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Help with Asus EeePC1000HA

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November 16, 2008 11:48:18 PM

Hi! I'm new to the forum. I recently purchased an Asus EeePC1000HA "netbook" (Intel Atom 1.6 GHz CPU, WinXP, 160 GB HDD) and am having trouble understanding the factory configuration and some of its features. I spent all last week trying to get answers from Asus tech support in California, both online and by phone, but I got nowhere. The four people I talked to at Asus knew nothing, absolutely nothing. Asus tech support, at least for the EeePCs, is useless, hopeless, non-existent.

I have to travel soon with this machine and I need to understand it. Are there people here in this forum who are familiar with it and could answer a few questions about it? I'd appreciate it a lot.

Thanks.
mikeys

More about : asus eeepc1000ha

a b D Laptop
November 17, 2008 4:22:17 AM

Well, what's the problem?
November 17, 2008 1:46:35 PM

. . .
Related resources
November 17, 2008 2:54:56 PM

Hi, frozenlead and dwellman. Thanks for replying.

Here are my questions:

1) Why is the OS in "Selective Startup" mode (System Configuration Utility [msconfig.exe])? Why are there three unchecked startup programs (Reader_sl, MsnMgr, Skype) in the "Startup" tab of the System Configuration Utility?

2) Why is "Internet Security" (IE Internet Options) set to "Custom"?

3) Why does the HDD have four partitions: C: (79.99GB NFTS), D: (61.20GB NFTS), PE (7.8GB FATS32), EFI (39MB)? What are they for?
----Are C: and D: for recovery purposes, so that data in D will not be lost when doing an OS recovery to C:?
----Does the supplied DVD allow for selective recovery options (not reformating D:) ?
----Is the 39MB EFI partition the Boot Booster? If so, does it need to be deactivated during a selective system recovery?
----Is the 7.8 GB "PE" FATS partition the WinXP OS, for doing a system recovery from the HDD? If not, what is it? If this partition is the WinXP OS, can it be copied from here to an external HDD for recovery purposes (when no external DVD drive is available for recovering from the support DVD?

4) Why does the Device Manager show two identical Intel Atom CPUs under "Processors"? This apparently makes the Task Manager show two graphs of CPU activity, whereas there is really only one CPU, isn't that right? (The Intel Atom is not dual-core so far as I know.)

5) Why does the Device Manager show two identical Mobile Intel 945 chipsets under "Display adapters"?

6) Why does the Device Manager show five identical Plug and Play Monitors under "Monitors"?

7) Do I need to update the BIOS (to BIOS 1206?) for reporting correct battery remaining time?

8) I ran System Information Collector (a Trend Micro Inc. diagnostic utility) on the computer. SIC found three instances of the startup.exe in the Installshield folder, indicating, I believe, that the OS was installed three times. Why?

9) Should the OS, WinXP SP3, be updated regularly from Microsoft? Are there any updates that will not work properly on this computer?

10) For longest battery life, should the battery always be left in the computer, or should it be removed when using the computer with AC and monitor (desktop use)? If it should or can be removed for desktop use, should it be removed charged or uncharged?

11) What is the correct setting for Super Hybrid Engine when using a CRT monitor?

12) What is the file "Advanced Configuration and Power Interface Drive for WinXP" in the Asus website downloads?

13) Why are there two WLAN drivers in the Asus website downloads?

Hope you can help with at least some of these.

mikeys
November 17, 2008 4:47:45 PM

mikeys said:
Hi, frozenlead and dwellman. Thanks for replying. Here are my questions:


Quote:
1) Why is the OS in "Selective Startup" mode (System Configuration Utility [msconfig.exe])? Why are there three unchecked startup programs (Reader_sl, MsnMgr, Skype) in the "Startup" tab of the System Configuration Utility?
The first time you use msconfig to "tweak" which programs launch on system startup it will go from normal to "Selective", which you can turn off by checking the box "Do not show this message again" (or something similar to that wording). There's nothing wrong with that. It's helping your computer start faster while using less memory. You can always launch those programs manually, on demand, when you want them.

