireless gateway router. Currently on dial up but
    > looking to change to broadband:
    >
    > What kind of firewall do I need to install so a broadband service provider
    > can't see my attached computers- limited funds though, so inexpensive
    > please.
    >
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    In article <#Bl6tPfeFHA.2420@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl>, "Kevin"
    <webman6@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"ed" <M@sk.ed> wrote in message news:d9l1cn$8np$1@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk...
    >> Small home network with a wireless gateway router. Currently on dial up
    >> but looking to change to broadband:
    >>
    >> What kind of firewall do I need to install so a broadband service provider
    >> can't see my attached computers- limited funds though, so inexpensive
    >> please.
    >
    >When you make the switch to broadband, your hardware (the cable or dsl
    >modem) will have a hardware firewall built in that you can then customize.

    I think that statement is too broad. I've seen lots of DSL and cable
    modems that are just modems, with no firewall or router built in.

    >As for software, you don't need to spend a dime. Get Zone Alarm Free
    >Edition. It will completely stealth your system. Since you mention it,
    >what about your computers do you not want your ISP to see? The address?
    >The hard drive and/or specific folders and files on the hard drive? You
    >would be amazed at just what is possible in the information industry today.
    >If someone wants to see what is on your computer, and they have the money,
    >tools, and knowledge, there is nothing you can do short of disconnecting it
    >to stop them from getting what they want.

    I think that statement is too broad. A properly configured hardware
    and/or software firewall makes a network and its computers invisible
    to other Internet users.

    >Remember, just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get
    >you.
    --
    Best Wishes,
    Steve Winograd, MS-MVP (Windows Networking)

    Please post any reply as a follow-up message in the news group
    for everyone to see. I'm sorry, but I don't answer questions
    addressed directly to me in E-mail or news groups.

    Microsoft Most Valuable Professional Program
    http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Jonybrv wrote:

    > Why do you want to hide your computer from broadband service provider first
    > of all ?
    >
    > Do they charge you based on the internet traffic you use ?
    >
    > If you are planning for a good security, go for Norton Internet security.
    > Your router should also have a NAT firewall built-in

    Avoid Norton Internet Security. There are other, better solutions, that
    are less resource intensive to boot. NAT is not a firewall.

    --
    Rock
    MS MVP Windows - Shell/User
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    When on broadband using a software firewall the isp can
    see how many computers are connected- if more than one they can disconnect
    as its against their acceptable use policy. A hardware firewall prevents
    them from seeing beyond the firewall- they see only one connection not how
    many computers are on the connection.


    "Kevin" <webman6@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:%23Bl6tPfeFHA.2420@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > When you make the switch to broadband, your hardware (the cable or dsl
    > modem) will have a hardware firewall built in that you can then customize.
    > As for software, you don't need to spend a dime. Get Zone Alarm Free
    > Edition. It will completely stealth your system. Since you mention it,
    > what about your computers do you not want your ISP to see? The address?
    > The hard drive and/or specific folders and files on the hard drive? You
    > would be amazed at just what is possible in the information industry
    > today. If someone wants to see what is on your computer, and they have the
    > money, tools, and knowledge, there is nothing you can do short of
    > disconnecting it to stop them from getting what they want.
    >
    > Remember, just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get
    > you.
    >
    > "ed" <M@sk.ed> wrote in message news:d9l1cn$8np$1@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk...
    >> Small home network with a wireless gateway router. Currently on dial up
    >> but looking to change to broadband:
    >>
    >> What kind of firewall do I need to install so a broadband service
    >> provider can't see my attached computers- limited funds though, so
    >> inexpensive please.
    >>
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Its because some ISP's ban you if you have more than one computer connected.
    I heard that software firewalls dont stop them seeing them.


    "Jonybrv" <Jonybrv@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:6CD6C821-F903-4D24-8183-4FAEB8DD67F4@microsoft.com...
    > Why do you want to hide your computer from broadband service provider
    > first
    > of all ?
    >
    > Do they charge you based on the internet traffic you use ?
    >
    > If you are planning for a good security, go for Norton Internet security.
    > Your router should also have a NAT firewall built-in
    > --
    > JonyBrv
    >
    >
    > "ed" wrote:
    >
    >> Small home network with a wireless gateway router. Currently on dial up
    >> but
    >> looking to change to broadband:
    >>
    >> What kind of firewall do I need to install so a broadband service
    >> provider
    >> can't see my attached computers- limited funds though, so inexpensive
    >> please.
    >>
    >>
    >>
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    In article <d9ljfd$ieb$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk>, "ed" <M@sk.ed> wrote:
    >Its because some ISP's ban you if you have more than one computer connected.
    >I heard that software firewalls dont stop them seeing them.

