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RPG Genres - How many are there are which are the key ones.

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June 17, 2005 2:35:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.misc (More info?)

RPG Genres - How many are there are which are the key ones

If someone asked you which genres you played and which were the
most important genres - how would you reply. So far I have:

Any
Anime
Cartoon
Cyberpunk
Detective
Historical
Horror
Fantasy
High Fantasy
Low Fantasy
Present Day
Science Fiction
Superheroes
WoD

If you can add more to this list or come up with a sensible
classification that removes some of the overlap - that would
really be appreciated.

Naturally other possible meanings of the word genre (method
actor, gamer, etc.) aren't needed.

I'm trying to classify games. I have:
1. mode of play - In person / PBM / etc
2. style of play - gamer / actor / experiential
3. narrative style - gamer / storytelling / simulation / etc
4. system - d20 / d6 / etc
5. game - D&D / CoC / WHFR / etc
6. genre - see above

If you also want to suggest what the key classes are (in 1 - 6)
- that would be a big help too me as well.

More about : rpg genres key

Anonymous
June 17, 2005 2:35:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.misc (More info?)

On Fri, 17 Jun 2005, Oberon wrote:

> RPG Genres - How many are there are which are the key ones
>
> If someone asked you which genres you played and which were the
> most important genres - how would you reply. So far I have:
>
> Any
> Anime
> Cartoon
> Cyberpunk
> Detective
> Historical
> Horror
> Fantasy
> High Fantasy
> Low Fantasy
> Present Day
> Science Fiction
> Superheroes
> WoD
>
> If you can add more to this list or come up with a sensible
> classification that removes some of the overlap - that would
> really be appreciated.
>
> Naturally other possible meanings of the word genre (method
> actor, gamer, etc.) aren't needed.
>
> I'm trying to classify games. I have:
> 1. mode of play - In person / PBM / etc
> 2. style of play - gamer / actor / experiential
> 3. narrative style - gamer / storytelling / simulation / etc

Two styles here: campaign and storytelling. Campaign goes with fleshing
out the world, and trying to let the players explore. Storytelling goes
with trying to tell the most interesting story about the players
characters as possible.

> 5. game - D&D / CoC / WHFR / etc
> 6. genre - see above
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 2:35:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.misc (More info?)

For genres, you forgot pulp. Not as popular as it has been in the past, but
there is always someone out there who wants to play a character like the
Shadow or Doc Savage. Many attempts have been made at this genre, including
Justice Inc. and Adventure! but none have really taken hold. GURPS also has
the Cliffhangers supplement that covers this genre.
"Oberon" <oberon@solstice.com> wrote in message
news:1495b1l88gk9f8mvkaep8dlnsfuk392mei@4ax.com...
> RPG Genres - How many are there are which are the key ones
>
> If someone asked you which genres you played and which were the
> most important genres - how would you reply. So far I have:
>
> Any
> Anime
> Cartoon
> Cyberpunk
> Detective
> Historical
> Horror
> Fantasy
> High Fantasy
> Low Fantasy
> Present Day
> Science Fiction
> Superheroes
> WoD
>
> If you can add more to this list or come up with a sensible
> classification that removes some of the overlap - that would
> really be appreciated.
>
> Naturally other possible meanings of the word genre (method
> actor, gamer, etc.) aren't needed.
>
> I'm trying to classify games. I have:
> 1. mode of play - In person / PBM / etc
> 2. style of play - gamer / actor / experiential
> 3. narrative style - gamer / storytelling / simulation / etc
> 4. system - d20 / d6 / etc
> 5. game - D&D / CoC / WHFR / etc
> 6. genre - see above
>
> If you also want to suggest what the key classes are (in 1 - 6)
> - that would be a big help too me as well.
>
Related resources
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 4:05:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.misc (More info?)

Oberon <oberon@solstice.com> wrote:
> RPG Genres - How many are there are which are the key ones
>
> If someone asked you which genres you played and which were the
> most important genres - how would you reply. So far I have:
>
> Any
> Anime
> Cartoon
> Cyberpunk
> Detective
> Historical
> Horror
> Fantasy
> High Fantasy
> Low Fantasy
> Present Day
> Science Fiction
> Superheroes
> WoD

Steampunk
Illuminated
Espionage

What kind of genre is "Any"? Anything that doesn't fit in any of the
other categories?