Quote:
2) Why is "Internet Security" (IE Internet Options) set to "Custom"?
Kind of the same deal. When you accept certain prompts from IE, such as 'use autocomplete', or 'don't prompt me' when changing security zones, or other like things, you change the "default" settings of an IE security set. . . again, nothing wrong with that either. You can set it back to whichever you like, restart IE and use it for a bit, wait for some dialogue box or two to come up, click through them and check the Internet Security again and it will probably be 'Custom'

Quote:
3) Why does the HDD have four partitions: C: (79.99GB NFTS), D: (61.20GB NFTS), PE (7.8GB FATS32), EFI (39MB)? What are they for?
----Are C: and D: for recovery purposes, so that data in D will not be lost when doing an OS recovery to C:?
----Does the supplied DVD allow for selective recovery options (not reformating D:) ?
----Is the 39MB EFI partition the Boot Booster? If so, does it need to be deactivated during a selective system recovery?
----Is the 7.8 GB "PE" FATS partition the WinXP OS, for doing a system recovery from the HDD? If not, what is it? If this partition is the WinXP OS, can it be copied from here to an external HDD for recovery purposes (when no external DVD drive is available for recovering from the support DVD?
D is probably recovery
PE? http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc766093.aspx
EFI? http://www.intel.com/technology/efi/ and http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/device/storage/GPT_FAQ.mspx

Quote:
4) Why does the Device Manager show two identical Intel Atom CPUs under "Processors"? This apparently makes the Task Manager show two graphs of CPU activity, whereas there is really only one CPU, isn't that right? (The Intel Atom is not dual-core so far as I know.)
http://www.intel.com/technology/platform-technology/hyper-threading/index.htm
But, if you wan, you can delete both of them and restart. . . if they both come back, leave it alone.

Quote:
5) Why does the Device Manager show two identical Mobile Intel 945 chipsets under "Display adapters"?
This is a bit different . . you can also try deleting one or the other or both, restart and let Windows install what it wants. . .

Quote:
6) Why does the Device Manager show five identical Plug and Play Monitors under "Monitors"?
Another Windows foible. . . this happens. You can safely delete them all, if you want.

Quote:
7) Do I need to update the BIOS (to BIOS 1206?) for reporting correct battery remaining time?
Always use the latest stable firmware.

Quote:
8) I ran System Information Collector (a Trend Micro Inc. diagnostic utility) on the computer. SIC found three instances of the startup.exe in the Installshield folder, indicating, I believe, that the OS was installed three times. Why?


Quote:
9) Should the OS, WinXP SP3, be updated regularly from Microsoft? Are there any updates that will not work properly on this computer?
Yes.

Quote:
10) For longest battery life, should the battery always be left in the computer, or should it be removed when using the computer with AC and monitor (desktop use)? If it should or can be removed for desktop use, should it be removed charged or uncharged?
Batteries should be used from time to time. Not using your battery will not prolong its life.

Quote:
11) What is the correct setting for Super Hybrid Engine when using a CRT monitor?
Don;t know what you are talking about.

Quote:
12) What is the file "Advanced Configuration and Power Interface Drive for WinXP" in the Asus website downloads?
Always use the latest drivers from the chipset manufacturer's website, in your case, Intel. That should be enough. I always install OEM drivers, if I can't find them, then I'll instal from the system integrator site.

Quote:
13) Why are there two WLAN drivers in the Asus website downloads?
What do the descriptions say?
a b D Laptop
November 17, 2008 4:53:57 PM

Wow, alright then.

1. You're running in selective startup mode because someone modified the processes that begin when windows starts. As you've noted, they've stopped Adobe reader, MSN messenger, and Skype from starting when windows starts, speeding boot times. This isn't a bad thing. It means someone's actually used your machine (or that a very advanced mirroring program that wrote your hard disk's information had it pre-modified). Best buy will do you the same service for $49.