    A software firewall doesn't have an Internet sharing capability and
    can't allow multiple computers to access the Internet.

    Internet sharing typically uses hardware or software acting as a NAT
    router or proxy server.
    --
    Best Wishes,
    Steve Winograd, MS-MVP (Windows Networking)

    Please post any reply as a follow-up message in the news group
    for everyone to see. I'm sorry, but I don't answer questions
    addressed directly to me in E-mail or news groups.

    Microsoft Most Valuable Professional Program
    http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Your proposed broadband ISP will undoubtedly have an "Acceptable Use" policy
    wherein they specify how many computers you can use, as well as other
    allowable uses, such as Web servers, FTP, etc. Comcast, for instance, is very
    liberal in my area, and even offers limited support for router problems. Find
    this document and set your mind at ease.

    "ed" wrote:

    > Its because some ISP's ban you if you have more than one computer connected.
    > I heard that software firewalls dont stop them seeing them.
    >
    >
    > "Jonybrv" <Jonybrv@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:6CD6C821-F903-4D24-8183-4FAEB8DD67F4@microsoft.com...
    > > Why do you want to hide your computer from broadband service provider
    > > first
    > > of all ?
    > >
    > > Do they charge you based on the internet traffic you use ?
    > >
    > > If you are planning for a good security, go for Norton Internet security.
    > > Your router should also have a NAT firewall built-in
    > > --
    > > JonyBrv
    > >
    > >
    > > "ed" wrote:
    > >
    > >> Small home network with a wireless gateway router. Currently on dial up
    > >> but
    > >> looking to change to broadband:
    > >>
    > >> What kind of firewall do I need to install so a broadband service
    > >> provider
    > >> can't see my attached computers- limited funds though, so inexpensive
    > >> please.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    >
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    It sounds to me like you are confusing a "hardware firewall" with a
    broadband router. Contrary to belief, very few home broadband routers
    come with a hardware firewall. Almost every one of them DO come with
    Network Address Translation (NAT) built-in to them, but that is most
    definetely NOT the same thing as a hardware firewall.

    On Sun, 26 Jun 2005 06:26:08 +0100, "Alan Smith" <alan@hidden.email>
    wrote:

    >When on broadband using a software firewall the isp can
    >see how many computers are connected- if more than one they can disconnect
    >as its against their acceptable use policy. A hardware firewall prevents
    >them from seeing beyond the firewall- they see only one connection not how
    >many computers are on the connection.
    >
    >
    >
    >"Kevin" <webman6@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    >news:%23Bl6tPfeFHA.2420@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >> When you make the switch to broadband, your hardware (the cable or dsl
    >> modem) will have a hardware firewall built in that you can then customize.
    >> As for software, you don't need to spend a dime. Get Zone Alarm Free
    >> Edition. It will completely stealth your system. Since you mention it,
    >> what about your computers do you not want your ISP to see? The address?
    >> The hard drive and/or specific folders and files on the hard drive? You
    >> would be amazed at just what is possible in the information industry
    >> today. If someone wants to see what is on your computer, and they have the
    >> money, tools, and knowledge, there is nothing you can do short of
    >> disconnecting it to stop them from getting what they want.
    >>
    >> Remember, just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get
    >> you.
    >>
    >> "ed" <M@sk.ed> wrote in message news:d9l1cn$8np$1@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk...
    >>> Small home network with a wireless gateway router. Currently on dial up
    >>> but looking to change to broadband:
    >>>
    >>> What kind of firewall do I need to install so a broadband service
    >>> provider can't see my attached computers- limited funds though, so
    >>> inexpensive please.
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    It's not my question.
    Read what I said again. I didnt mention a router- you have.

