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Next Windows 64-bit exclusive?

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  • Windows 7
Last response: in Windows 7
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Should the next version of Windows be 64-bit exclusive?

Total: 15 votes (2 blank votes)

  • Yes
  • 85 %
  • No
  • 8 %
  • Not the next version, but the following version after that.
  • 8 %
March 14, 2010 7:18:21 PM

Just a bit of a discussion and to see what the general opinions are on this. With the growing popularity of 64-bit computing, do you think that Microsoft should abandon support for 32-bit architecture with the next version of Windows and put efforts into further driving on the 64-bit evolution? I think a lot of users have 4GB or more RAM installed in their computers and so already use 64-bit Windows. Also software companies are starting to catch up on the 64-bit trend and most applications now have a 64-bit version. Is it now the time to enforce this as the standard?

Just wanted to hear everybody's thoughts on this topic. I think that maybe the next version of Windows would be too soon but it has to happen at some point so maybe the version after that would be a good starting point. Let me know what you think!



More about : windows bit exclusive

a c 215 $ Windows 7
March 14, 2010 7:31:57 PM

Voted Yes. However, given my vote, I do believe they should extend support for 32 bit Windows 7 by say... an extra year or so for anyone wanting/needing to run it in a virtual machine. By the time the next Windows version hits store shelves, 4GB of ram will be mainsteam (probably more like 8GB at that point), All CPU's (hint, hint... Intel) will have 64 bit instruction sets built in, and kids getting into the world of computing will start asking "You mean programs at one point only had access to a measly 4GB of RAM?"

In case you hadn't noticed, I'm eager for 32 bit Windows to die off :) ...
a b $ Windows 7
March 14, 2010 7:42:28 PM

Windows 7 is the third version of Windows to support 64-bit. So, yes - it's time to knock 32-bit on the head. They've done it with Windows Server, so I suspect it will happen with the next desktop version.
a b $ Windows 7
March 14, 2010 7:58:47 PM

^ Exactly what I was going to say. I also do wish that they include a new file system. NTFS is getting really old now. I want a file system that has SSD and next gen (4KB blocks) HDD optimization.

edit:
Or adopt ext4 :lol: 
March 14, 2010 8:13:12 PM

Voted yes. Perhaps it'll kick start developers into making 64bit versions aswell. I'm looking at you firefox.
March 14, 2010 8:18:00 PM

Lewis57 said:
Voted yes. Perhaps it'll kick start developers into making 64bit versions aswell. I'm looking at you firefox.


I too am waiting to get my hands on a 64-bit version of Firefox. Considering it's arguably the main competitor to IE, it doesn't look great that IE has a 64-bit version but there's no news of one anytime soon for Firefox. Maybe version 4...!
a b $ Windows 7
March 14, 2010 8:20:45 PM

Lewis57 said:
Voted yes. Perhaps it'll kick start developers into making 64bit versions aswell. I'm looking at you firefox.

Firefox is open source. Can't you just get the source and compile it as a 64-bit executable? Actually, it's already been done.
a b $ Windows 7
March 14, 2010 8:41:31 PM

Ijack said:
Firefox is open source. Can't you just get the source and compile it as a 64-bit executable? Actually, it's already been done.

Yup. I'v been running ForeFox x64 alpha builds for quite some time now.
a c 209 $ Windows 7
March 14, 2010 8:45:01 PM

Windows Server 2008 R2 is already offered only in the 64-bit version.

With the popularity of 64-bit Windows 7, every new piece of hardware should have 64-bit drivers and every new software package, be it 64-bit or 32-bit, should be compatible with it. By the time we get to Windows 8 there should be no need for a 32-bit version of the OS.

To be clear, though, I do think that Windows 8 needs to support 32-bit programs. There are a heck of a lot of programs that don't need tons of memory space and which work perfectly well as 32-bit programs. I expect everything will eventually end up as 64-bit, but I'm sure that an awful lot of 32-bit applications will still be around when the next version of Windows launches.
a c 215 $ Windows 7
March 14, 2010 8:57:47 PM

sminlal said:
To be clear, though, I do think that Windows 8 needs to support 32-bit programs. There are a heck of a lot of programs that don't need tons of memory space and which work perfectly well as 32-bit programs. I expect everything will eventually end up as 64-bit, but I'm sure that an awful lot of 32-bit applications will still be around when the next version of Windows launches.


I can't see Microsoft not supporting 32 bit apps within a 64 bit OS. They only just dropped 16 bit code support within the OS with Windows 7...
a b $ Windows 7
March 14, 2010 9:16:15 PM

The_Prophecy said:
They only just dropped 16 bit code support within the OS with Windows 7...

I don't think any of the 64-bit Windows have supported 16-bit programs. I'm pretty sure XP64 didn't.

But I agree that I don't see Microsoft dropping 32-bit program support any time soon.
a c 209 $ Windows 7
March 14, 2010 10:49:29 PM

The thing is that some people with 64-bit Windows seem to be a little outraged that 64-bit versions of some applications aren't available. But really, for a lot of applications it's just not necessary.

Web browsers come to mind as being a bit of a lightning rod for 64-bit support, but there are very, very few users who can get so much stuff going in a browser that they run out of 32-bit address space.
March 14, 2010 11:53:39 PM

Voted yes .... memory is so cheap that 4gb can be the least memory you can buy ... a waste of 1gb if 32bit is used
December 1, 2012 9:05:13 AM

"The thing is that some people with 64-bit Windows seem to be a little outraged that 64-bit versions of some applications aren't available. But really, for a lot of applications it's just not necessary."

There are people who are of the mindset that you shouldn't do something until you need it and there are people who are of the mindset that if it's available, you should use it. My take is somewhere in between, but we're at the point now where continuing to only use 64-bit if there's a definitive benefit is just dragging out the transition period where we have an annoying mix of 32-bit and 64-bit software that don't really play nice with each other. I think it's time to go 64-bit for everything no matter what just to end the transition period.

We have 64-bit browsers, and Adobe has made 64-bit Flash. There's even 64-bit Winzip and similar .zip utilities. I use the 64-bit version of Office and it works flawlessly. The only thing I use that isn't 64-bit yet is Unity, but I've read that it's coming. Frostbite is making their next Unreal game engine 64-bit only (yay!) so that will finally get the ball rolling in the gaming scene.
!