2. Internet security is set to custom...could be a number of things. Again, like in 1, someone (or a mirror) could have programmed it for you. All-in-all, though, it doesn't matter, because you should be using Firefox. :) 

3. a. I couldn't tell you. I'd have to see them. Read the manual, there might be something in there. I have a few hunches, though.

b. C is likely to contain your system files, meaning you can use D to store things and recover C without loss of D.

c. It is extremely likely your recovery CD will allow you to repair windows without reinstalling it.

d. If by "Boot Booster" you mean the program that puts jokes or whatever up while your computer is booting, no. That partition won't activate unless windows is loading - if windows doesn't load, the partition won't do anything.

e. It's likely this is an HDD recovery partition, yes. I can't tell you if you'll be able to move it and still use it - companies all use different software, and they all operate differently. I'm going to guess no, as the recovery partition will likely be updated while you're using your PC.

4. There are dual core Atom processors. Though your model is listed with an Atom N270, the Atom N330 is dual core. Could you check your processor model with CPU-z?

5. Couldn't tell you. Perhaps they updated the drivers and through a quirk both showed up.

6. Have you used any external monitors on this guy? It's likely someone else used one...is this unit used?

7. If you want. The machine runs okay now, you'll just get a more accurate battery time.

8. I don't think this is true. It may just mean that three instances of the installshield wizard were used with different versions that had reboot commands. I wouldn't be worried about it.

9. All the updates should work. Go ahead and update.

10. A subject of hot debate among many, many people. Personally, I really don't think it extends your battery that much to remove it and leave it out when using as a desktop. As long as you discharge/recharge the battery fully every so often, it will have a long, happy life.

11. Not relevant. The CPU clockspeed doesn't have anything to do with display output. If you're going to do an "intensive" application, use the speed bumping program. If not, save battery/power.

12. The ACPI driver is the how-to for power on any given computer for windows. It lets windows know how the notebook is powered and how to save power in different areas. This is where your battery timer comes from, as well as power saver/ high performance modes come from.

13. They're likely just different versions of one another.

I think you're being a bit to thorough, personally. I would be more worried about system performance than why IE has weird settings. Though, did you buy this used/open box/refurbished?
November 17, 2008 7:50:56 PM

Hi, dwellman, thanks for replying. You wrote:
Quote:
The first time you use msconfig to "tweak" which programs launch on system startup it will go from normal to "Selective",
I never tweaked it. It was in "Selective Startup" mode straight out of the box, the first time I ran msconfig.
Quote:
which you can turn off by checking the box "Do not show this message again" (or something similar to that wording).
I think you're referring to the popup you get when booting after making changes to msconfig. I never made any changes and never got that message. Someone at the factory apparently did, though, and checked that box, because as I say I was able to boot without getting the popup.
Quote:
There's nothing wrong with that. It's helping your computer start faster while using less memory. You can always launch those programs manually, on demand, when you want them.
The problem is that someone already made changes, there are programs listed in the "Startup" tab of msconfig that are unchecked, and it's running in "Selective" rather than "Normal" startup mode. I can just leave it the way it is, but my understanding of best practices is that once you've experimented with unchecking startup programs and running in Selective Startup mode, and decide on a final startup configuration, you should remove the unwanted startup commands from the registry (so they no longer appear in the startup routine list of msconfig) and return to "Normal" startup mode. Isn't it slowing down the startup routine to have applications listed as startup programs which are then stopped from running by being unchecked in msconfig?

Quote:
When you accept certain prompts from IE, such as 'use autocomplete', or 'don't prompt me' when changing security zones, or other like things, you change the "default" settings of an IE security set. . . again, nothing wrong with that either. You can set it back to whichever you like, restart IE and use it for a bit, wait for some dialogue box or two to come up, click through them and check the Internet Security again and it will probably be 'Custom'
Again, the problem is that this was done before I got the computer, apparently by the factory. Why would they put a custom configuration of security settings in IE instead of leaving the default ("Medium Security")? They must have had a reason. But since I don't know what it is, I can't try changing to the default because I will never be able to recover their custom settings, if they're necessary.

Quote:
D is probably recovery
Actually, D is empty. Or rather it has the minimum: the RECYCLER and System Information folders. C has the operating system and the Asus-added programs, and space left over to store files. It looks like Asus created these two partitions so that a system recovery could be performed on C alone without losing the files in D. But there's no way of knowing if the recovery routine in the BIOS allows for this as I have no external USB DVD drive for running the recovery DVD that came with it. Nor does Asus explain any of this in their FAQs. The tech support supervisor I spoke to at their US office didn't know, either. (duh...)

