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Retail XP Pro - Beware of Rebate Requirements

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Anonymous
July 1, 2005 8:17:40 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

I recently purchased a retail copy of XP Pro at a major computer retail
store because it was offered with a substantial rebate.

When I got around to filling out the rebate form, I noticed that one of the
requirements was that you include the original UPC code (no copies accepted)
from the retail box. This is a normal requirement for many rebates.

The problem is, that with the retail-boxed version of Microsoft Windows, the
UPC sticker on the box is also the Certificate of Authenticity! In other
words, in order to be eligible for the rebate, I was being required to
relinquish my COA.! I think that is totally unfair, especially considering
that another requirement is the cash register receipt, which is
more-than-adequate proof of purchase due to the fact that the details of the
purchase are also stored in their database. Any subsequent returns of the
product are also linked to the original data, thus preventing someone from
claiming a rebate on a returned product.

Well, I raised hell with the retailer, and they finally agreed to honor the
rebate if I provided a photocopy of the COA. I wonder what the company
does with all the COAs they receive from customers who don't realize they
are giving away their proof of authenticity.

Also, I wonder if Microsoft is aware of this practice. Come to think of it,
I suppose it would actually be to their benefit to have all those copies of
XP Pro stripped of their COAs. For one thing, it's a lot harder to sell XP
on eBay without a COA. I know I wouldn't take a chance buying a
supposedly-legitimate, used, retail copy of XP without it.

So, if you find yourself in this situation, contact the retailer and read
'em the riot act.

M.B.
Anonymous
July 1, 2005 8:17:41 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Marianne;
Do not confuse the sticker on the box that says Certificate Of Authenticity
with the Product Key on the CD envelope.
The COA on the box serves no purpose after purchase and you lose nothing if
you do not keep it.

--
Jupiter Jones [MVP]
http://www3.telus.net/dandemar
http://www.dts-l.org


"Marianne B." <anonymous@foobar.com> wrote in message
news:%230w0%23ThfFHA.3584@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>I recently purchased a retail copy of XP Pro at a major computer retail
> store because it was offered with a substantial rebate.
>
> When I got around to filling out the rebate form, I noticed that one of
> the
> requirements was that you include the original UPC code (no copies
> accepted)
> from the retail box. This is a normal requirement for many rebates.
>
> The problem is, that with the retail-boxed version of Microsoft Windows,
> the
> UPC sticker on the box is also the Certificate of Authenticity! In other
> words, in order to be eligible for the rebate, I was being required to
> relinquish my COA.! I think that is totally unfair, especially
> considering
> that another requirement is the cash register receipt, which is
> more-than-adequate proof of purchase due to the fact that the details of
> the
> purchase are also stored in their database. Any subsequent returns of the
> product are also linked to the original data, thus preventing someone from
> claiming a rebate on a returned product.
>
> Well, I raised hell with the retailer, and they finally agreed to honor
> the
> rebate if I provided a photocopy of the COA. I wonder what the company
> does with all the COAs they receive from customers who don't realize they
> are giving away their proof of authenticity.
>
> Also, I wonder if Microsoft is aware of this practice. Come to think of
> it,
> I suppose it would actually be to their benefit to have all those copies
> of
> XP Pro stripped of their COAs. For one thing, it's a lot harder to sell
> XP
> on eBay without a COA. I know I wouldn't take a chance buying a
> supposedly-legitimate, used, retail copy of XP without it.
>
> So, if you find yourself in this situation, contact the retailer and read
> 'em the riot act.
>
> M.B.
Anonymous
July 1, 2005 9:25:13 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Thanks for the reply.

I understand the difference. However, it is my understanding that the COA
is an intrinsic part of the license to the software. Correct me if I am
wrong, but I believe that one of Microsoft's requirements for resale of the
software is that the seller provide the buyer with the original COA.

If the software is sold to another party, it is the party in possession of
the COA that has true possession of the license. Someone could sell a
disk and provide the Product Key, but keep the COA and continue to use
the key. If an activation battle ensued, I believe the holder of the COA
would win unless, of course, the buyer could prove fraud on the part of
the seller.

M.B.