Ofcourse lots of games combine several genres. I'm not just talking
about cyberpunk/fantasy (like Shadowrun), present day/detective,
SF/espionage, illuminated fantasy, etc.


mcv.
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 4:09:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.misc (More info?)

oberon ATsolstice DOT com wrote:
>RPG Genres - How many are there are which are the key ones
>
>Any

That about covers it all.

But you did miss my favorite:

Animals (e.g., Bunnies & Burrows)

--
Steffan O'Sullivan sos@panix.com Plymouth, NH, USA
---------------------- http://www.panix.com/~sos ---------------------
"We demand rigidly defined areas of doubt and uncertainty!"
-Douglas Adams
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 5:22:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.misc (More info?)

Oberon <oberon@solstice.com> wrote:
>RPG Genres - How many are there are which are the key ones

>If someone asked you which genres you played and which were the
>most important genres - how would you reply. So far I have:

>Any

By any do you mean universal games like GURPS and Hero?


>Anime
>Cartoon
>Cyberpunk
>Detective
>Historical
>Horror
>Fantasy
>High Fantasy
>Low Fantasy
>Present Day
>Science Fiction
>Superheroes
>WoD

I don't think World of Darkness is a genre unto itself,
though it's certainly the best known example of its genre.
I'd call it Horror if I had to choose just one category,
or Horror/Fantasy/Superheroes if I can mix and match.

Honestly, going by your list above I think we can narrow
the main list down considerably.

Realistic
Science Fiction
Fantasy

Just about everything I can think of will fit in those categories,
at least if you smoosh it up right. There are no hard and sure
boundaries between what's realistic and what's science fiction,
or what's science fiction and what's fantasy, or whatever, but
these three categories strike me as ones that most people would
be willing to agree fit the "I know it when I see it" test.
That doesn't mean there wouldn't be a LOT of disagreement
over where exactly a given sub-genre fits, of course, but
most people will be able to at least come up with their own
lists pretty easily, and that can serve as a basis for comparison.

However, if you want to list all the big genres and/or
sub-genres without worrying about greater classification,
the only one I can think of that you missed was post-
apocalyptic. It's big enough (or was, at least) to
merit its own entry even though it's just a specialization
of either Science Fiction or Fantasy, depending on how
hard you like your science.

Ooh, Western is another good one that's not as popular
today as it has been in the past. It's a subcategory
of Historical, obviously, but big enough to deserve a
separate mention.

You might also throw humorous in there, though it's a
modifier more than a genre unto itself. And if we are
including modifiers, there are also the many games that
pride themselves on being very simple. I'm thinking of
stuff like Risus or TWERPS, here. Like the humorous
games, they can be of any or all genres, but I think
there are enough of them that they deserve mention in
some way.

Another important modifier is the cross-genre mix.
Games like GURPS and Hero allow you to mix and match
as you wish, of course, but games like Shadowrun and
Deadlands and others that of course I'm blanking on
right now have a single setting that deliberately
incorporates two or more usually separate genres.

And then there are games based on books, movies, TV shows,
whatever. Some, like GURPS The Prisoner, are fun little
one-offs that fans enjoy but don't make much impact on
the world of gaming as a whole. Others, like Marvel or
DC Superheroes, Call of Cthulhu and Star Wars, are very
big deals and have an existence and popularity that
isn't solely dependent on the original property they're
based on.

So. Genre modifiers. Here's my list:

Humorous
Simple/Easy
Mixed Genre
Licensed Property

>If you can add more to this list or come up with a sensible
>classification that removes some of the overlap - that would
>really be appreciated.

If you're at all interested in listing the major sub-genres,
there's going to be lots of overlap. And we could argue for
a long time about which sub-genres deserve their own mention
and which should just be assumed to fit under the larger
categories. Cyberpunk is pretty obviously part of the
science fiction genre, for example (crossed with fantasy
for things like Shadowrun) but can Horror be seen as part
of the fantasy genre? I think so, at least if we're using
a broad definition of fantasy, but Horror is definitely
a big enough genre to deserve its own listing.