Thanks for the links. I read all that stuff, but the only thing I got from it is that PE may be needed for an OS recovery. Do you think it's on my hard disk so that the DVD recovery routine will work? That seems the likeliest answer. And maybe it's configured so that the recovery routine will only reformat C and leave D alone, which certainly would be an improvement over previous Windows recoveries.

Quote:
http://www.intel.com/technology/platform-technology/hyper-threading/index.htm
But, if you want, you can delete both of them and restart. . . if they both come back, leave it alone.
Hmmm...So The Intel Atom works a little like a dual-core CPU via hyper-threading? Okay, I'll buy that. I think I'll just leave it be. After all, the Device Manager has all sorts of stuff in it I never understood <grin>.

Quote:
This is a bit different . . you can also try deleting one or the other or both, restart and let Windows install what it wants. . .
Frankly, I'm afraid to mess with it. It's probably necessary for some reason, like being able to use both the LCD and an external monitor. I just get antsy when I see stuff in the Device Manager that I'm not used to, know what I mean?

Quote:
Another Windows foible. . . this happens. You can safely delete them all, if you want.
They don't seem to be destabilizing anything so I'll leave them alone for now.

Quote:
Always use the latest stable firmware.
Okay, I'll stop the boot next time I start up and check the BIOS version.

Quote:
Quote:
9) Should the OS, WinXP SP3, be updated regularly from Microsoft? Are there any updates that will not work properly on this computer?
Yes.
Uh-oh, I was afraid you were gonna say that. Trouble is, I screwed up my previous laptop (WinXP/SP1) by running an MS update and had to do a recovery. Sort of put me off the updating thing.

Quote:
Batteries should be used from time to time. Not using your battery will not prolong its life.
Okay, I'll do that. Here's a somewhat different battery question: Should the AC adapter be unplugged when I'm not using the computer, like overnight? I remember reading somewhere that it eventually damages the battery to have it always connected to a charger. What do you think?

Quote:
Don't know what you are talking about.
Ha-ha, you cracked me up. I had the same reaction from these Asus programs. Seems that the Asus Super Hybrid Engine lets you choose performance modes so as to save battery. It's kinda nice if it really works. The trouble is, they don't tell you when to choose which settings. Never mind, I'll just leave it in "Auto" mode and hope it does its thing.

Quote:
Always use the latest drivers from the chipset manufacturer's website, in your case, Intel. That should be enough. I always install OEM drivers, if I can't find them, then I'll instal from the system integrator site.
Okay, I'll do what you suggest.

Quote:
What do the descriptions say?
All they say is : "Wireless Lan Driver for WIN XP", both the same. What's more, both of them are way bigger than the driver listed in Device Manager for the Wireless Network Adapter. Weird, huh?

Mike
November 17, 2008 8:43:57 PM

Ok, alrighty. . .

I understang your trepidation for doing Windows Updates. First: here's a handy utility for doing backups: DriveImageXML from RealTime Software. Works great for Windows 2000 and XP and is totally free. Has aplugin for BartPE, too. Works better than "System Restore" because it is a full backup, not just some Microsoft core things. Personally, I've never used System Restore since it was introduced in Windows XP (although I found out later it could have saved me a reformat once. If you like something a little easier to use and is more secure, Carbonite.com is very reasonable and has no limit (well, ok, there is a per day bandwith limit, but more than enough to handle a base OS install)

Ok. . . have you read this? http://tweakhound.com/xp/xptweaks/supertweaks1.htm . Such a thing seems to me may be of interest to you.

I just checked my msconfig and it's in Selective. . . yip yip yip yahoo. When you "uncheck" a start up item, the OS moves the registry entry to
  1. HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Shared Tools\MSConfig\startupreg
. No benefit to manipulating the registry apart from appearances. . . there's no performce otherwise to have the entries there.