    "NobodyMan" <none@none.net> wrote in message
    news:t0gub1hmkj0bub7to7s411v3t5g1kl5aun@4ax.com...
    > It sounds to me like you are confusing a "hardware firewall" with a
    > broadband router. Contrary to belief, very few home broadband routers
    > come with a hardware firewall. Almost every one of them DO come with
    > Network Address Translation (NAT) built-in to them, but that is most
    > definetely NOT the same thing as a hardware firewall.
    >
    > On Sun, 26 Jun 2005 06:26:08 +0100, "Alan Smith" <alan@hidden.email>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>When on broadband using a software firewall the isp can
    >>see how many computers are connected- if more than one they can disconnect
    >>as its against their acceptable use policy. A hardware firewall prevents
    >>them from seeing beyond the firewall- they see only one connection not how
    >>many computers are on the connection.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>"Kevin" <webman6@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    >>news:%23Bl6tPfeFHA.2420@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >>> When you make the switch to broadband, your hardware (the cable or dsl
    >>> modem) will have a hardware firewall built in that you can then
    >>> customize.
    >>> As for software, you don't need to spend a dime. Get Zone Alarm Free
    >>> Edition. It will completely stealth your system. Since you mention it,
    >>> what about your computers do you not want your ISP to see? The address?
    >>> The hard drive and/or specific folders and files on the hard drive? You
    >>> would be amazed at just what is possible in the information industry
    >>> today. If someone wants to see what is on your computer, and they have
    >>> the
    >>> money, tools, and knowledge, there is nothing you can do short of
    >>> disconnecting it to stop them from getting what they want.
    >>>
    >>> Remember, just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to
    >>> get
    >>> you.
    >>>
    >>> "ed" <M@sk.ed> wrote in message
    >>> news:d9l1cn$8np$1@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk...
    >>>> Small home network with a wireless gateway router. Currently on dial up
    >>>> but looking to change to broadband:
    >>>>
    >>>> What kind of firewall do I need to install so a broadband service
    >>>> provider can't see my attached computers- limited funds though, so
    >>>> inexpensive please.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    NobodyMan wrote:

    > It sounds to me like you are confusing a "hardware firewall" with a
    > broadband router. Contrary to belief, very few home broadband routers
    > come with a hardware firewall. Almost every one of them DO come with
    > Network Address Translation (NAT) built-in to them, but that is most
    > definetely NOT the same thing as a hardware firewall.
    >
    >So why do so many router manufacturers state that they include a hardware firewall,
    and even have the option to configure it, when you open their ip as a url?
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Jonybrv wrote:

    > Why do you want to hide your computer from broadband service provider first
    > of all ?
    >
    > Do they charge you based on the internet traffic you use ?
    >
    > If you are planning for a good security, go for Norton Internet security.
    > Your router should also have a NAT firewall built-in
    >
    Network Adress Translation (NAT) has nothing to do with firewalls. The
    fact that a router often employs both facilities doesn't prevent them
    from being mutually exclusive situations.
  13. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    On Tue, 28 Jun 2005 02:39:34 +0100, ClippertyClop
    <clipperty@clop.co.uk> wrote:

    >
    >
    >NobodyMan wrote:
    >
    >> It sounds to me like you are confusing a "hardware firewall" with a
    >> broadband router. Contrary to belief, very few home broadband routers
    >> come with a hardware firewall. Almost every one of them DO come with
    >> Network Address Translation (NAT) built-in to them, but that is most
    >> definetely NOT the same thing as a hardware firewall.
    >>
    >>So why do so many router manufacturers state that they include a hardware firewall,
    >and even have the option to configure it, when you open their ip as a url?

    A true internet router may well contain a hardware firewall, but they
    are very expensive and don't sit in very many homes. They sit at
    Service Providers and route traffice from thousands of requests.

    A BROADBAND ROUTER is the normal home variant, but is designed
    differently. You don't have to worry about managing routing tables -
    it doesn't query anything when sending requests to your ISP and store
    the IP addresses of your requests - IOW, it doesn't perform most of
    the functions of a true router.

    Most folks just plain don't understand the difference between a
    FIREWALL and NAT. Instead of trying to explain the difference, a lot
    of manufacturers take the path of least resistance and say they have a
    "firewall."

    My Linksys wireless router has a way of enforcing firewalls - it can
    check and ensure each machine accessing it on my local network is
    running Zone Alarm - and not allow a machine without it to access the
    net through the broadband router. That does NOT mean it includes a
    "hardware firewall."

    Rest assured, although there are a few broadband routers out there
    that do contain true hardware firewalls, they are few and far between
    - and cost more than the typical $50-$70 home broadband router.
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