>6. genre - see above

>If you also want to suggest what the key classes are (in 1 - 6)
>- that would be a big help too me as well.

Key examples, you mean? I'll give it a shot, but in another
post since this one is getting way too long.

Pete
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 5:30:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.misc (More info?)

My thoughts on the big names in each category below.


ANY

If this means universal games, then you've got GURPS and
Hero at the top of the list.

CARTOON

Toon, hands down. I can't even think of any other good
examples, though I know they're out there.

CYBERPUNK

Cyberpunk, of course. Shadowrun. Can't think of any more.

HORROR

Call of Cthulhu.

HIGH FANTASY

Dungeons and Dragons, baby. Thirty years and still the champeen.
In size, popularity and influence, at least, even if there are
better games out there.

LOW FANTASY

I'll go with Warhammer FRP, though it won't necessarily fit
everyone's definition of low fantasy.

SCIENCE FICTION

Traveller? Never played it, myself.

SUPER HEROES

Champions and Marvel Superheroes are my choices.

POST APOCALYPSE

Can't beat Gamma World.

HUMOROUS

Toon and Paranoia?

MIXED GENRE

Shadowrun and Deadlands are the only good examples to come to
mind.

LICENSED PROPERTY

I'd say Call of Cthulhu is the greatest of all of them.

Pete
June 17, 2005 6:09:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.misc (More info?)

On 17 Jun 2005 12:05:54 GMT, mcv <mcvmcv@xs4all.nl> wrote:

>Oberon <oberon@solstice.com> wrote:
>> RPG Genres - How many are there are which are the key ones
>>
>> If someone asked you which genres you played and which were the
>> most important genres - how would you reply. So far I have:
>>
>> Any
>> Anime
>> Cartoon
>> Cyberpunk
>> Detective
>> Historical
>> Horror
>> Fantasy
>> High Fantasy
>> Low Fantasy
>> Present Day
>> Science Fiction
>> Superheroes
>> WoD
>
>Steampunk
>Illuminated
>Espionage

OK I'm familiar with Steampunk and Espionage but I don't even
know what Illuminated is. Does Illuminated really have an entire
genre to itself? Is it the SJ game with the Triangle I've never
played?

>What kind of genre is "Any"? Anything that doesn't fit in any of the
>other categories?

Yes. Anything. I should've edited it out. I doesn't count.

Thinking about it Espionage, Horror, Detective and maybe plain
Adventure could take place in a Steampunk, Supers or Fantasy
setting - so maybe there's are really two sub-divisions here:
Setting and Genre?

>Ofcourse lots of games combine several genres. I'm not just talking
>about cyberpunk/fantasy (like Shadowrun), present day/detective,
>SF/espionage, illuminated fantasy, etc.
>
>mcv.
June 17, 2005 6:12:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.misc (More info?)

On Fri, 17 Jun 2005 08:24:24 -0400 (EDT), Lena B Katz
<lbk@andrew.cmu.edu> wrote:

>
>
>On Fri, 17 Jun 2005, Oberon wrote:
>
>> RPG Genres - How many are there are which are the key ones
>>
>> If someone asked you which genres you played and which were the
>> most important genres - how would you reply. So far I have:
>>
>> Any
>> Anime
>> Cartoon
>> Cyberpunk
>> Detective
>> Historical
>> Horror
>> Fantasy
>> High Fantasy
>> Low Fantasy
>> Present Day
>> Science Fiction
>> Superheroes
>> WoD
>>
>> If you can add more to this list or come up with a sensible
>> classification that removes some of the overlap - that would
>> really be appreciated.
>>
>> Naturally other possible meanings of the word genre (method
>> actor, gamer, etc.) aren't needed.
>>
>> I'm trying to classify games. I have:
>> 1. mode of play - In person / PBM / etc
>> 2. style of play - gamer / actor / experiential
>> 3. narrative style - gamer / storytelling / simulation / etc
>
>Two styles here: campaign and storytelling. Campaign goes with fleshing
>out the world, and trying to let the players explore. Storytelling goes
>with trying to tell the most interesting story about the players
>characters as possible.