Also, while we're on the subject of start up, here's another interesting read: http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/tutorial44.html

Shoot, where'd all the time go?
November 17, 2008 9:27:55 PM

Hi, frozenlead. Thanks for replying. You wrote:

Quote:
You're running in selective startup mode because someone modified the processes that begin when windows starts. As you've noted, they've stopped Adobe reader, MSN messenger, and Skype from starting when windows starts, speeding boot times. This isn't a bad thing. It means someone's actually used your machine (or that a very advanced mirroring program that wrote your hard disk's information had it pre-modified). Best buy will do you the same service for $49.
Okay, I see that, and like you say it may be a good thing. But how do I get back into "Normal Startup" mode while leaving those three programs out of the startup routine? If I select "Normal Startup" in msconfig, they'll probably just be re-checked (on the Startup tab) the next time I boot.


Quote:
Internet security is set to custom...could be a number of things. Again, like in 1, someone (or a mirror) could have programmed it for you. All-in-all, though, it doesn't matter, because you should be using Firefox. :) 
I agree. I'll download Firefox and set it up tonight.

Quote:
I couldn't tell you. I'd have to see them. Read the manual, there might be something in there. I have a few hunches, though.
Nothing in the manual about it, nothing on the website, and the 5 tech support people I talked to at Asus (including a supervisor!) didn't know, either. :-(

Quote:
C is likely to contain your system files, meaning you can use D to store things and recover C without loss of D.
Yeah, that's what I'm hoping.

Quote:
It is extremely likely your recovery CD will allow you to repair windows without reinstalling it.
You mean there are diagnostic and repair programs now as part of the recovery and utilities suite? That would be a big improvement. As soon as I get around to buying an external USB DVD drive I'll take a look.

Quote:
If by "Boot Booster" you mean the program that puts jokes or whatever up while your computer is booting, no. That partition won't activate unless windows is loading - if windows doesn't load, the partition won't do anything.
According to the Asus website, their Boot Booster program is a startup routine that allows Windows to go right into the desktop while other OS components are loading, so you can start working right away. And the truth is that the desktop does come right up when I boot. But I don't trust the idea of working before the whole OS is loaded so I don't do it. Guess I'm conservative and maybe kinda chicken, too. <grin>


Quote:
It's likely this is an HDD recovery partition, yes. I can't tell you if you'll be able to move it and still use it - companies all use different software, and they all operate differently. I'm going to guess no, as the recovery partition will likely be updated while you're using your PC.
From the MS technotes that dwellman pointed me to, it seems that PE is a new MS mini-OS used for diagnostics and recovery. However, neither MS nor Asus say whether the OS mirror is included in the PE partition. So, until I actually do a recovery, I don't know if I can recover my OS right from the PE partition or if I have to use the DVD. Why Asus gives you stuff but doesn't explain how to use it is anyone's quess. It's just the inscrutable orient. Mix it with MS's penchant for hiding things that are on your hard disk, and wham!, we're right through the looking glass with Alice.

Quote:
There are dual core Atom processors. Though your model is listed with an Atom N270, the Atom N330 is dual core. Could you check your processor model with CPU-z?
It's definitely an N270. According to Asus specs, they never yet put a different Atom in their netbooks. However, I did some further checking on the web and discovered that the Atom can "emulate" a double core. They call it a "duo". Something to do with the way it threads, apparently. It's easy to overload, however, but it's pretty fast otherwise. I've got no complaints about the computer's performance. But then I don't do any gaming.

Quote:
Have you used any external monitors on this guy? It's likely someone else used one...is this unit used?
Brand spanking new, right out of the box. I've got a CRT monitor plugged into the VGA jack, but that's it. I could understand if there were two listed, one for the LCD and one for an external. But five? Weird.

Quote:
It may just mean that three instances of the installshield wizard were used with different versions that had reboot commands. I wouldn't be worried about it.
Maybe, although Trend's SIC is usually very good at ferreting out problems. I wondered if a triple-install might explain some of the dupes in Device Manager. Like maybe the guy at the factory who set up the machine forgot stuff and had to reinstall the OS twice, forgetting to delete the traces. It porobably doesn't matter, only my experience is that Windows doesn't like extraneous system stuff floating around. It's all that accumulated garbage that eventually causes a crash.