"Jupiter Jones [MVP]" <jones_jupiter@hotnomail.com> wrote in message
news:ue5CgdhfFHA.3448@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> Marianne;
> Do not confuse the sticker on the box that says Certificate Of
> Authenticity with the Product Key on the CD envelope.
> The COA on the box serves no purpose after purchase and you lose nothing
> if you do not keep it.
>
> --
> Jupiter Jones [MVP]
> http://www3.telus.net/dandemar
> http://www.dts-l.org
>
>
> "Marianne B." <anonymous@foobar.com> wrote in message
> news:%230w0%23ThfFHA.3584@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > I recently purchased a retail copy of XP Pro at a major computer
> > retail store because it was offered with a substantial rebate.
> >
> > When I got around to filling out the rebate form, I noticed that one of
> > the requirements was that you include the original UPC code (no
> > copies accepted) from the retail box. This is a normal requirement
> > for many rebates.
> >
> > The problem is, that with the retail-boxed version of Microsoft Windows,
> > the UPC sticker on the box is also the Certificate of Authenticity! In
> > other words, in order to be eligible for the rebate, I was being
> > required to relinquish my COA.! I think that is totally unfair,
> > especially considering that another requirement is the cash register
> > receipt, which is more-than-adequate proof of purchase due to the fact
> > that the details of the purchase are also stored in their database. Any
> > subsequent returns of the product are also linked to the original data,
> > thus preventing someone from claiming a rebate on a returned product.
> >
> > Well, I raised hell with the retailer, and they finally agreed to honor
> > the rebate if I provided a photocopy of the COA. I wonder what the
> > company does with all the COAs they receive from customers who
> > don't realize they are giving away their proof of authenticity.
> >
> > Also, I wonder if Microsoft is aware of this practice. Come to think of
> > it, I suppose it would actually be to their benefit to have all those
> > copies of XP Pro stripped of their COAs. For one thing, it's a lot
> > harder to sell XP on eBay without a COA. I know I wouldn't take a
> > chance buying a supposedly-legitimate, used, retail copy of XP without
> > it.
> >
> > So, if you find yourself in this situation, contact the retailer and
> > read 'em the riot act.
> >
> > M.B.
>
Related resources
Anonymous
July 1, 2005 11:23:21 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Please tell what store.


--
The people think the Constitution protects their rights;
But government sees it as an obstacle to be overcome.
some support
http://www.usdoj.gov/olc/secondamendment2.htm



"Marianne B." <anonymous@foobar.com> wrote in message
news:%230w0%23ThfFHA.3584@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
|I recently purchased a retail copy of XP Pro at a major
computer retail
| store because it was offered with a substantial rebate.
|
| When I got around to filling out the rebate form, I
noticed that one of the
| requirements was that you include the original UPC code
(no copies accepted)
| from the retail box. This is a normal requirement for
many rebates.
|
| The problem is, that with the retail-boxed version of
Microsoft Windows, the
| UPC sticker on the box is also the Certificate of
Authenticity! In other
| words, in order to be eligible for the rebate, I was being
required to
| relinquish my COA.! I think that is totally unfair,
especially considering
| that another requirement is the cash register receipt,
which is
| more-than-adequate proof of purchase due to the fact that
the details of the
| purchase are also stored in their database. Any
subsequent returns of the
| product are also linked to the original data, thus
preventing someone from
| claiming a rebate on a returned product.
|
| Well, I raised hell with the retailer, and they finally
agreed to honor the
| rebate if I provided a photocopy of the COA. I wonder
what the company
| does with all the COAs they receive from customers who
don't realize they
| are giving away their proof of authenticity.
|
| Also, I wonder if Microsoft is aware of this practice.
Come to think of it,
| I suppose it would actually be to their benefit to have
all those copies of
| XP Pro stripped of their COAs. For one thing, it's a lot
harder to sell XP
| on eBay without a COA. I know I wouldn't take a chance
buying a
| supposedly-legitimate, used, retail copy of XP without it.
|
| So, if you find yourself in this situation, contact the
retailer and read
| 'em the riot act.
|
| M.B.
|
|
|
Anonymous
July 1, 2005 1:28:25 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

That is some really paranoid ranting. I think that the problem lies in your
mind and not in the system. I recommend some hot tea and a chill pill.

De-complexify your existence by ignoring the insignificant.

No offense. I was just observing.