Agreed. I've noticed that I'm a campaign person. When asked to
create a character I create a load of story-lines that give the
GM hooks to further the narrative. I hardly ever say anything
about WHO I AM? I can tell the GM what my character does, what
s/he wants, who s/he's friendly with - but can never say - who
s/he IS.

>> 5. game - D&D / CoC / WHFR / etc
>> 6. genre - see above
June 17, 2005 6:20:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.misc (More info?)

On 17 Jun 2005 13:22:48 GMT, Peter Meilinger <mellnger@bu.edu>
wrote:

>Oberon <oberon@solstice.com> wrote:
>>RPG Genres - How many are there are which are the key ones
>
>>If someone asked you which genres you played and which were the
>>most important genres - how would you reply. So far I have:
>
>>Any
>
>By any do you mean universal games like GURPS and Hero?
>
>
>>Anime
>>Cartoon
>>Cyberpunk
>>Detective
>>Historical
>>Horror
>>Fantasy
>>High Fantasy
>>Low Fantasy
>>Present Day
>>Science Fiction
>>Superheroes
>>WoD
>
>I don't think World of Darkness is a genre unto itself,
>though it's certainly the best known example of its genre.
>I'd call it Horror if I had to choose just one category,
>or Horror/Fantasy/Superheroes if I can mix and match.
>
>Honestly, going by your list above I think we can narrow
>the main list down considerably.
>
>Realistic
>Science Fiction
>Fantasy

This makes sense. Although I think we can split Realistic into
modern-day and Historical. Within each of these we can play
particular styles such as Adventure, Comedy, Horror, Detection,
etc. No matter, Horror games have close ties and often common
themes.

I'm not sure that WoD is horror - because I think the
characteristic of horror is that the players are supposed to get
scared; not very likely in a WoD game.

>Just about everything I can think of will fit in those categories,
>at least if you smoosh it up right. There are no hard and sure
>boundaries between what's realistic and what's science fiction,
>or what's science fiction and what's fantasy, or whatever, but
>these three categories strike me as ones that most people would
>be willing to agree fit the "I know it when I see it" test.
>That doesn't mean there wouldn't be a LOT of disagreement
>over where exactly a given sub-genre fits, of course, but
>most people will be able to at least come up with their own
>lists pretty easily, and that can serve as a basis for comparison.
>
>However, if you want to list all the big genres and/or
>sub-genres without worrying about greater classification,
>the only one I can think of that you missed was post-
>apocalyptic.

Maybe I din't notice it because I don't tend to play it; nor any
kind of Sci-Fi.

> It's big enough (or was, at least) to
>merit its own entry even though it's just a specialization
>of either Science Fiction or Fantasy, depending on how
>hard you like your science.
>
>Ooh, Western is another good one that's not as popular
>today as it has been in the past. It's a subcategory
>of Historical, obviously, but big enough to deserve a
>separate mention.

Of course. Western - Heroic fantasy without magic.