Quote:
All the updates should work. Go ahead and update.
Okay.

Quote:
As long as you discharge/recharge the battery fully every so often, it will have a long, happy life.
The battery on my last laptop gave up the ghost after four months :-( . BTW, what exactly do you think fully discharged is? When the battery monitoring program says it should be re-charged (10% left), or when the computer finally shuts down (around 5% left)?

Quote:
The CPU clockspeed doesn't have anything to do with display output. If you're going to do an "intensive" application, use the speed bumping program. If not, save battery/power.
Okay, gotcha.

Quote:
The ACPI driver is the how-to for power on any given computer for windows. It lets windows know how the notebook is powered and how to save power in different areas. This is where your battery timer comes from, as well as power saver/ high performance modes come from.
Thanks. I didn't know that.

Quote:
I think you're being a bit too thorough, personally. I would be more worried about system performance than why IE has weird settings.
I guess you're right, only I've had so many system crashes and loss of data in the past on other machines that I want to try and keep things organized and as clean and simple as possible.

Quote:
did you buy this used/open box/refurbished?
No, it was new. Which is why I worry about all the stuff that isn't default or standard. That said, I guess these days you have to live with a lot of unknowns. And I really like this little machine.

Thanks for all your help. I appreciate it.

mikeys
November 18, 2008 5:51:37 AM

Hi, dwellman. You wrote:

Quote:
here's a handy utility for doing backups: DriveImageXML from RealTime Software. Works great for Windows 2000 and XP and is totally free. Has aplugin for BartPE, too.
I'll take a look at it, although my understanding of this stuff (not much, admittedly) is that you can only put images onto CD/DVD media. Correct me if I'm wrong. (BTW, have you got a URL for RealTime Software? I can't find 'em.)

Quote:
Personally, I've never used System Restore since it was introduced in Windows XP (although I found out later it could have saved me a reformat once).
I've used it, and always had problems.

Quote:
If you like something a little easier to use and is more secure, Carbonite.com is very reasonable and has no limit
How could I restore it from the web if my computer crashed?

Quote:
I just checked my msconfig and it's in Selective. . . yip yip yip yahoo. When you "uncheck" a start up item, the OS moves the registry entry to
  1. HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Shared Tools\MSConfig\startupreg
. No benefit to manipulating the registry apart from appearances. . . there's no performce otherwise to have the entries there.
I've gotten those startup entries out of msconfig, in the past, by deleting them from the registry. 'course if you decide you want them back in Startup, that's another can of worms.

Quote:
here's another interesting read: http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/tutorial44.html
I'll check that out, too.

Quote:
Shoot, where'd all the time go?
I haven't slept for a week trying to get all this straightened out. Getting a new computer is like having a baby. Worse. <grin>

Thanks again.

mikeys
November 19, 2008 1:55:50 PM

Oh gosh I'm losing my mind! Runtime notRealtime. I've seriously been coding to long yesterday.

The correct URL for DriveImageXML is http://www.runtime.org/driveimage-xml.htm.

You can save images basically anywhere. But the caveat is you can only restore to partitions of equal or greater size. Things like Carbonite.com work for your data, which for a lot of people, including me, is something one does not want to trust to a system backup anyway.

My backup strategy is to make a baseline image (a minimal install of the OS and supporting applications). Once the computer is up, restore the user data in the background. (Oh, while I'm at it, Mondo Rescue is the best backup software I've used for *NIX.)

BartPE is a very useful utility. I usesually have two or three copies lying around, but, since I don't keep data on my computers, if one dies, it's pretty much the same to me re-installing the OS as running a re-image.

