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Solid State Drives

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June 23, 2004 4:27:57 AM

I have been looking all over for a consumer level solid state drive. Through my searching I have only found SSD that are made for the enterprise or military enviornment.

Are there any consumer level SSD out there that don't cost an arm and a leg and that have capacities larger that 2gigs?

Has no company thought of this yet?

I did see an article on geek.com that referenced a piece of hardware that allowed you to insert memory DIMMS into a device that had an ide interface and was recognized as a physical drive. It also had a battery that kept the memory alive after you turned off your system.

Am I the only one who sees potential in a device like this?
I mean even the slowest, cheapest memory (SDR SDRAM) would leave the fastest drives in the dust(even though that much memory would still be expensive).

I am itching to saturate my ATA bus...anyone know of any good products?

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a b } Memory
June 23, 2004 4:54:27 AM

Wow, I tried to get this started a few years ago, I'm glad someone actually did. At the time I was looking for an electrical engineering student to design a SSD for me that used DIMMs and a battery, and fit into a 5.25" drive bay. I was going to get some samples produced at my school if they provided the design.

I hope you find it.

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June 24, 2004 5:13:59 PM

I saw a RocketDrive which was a PCI card with four 1 GB PC133 dimms for a total of 4 GB. I could read at 110 MB, and write at 80 MB in HD Tach. The only problem is that its on the PCI bus, and that maxes at 133 MB. If we could get one with DDR memory and PCI Express, we could have a drive that would put SCSI to shame.
a b } Memory
June 24, 2004 9:25:08 PM

Putting the device on an IDE, SCSI, or SATA header allows multiple drives to use one controller, as opposed to multipe drive using many PCI slots.

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