>You might also throw humorous in there, though it's a
>modifier more than a genre unto itself. And if we are
>including modifiers, there are also the many games that
>pride themselves on being very simple. I'm thinking of
>stuff like Risus or TWERPS, here. Like the humorous
>games, they can be of any or all genres, but I think
>there are enough of them that they deserve mention in
>some way.
>
>Another important modifier is the cross-genre mix.
>Games like GURPS and Hero allow you to mix and match
>as you wish, of course, but games like Shadowrun and
>Deadlands and others that of course I'm blanking on
>right now have a single setting that deliberately
>incorporates two or more usually separate genres.
>
>And then there are games based on books, movies, TV shows,
>whatever. Some, like GURPS The Prisoner, are fun little
>one-offs that fans enjoy but don't make much impact on
>the world of gaming as a whole. Others, like Marvel or
>DC Superheroes, Call of Cthulhu and Star Wars, are very
>big deals and have an existence and popularity that
>isn't solely dependent on the original property they're
>based on.
>
>So. Genre modifiers. Here's my list:
>
>Humorous
>Simple/Easy
>Mixed Genre
>Licensed Property
>
>>If you can add more to this list or come up with a sensible
>>classification that removes some of the overlap - that would
>>really be appreciated.
>
>If you're at all interested in listing the major sub-genres,
>there's going to be lots of overlap. And we could argue for
>a long time about which sub-genres deserve their own mention
>and which should just be assumed to fit under the larger
>categories. Cyberpunk is pretty obviously part of the
>science fiction genre, for example (crossed with fantasy
>for things like Shadowrun) but can Horror be seen as part
>of the fantasy genre? I think so, at least if we're using
>a broad definition of fantasy, but Horror is definitely
>a big enough genre to deserve its own listing.
>
>>6. genre - see above
>
>>If you also want to suggest what the key classes are (in 1 - 6)
>>- that would be a big help too me as well.
>
>Key examples, you mean? I'll give it a shot, but in another
>post since this one is getting way too long.
>
>Pete

Thanks for all that. I'll read it again later, too.
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 1:59:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.misc (More info?)

"Oberon" <oberon@solstice.com> wrote:
> High Fantasy
> Low Fantasy

I don't get the difference between high and low fantasy.


--
David Meadows
"Welcome to the 21st century, Harry." -- Harry, Heroes #25
Heroes: the comic book www.heroes.force9.co.uk/scripts
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 1:59:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.misc (More info?)

This is all IMO.

High Fantasy has big magic and big events where the players could be
changing the world and dealing with or becoming gods.

Low Fantasy is closer to real medieval life. If magic exist it is more in
the background and part of legend.

Mitch



"David Meadows" <david@no.spam.here.uk> wrote in message
news:42b48c84$0$2396$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader02.plus.net...
> "Oberon" <oberon@solstice.com> wrote:
>> High Fantasy
>> Low Fantasy
>
> I don't get the difference between high and low fantasy.
>
>
> --
> David Meadows
> "Welcome to the 21st century, Harry." -- Harry, Heroes #25
> Heroes: the comic book www.heroes.force9.co.uk/scripts
>
>
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 4:35:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.misc (More info?)

Mitch Williams wrote:

> This is all IMO.
>
> High Fantasy has big magic and big events where the players could be
> changing the world and dealing with or becoming gods.
>
> Low Fantasy is closer to real medieval life. If magic exist it is more in
> the background and part of legend.

Another way of looking at it is that in high fantasy, PCs have a sort
of script immunity - they only die if they do something really stupid
or if it's in a particularly heroic way which advances the plot.

In high fantasy, you know the PCs are going to win unless they do
something really stupid. This applies to many Hollywood action films.

In low fantasy, the PCs will only win if they're clever, careful and
lucky. This is more common in a horror genre.


--
Be seeing you, ---------------------------
Sam. http://www.glendale.org.uk/
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 4:59:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.misc (More info?)

and you may be starting to confuse genre with subgenre.

genre = SF

subgenre = cyberpunk, new wave sf, space opera
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 11:54:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.misc (More info?)

In article <1495b1l88gk9f8mvkaep8dlnsfuk392mei@4ax.com>,
Oberon <oberon ATsolstice DOT com> wrote:
>RPG Genres - How many are there are which are the key ones
>
>If someone asked you which genres you played and which were the
>most important genres - how would you reply. So far I have:

I think you should have D&D and a distinct Genre. The effect the
rules have on play leaves a distinct flavour Imagine your favorate
novel rewritten in the style of a D&D game (played straight).

--
Michael
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NPC rights activist | Nameless Abominations are people too.
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 3:00:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.misc (More info?)

On Sun, 19 Jun 2005, Samuel Penn wrote:

> Mitch Williams wrote:
>
>
> Another way of looking at it is that in high fantasy, PCs have a sort
> of script immunity - they only die if they do something really stupid
> or if it's in a particularly heroic way which advances the plot.
>
> In high fantasy, you know the PCs are going to win unless they do
> something really stupid. This applies to many Hollywood action films.