When I go on extended trips I take:
  • my General 5-in-1 Multi-Blade Precision Screwdriver (part number 735)*
  • A 2.5 external hard drive with ISO / EXEs for All my OSes and Programs
  • A USB thumb drive
  • Two blank CD-R
  • One blank DVD+R
  • One Cat6 patch cable.*
  • One Cat6 crossover cable.*
  • One Floppy drive (internal to my TP T42p, but also has USB attachment)*
  • Two formatted, never used, 3.5 inch 1.44 floppy disks
  • My cellular phone with unlimited data plan with modem use option
  • USB Charging / Data cable for said cellular phone
  • Mini Maglite LED (2 AA)*
  • 12v DC to 120v AC Inverter**
  • Gerber Truss Serrated***

    *These remain in my laptop bag (backpack) at all times when not in use.
    ** I keep this in the car, anyway.
    *** You never know when you might at an office party and there's nothing to cut the cake with. . . . A Boker Wharcom or, for a really nice one, a CRKT On-Fire are decent alternatives.

    Useful Windows programs section:
  • Avira Antivir Personal.
  • BartPE
  • SpeedFan (the SMART tool is great)
  • CPU-Z
  • GPU-Z
  • DriveImageXML (Backup)
  • ISO Recorder (make and record ISOs under Windows)
  • SyncToy
  • nLite (Slipstream Service packs and other things into Windows OS)
  • TweakUI
  • gvim (the best text editor in the known universe)
  • mGMaps (ok, this I run on my phone, but you can run it on your PC, with some tweaking-- add a USB GPS and bammo!)
  • Netstumbler
  • Putty
  • Bitvise Tunnelier (fastest SFTP client available, not as versitile as WinSCP)
  • uTorrent (you know, the Hotel's bandwith is under utilized, anyway)
    November 19, 2008 4:04:34 PM

    Hi, dwellman.

    You wrote:

    Quote:
    The correct URL for DriveImageXML is http://www.runtime.org/driveimage-xml.htm.

    Okay, thanks, got that and downloaded it.

    Quote:
    You can save images basically anywhere. But the caveat is you can only restore to partitions of equal or greater size.
    Will it let you backup to a drive that is smaller than the source drive, and to a partition that is smaller than the source partition? My S occupies only around 6GB in C on my comp-uter's hard drive. Can I use DriveImageXML to save it to a USB HDD of, say, 10GB?

    Quote:
    My backup strategy is to make a baseline image (a minimal install of the OS and supporting applications). Once the computer is up, restore the user data in the background.
    Sounds good.

    Quote:
    When I go on extended trips I take:
  • A 2.5 external hard drive with ISO / EXEs for All my OSes and Programs
  • Why a USB HDD instead of a DVD (containing the OSes and progs) and a DVD drive? Wouldn't that be safer? Is it because of the greater portability of a 2.5 HDD compared to a DVD drive? You've never had any trouble carrying around a HDD?

    Thanks for the lists of stuff. I don't know what a lot of them are, but I will find out.

    Cheers!

    mike

    November 19, 2008 6:25:23 PM

    No, DriveImageXML makes a compressed image of the drive, i.e. an image, so as long as you have enough space on the destination for the image (you can even create the image on the same drive-- thanks Shadow Copy Service!) you can put the image anywhere you wish, free space is not a issue.

    A 2.5 external drive, ESPECIALLY when off, is quite durable; also especially in its solid aluminum case. Holds a lot more data than a DVD-R-- dual layer or not-- with room to spare. Case and point: many of my OS ISOs ARE DVD images.

    Speaking of images. . . I forgot about Daemon Tools (optical drive emulator). I used to use it quite frequntly. . . not so much at the moment.
    November 19, 2008 8:20:08 PM

    dwellman, you wrote:
    Quote:
    DriveImageXML makes a compressed image of the drive, i.e. an image, so as long as you have enough space on the destination for the image (you can even create the image on the same drive-- thanks Shadow Copy Service!) you can put the image anywhere you wish, free space is not a issue.
    If my operating system occupies 6GB of an 80GB partition on a 160GB hard drive, can DriveImageXML save an image of it to an external 10GB hard drive?
    November 20, 2008 12:10:11 PM

    Yeeah, pretty much (chose the highest compression, of course, to make sure).

    But. . .

    You can only resotre to a 80 GB or larger partition.
    November 21, 2008 12:50:17 AM

    Quote:
    You can only restore to a 80 GB or larger partition.

    How come? Does DriveImageXML back up info about the original partition size?

    Do you know anything about this program:

    http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/copywipe.php
    !