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Pitfalls of Upgrading to Windows 7???

I recently did my first build (back in May), and I installed a copy of XP sp3 (32 bit). I'm running the core i7 chip on an Asus P6T motherboard.

I'm reading all the excitement and buzz regarding Win 7 and with the $50 pre-release pricing, there doesn't seem to be a better time to buy.

But I remember years ago when I upgraded to XP and got burned with so many incompatibilities...scanner and printers lost all their advanced capabilities because now I had to rely on MS for drivers, my MS force feedback joy stick was abruptly terminated, etc., etc. And I had several programs that just never did run correctly on XP.

So, what kind of problems and pitfalls would I be looking at if I went with Win 7? Will I likely end up having to spend a small fortune upgrading hardware and software?

Jack
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More about pitfalls upgrading windows
  1. Assuming semi recent hardware you should be fine on that aspect win7 had all my drivers except the sound card. All my software works fine so far it's warned me a few times there might be a problem but none have developed in the last two months. And all else fails win 7 has a xp compatibility mode that literally installs a full copy of xp that can be run as a virtual machine ensuring all software will work.
  2. i've had no hardware issues with 7, but the removal of support for edge-docking toolbars would have severely impacted me - it's a show-stopper for me. Fortunately this is easily fixed but i'm annoyed at having to reimplement something that was already there and removed just for the halibut.
    "You can have any color you want, as long as it's black" - Henry Ford
    "You can tailor your system to meet your needs, as long as your needs change regularly and you don't need frequently-used icons to be in useful spots and you like mousing to the very bottom of the screen hundreds of times per hour." - Microsoft

    If you often run multiple instances of programs, the new taskbar is another workflow hit, as doing so now requires a right-click then a left-click for second and subsequent instances. *picks nose*
  3. If your hardware works under Vista, there is an excellent chance that it will work with Windows 7. If you have hardware that is 5+ years old... then you should expect that it may not work with Win 7.
  4. The only hardware problems I've had was adding my Vizio 42" LCD TV as an external monitor to my Acer Ferrari 5000 laptop - the LCD TV (HDMI) turned an ugly purple/fusia color. Under XP it works fine. This is after trying different video drivers. But otherwise, you'll love 64bit Windows 7 it's creamy smooth and lots of hidden nice stuff. BF2142 game doesn't work but then again, it didn't work on vista either. I run an xp/windows7 dual boot is great.
  5. You might want to download and run the windows 7 upgrade advisor:
    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windows-7/upgrade-advisor.aspx
  6. The Upgrade advisor does not indicate if you have any issues with the 64bit version, though the main components (CPU, Ram etc.) are stated as being compatible, so what about all the hardware it claims is compatible, is that referring to both versions?

    Running 32bit XP Pro SP3 with alot of hardware, can attach the advisor result if needed.
  7. Yes, my understanding is it refers to both versions.
  8. tmike said:
    i've had no hardware issues with 7, but the removal of support for edge-docking toolbars would have severely impacted me - it's a show-stopper for me. Fortunately this is easily fixed but i'm annoyed at having to reimplement something that was already there and removed just for the halibut.
    "You can have any color you want, as long as it's black" - Henry Ford
    "You can tailor your system to meet your needs, as long as your needs change regularly and you don't need frequently-used icons to be in useful spots and you like mousing to the very bottom of the screen hundreds of times per hour." - Microsoft

    If you often run multiple instances of programs, the new taskbar is another workflow hit, as doing so now requires a right-click then a left-click for second and subsequent instances. *picks nose*

    I like the new taskbar, but if you find it irritating, you can easily set it to not combine multiple instances of a single program into one icon. Right click the taskbar, and go to properties and you can change its behavior.
  9. I built a new system in May and used Windows 7 RC from the start. As I have a Technet membership, I am now running Windows 7x64 Ultimate. The only 2 'issues' I have had with the RTM are sure to be corrected by October:

    1. I have an ASUS P6T Deluxe V2 and my Intel chipset drivers defaulted to an older version despite running the ASUS package. I used a command line flag found in the README from Intel and forced the driver upgrade. ASUS will correct the issue.

    2. I have an HP OfficeJet Pro 8500 Premier All-In-One and while a default driver loads and is functional, the additional software from HP for the all-in-one functionality does not really work with Windows 7 yet. HP has already stated that it will be fully functional at Windows 7 release.

    As an early adopter I can't really complain. My system is rock solid and I have seen absolutely no instability.

    @Tmike - you can shift-left click to open new instances of programs as well.
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