So, this is like D&D, where "Adventurer" automatically means you are about
ten times as good as "joe villager"

> In low fantasy, the PCs will only win if they're clever, careful and
> lucky. This is more common in a horror genre.

And this is like Rolemaster, where a level one Adventurer is about on the
level of a level one Shopkeeper, or Metalsmith... i.e. inexperienced and
likely to be fleeced in the bargain.
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 7:13:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.misc (More info?)

Lena B Katz <lbk@andrew.cmu.edu> wrote in
news:p ine.GSO.4.60-041.0506201056470.936@unix5.andrew.cmu.edu:

> On Sun, 19 Jun 2005, Samuel Penn wrote:
>
>> Mitch Williams wrote:
>>
>>
>> Another way of looking at it is that in high fantasy, PCs have a
>> sort of script immunity - they only die if they do something
>> really stupid or if it's in a particularly heroic way which
>> advances the plot.
>>
>> In high fantasy, you know the PCs are going to win unless they do
>> something really stupid. This applies to many Hollywood action
>> films.
>
> So, this is like D&D, where "Adventurer" automatically means you
> are about ten times as good as "joe villager"
>

No, Samuel has it wrong. In high fantasy the heroes do NOT
automatically succeed, any more than in any other literature style.

--
Marc

Rommie : We are not the droids you are looking for
Doyle : What was that ?
Rommie : I don't know, but it didn't work !
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 9:56:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.misc (More info?)

Marc L. wrote:

> Lena B Katz <lbk@andrew.cmu.edu> wrote in
> news:p ine.GSO.4.60-041.0506201056470.936@unix5.andrew.cmu.edu:
>
>> On Sun, 19 Jun 2005, Samuel Penn wrote:
>>
>>> Mitch Williams wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>> Another way of looking at it is that in high fantasy, PCs have a
>>> sort of script immunity - they only die if they do something
>>> really stupid or if it's in a particularly heroic way which
>>> advances the plot.
>>>
>>> In high fantasy, you know the PCs are going to win unless they do
>>> something really stupid. This applies to many Hollywood action
>>> films.
>>
>> So, this is like D&D, where "Adventurer" automatically means you
>> are about ten times as good as "joe villager"
>>
>
> No, Samuel has it wrong. In high fantasy the heroes do NOT
> automatically succeed,

I didn't say automatically - but I'd say there is a definite assumption
that they will. If they don't, it's generally a heroic failure, often
with some meaning, while fighting the big bad guy.

In high fantasy, the hero doesn't die by stepping on some random land
mine during some minor side adventure. They might die at the end of a
big climatic battle however.

What would be your definition of high fantasy?
What would be your label for what I'm describing?

Can you name any examples of stories (film/literature) which you'd
consider high fantasy, where the heroes fail?

> any more than in any other literature style.

I'd say heroes are less likely to succeed in a horror setting than
in most others, at least in RPGs. In films, there's often success for
one or two heroes, but everyone else dies (and it's not clear from
the start who is going to survive).

--
Be seeing you, ---------------------------
Sam. http://www.glendale.org.uk/
Anonymous
June 21, 2005 5:49:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.misc (More info?)

Samuel Penn <sam@bifrost.demon.co.uk> wrote:
>Marc L. wrote:

>What would be your definition of high fantasy?
>What would be your label for what I'm describing?

>Can you name any examples of stories (film/literature) which you'd
>consider high fantasy, where the heroes fail?

I'd say the power level and the epic nature of the stories are
the most important elements of high fantasy. Not all high
fantasy characters are super-powerful, and not all their
adventures are epic, but that's what I think of as the
defining elements of the genre. I agree that the characters
generally don't die for random or stupid reasons, too - if
they're going to die, it's generally important to the story.

>> any more than in any other literature style.

>I'd say heroes are less likely to succeed in a horror setting than
>in most others, at least in RPGs. In films, there's often success for
>one or two heroes, but everyone else dies (and it's not clear from
>the start who is going to survive).

I'd modify that slightly to include the fact that you often
know from the very start of the movie that certain characters are
going to live or die. Some characters in some movies you just
know are going to make it through alive. It's not always the
main characters, but usually it is. You can generally bet that
any young kids in the movie will make it, too. There are movies
out there that go ahead and kill the characters you were sure
were going to live, but in my experience that seems like a
deliberate turn against the rule - "We'll set it up to make
it look like this is one of those characters who never gets
killed, and then kill 'em for the shock value" - rather than
a true "Anyone can die at any moment" rule like Joe Bob Briggs
always trumpeted. I don't know if that makes any sense, but
it's how I see most horror flicks.

The reverse holds true, too, of course. There are some
characters you just KNOW are going to die, and some movies
let those characters live just to shake things up a bit.
Sadly, it's often a character that's so annoying you
really, really, really wish they'd killed the bastard.

Pete
Anonymous
June 26, 2005 7:17:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.misc (More info?)

Oberon <oberon@solstice.com> wrote:
> On 17 Jun 2005 12:05:54 GMT, mcv <mcvmcv@xs4all.nl> wrote:
>
>>Oberon <oberon@solstice.com> wrote:
>>> RPG Genres - How many are there are which are the key ones
>>>
>>> If someone asked you which genres you played and which were the
>>> most important genres - how would you reply. So far I have:
>>>
>>> Any
>>> Anime
>>> Cartoon
>>> Cyberpunk
>>> Detective
>>> Historical
>>> Horror
>>> Fantasy
>>> High Fantasy
>>> Low Fantasy
>>> Present Day
>>> Science Fiction
>>> Superheroes
>>> WoD
>>
>>Steampunk
>>Illuminated
>>Espionage
>
> OK I'm familiar with Steampunk and Espionage but I don't even
> know what Illuminated is. Does Illuminated really have an entire
> genre to itself? Is it the SJ game with the Triangle I've never
> played?

The genre is indeed pretty popular with SJG. Apart from their Illuminati
card games they also have GURPS Illuminati with lots of suggestions on
how to make any campaign Illuminated. The basic idea is that there's a
Grand Conspiracy that secretly controls the world (or tries to). A whole
new truth behind the reality you thought you knew. Hence lots of
investigations and weirdness. Think X-files, but more so, although
it can also look totally different.

>>What kind of genre is "Any"? Anything that doesn't fit in any of the
>>other categories?
>
> Yes. Anything. I should've edited it out. I doesn't count.
>
> Thinking about it Espionage, Horror, Detective and maybe plain
> Adventure could take place in a Steampunk, Supers or Fantasy
> setting - so maybe there's are really two sub-divisions here:
> Setting and Genre?

I think so, yes.


mcv.
Anonymous
June 26, 2005 7:20:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.misc (More info?)

Mitch Williams <m_a_w@bellsouth.net> wrote:
> This is all IMO.
>
> High Fantasy has big magic and big events where the players could be
> changing the world and dealing with or becoming gods.
>
> Low Fantasy is closer to real medieval life. If magic exist it is more in
> the background and part of legend.

This distinction doesn't exist just in fantasy. In SF, Superheroes, or
anything else really, you can also have the distinction between epic or
larger than life, and grim & gritty.


mcv.
Anonymous
July 14, 2005 1:33:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.misc (More info?)

On Fri, 17 Jun 2005 10:35:26 GMT, Oberon <oberon@solstice.com> wrote:

>RPG Genres - How many are there are which are the key ones
>
>If someone asked you which genres you played and which were the
>most important genres - how would you reply. So far I have:
>
>Any
>Anime
>Cartoon
>Cyberpunk
>Detective
>Historical
>Horror
>Fantasy
>High Fantasy
>Low Fantasy
>Present Day
>Science Fiction
>Superheroes
>WoD

After some consideration of the replies I've had I've decided that
it's pointless to classify games like this. There are two many games
crossing over between different sub genres, etc.

As people commentated. Style of play is important: Campaign,
Storytelling, etc. Science Fiction is split into many sub-genres:
Space Opera, Cyberpunk, Realistic, Post Apocalyptic, etc. All genres
may have gritty realism, an operatic style or a mixture of both.
!