"Marianne B." <anonymous@foobar.com> wrote in message
news:o FMGB5hfFHA.576@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Thanks for the reply.
>
> I understand the difference. However, it is my understanding that the COA
> is an intrinsic part of the license to the software. Correct me if I am
> wrong, but I believe that one of Microsoft's requirements for resale of
the
> software is that the seller provide the buyer with the original COA.
>
> If the software is sold to another party, it is the party in possession of
> the COA that has true possession of the license. Someone could sell a
> disk and provide the Product Key, but keep the COA and continue to use
> the key. If an activation battle ensued, I believe the holder of the COA
> would win unless, of course, the buyer could prove fraud on the part of
> the seller.
>
> M.B.
>
> "Jupiter Jones [MVP]" <jones_jupiter@hotnomail.com> wrote in message
> news:ue5CgdhfFHA.3448@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> > Marianne;
> > Do not confuse the sticker on the box that says Certificate Of
> > Authenticity with the Product Key on the CD envelope.
> > The COA on the box serves no purpose after purchase and you lose nothing
> > if you do not keep it.
> >
> > --
> > Jupiter Jones [MVP]
> > http://www3.telus.net/dandemar
> > http://www.dts-l.org
> >
> >
> > "Marianne B." <anonymous@foobar.com> wrote in message
> > news:%230w0%23ThfFHA.3584@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > > I recently purchased a retail copy of XP Pro at a major computer
> > > retail store because it was offered with a substantial rebate.
> > >
> > > When I got around to filling out the rebate form, I noticed that one
of
> > > the requirements was that you include the original UPC code (no
> > > copies accepted) from the retail box. This is a normal requirement
> > > for many rebates.
> > >
> > > The problem is, that with the retail-boxed version of Microsoft
Windows,
> > > the UPC sticker on the box is also the Certificate of Authenticity!
In
> > > other words, in order to be eligible for the rebate, I was being
> > > required to relinquish my COA.! I think that is totally unfair,
> > > especially considering that another requirement is the cash register
> > > receipt, which is more-than-adequate proof of purchase due to the fact
> > > that the details of the purchase are also stored in their database.
Any
> > > subsequent returns of the product are also linked to the original
data,
> > > thus preventing someone from claiming a rebate on a returned product.
> > >
> > > Well, I raised hell with the retailer, and they finally agreed to
honor
> > > the rebate if I provided a photocopy of the COA. I wonder what the
> > > company does with all the COAs they receive from customers who
> > > don't realize they are giving away their proof of authenticity.
> > >
> > > Also, I wonder if Microsoft is aware of this practice. Come to think
of
> > > it, I suppose it would actually be to their benefit to have all those
> > > copies of XP Pro stripped of their COAs. For one thing, it's a lot
> > > harder to sell XP on eBay without a COA. I know I wouldn't take a
> > > chance buying a supposedly-legitimate, used, retail copy of XP without
> > > it.
> > >
> > > So, if you find yourself in this situation, contact the retailer and
> > > read 'em the riot act.
> > >
> > > M.B.
> >
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
July 1, 2005 2:07:38 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Marianne B. is right to be upset about the way rebates are
offered. The hoops required to "qualify" for the rebate,
which is often a prime reason for the choice of the purchase
item and location, is overly complex. You have to print
copies of the correct label, cut the box up, which makes
storing the purchased software less secure if you want to
save the box, and then you must trust that the half dozen
bits and piece you send it will be the correct bits and the
rebate will be sent. They don't write you back and ask for
the "other cash register receipt" they just trash can the
whole package.
Some companies (BestBuy) print two cash register receipts, a
primary and a rebate copy. OFFICE MAX has recently changed
their procedure, you formerly had to use a booklet and find
the special rebate form.

In the case of MS, they should have a UPC label on the box
and the COA which is intended to be attached to the
computer. The PK can be retained in any form, since you
type it in when required. I write my PKs on the CD with a
safe marker.


--
The people think the Constitution protects their rights;
But government sees it as an obstacle to be overcome.
some support
http://www.usdoj.gov/olc/secondamendment2.htm



"news.microsoft.com" <derekthestud@hotmail.com> wrote in
message news:umkTlkkfFHA.1148@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
| That is some really paranoid ranting. I think that the
problem lies in your
| mind and not in the system. I recommend some hot tea and a
chill pill.
|
| De-complexify your existence by ignoring the
insignificant.
|
| No offense. I was just observing.
|
| "Marianne B." <anonymous@foobar.com> wrote in message
| news:o FMGB5hfFHA.576@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
| > Thanks for the reply.
| >
| > I understand the difference. However, it is my
understanding that the COA
| > is an intrinsic part of the license to the software.
Correct me if I am
| > wrong, but I believe that one of Microsoft's
requirements for resale of
| the
| > software is that the seller provide the buyer with the
original COA.
| >
| > If the software is sold to another party, it is the
party in possession of
| > the COA that has true possession of the license.
Someone could sell a
| > disk and provide the Product Key, but keep the COA and
continue to use
| > the key. If an activation battle ensued, I believe the
holder of the COA
| > would win unless, of course, the buyer could prove fraud
on the part of
| > the seller.
| >
| > M.B.
| >
| > "Jupiter Jones [MVP]" <jones_jupiter@hotnomail.com>
wrote in message
| > news:ue5CgdhfFHA.3448@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
| > > Marianne;
| > > Do not confuse the sticker on the box that says
Certificate Of
| > > Authenticity with the Product Key on the CD envelope.
| > > The COA on the box serves no purpose after purchase
and you lose nothing
| > > if you do not keep it.
| > >
| > > --
| > > Jupiter Jones [MVP]
| > > http://www3.telus.net/dandemar
| > > http://www.dts-l.org
| > >
| > >
| > > "Marianne B." <anonymous@foobar.com> wrote in message
| > > news:%230w0%23ThfFHA.3584@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
| > > > I recently purchased a retail copy of XP Pro at a
major computer
| > > > retail store because it was offered with a
substantial rebate.
| > > >
| > > > When I got around to filling out the rebate form, I
noticed that one
| of
| > > > the requirements was that you include the original
UPC code (no
| > > > copies accepted) from the retail box. This is a
normal requirement
| > > > for many rebates.
| > > >
| > > > The problem is, that with the retail-boxed version
of Microsoft
| Windows,
| > > > the UPC sticker on the box is also the Certificate
of Authenticity!
| In
| > > > other words, in order to be eligible for the
rebate, I was being
| > > > required to relinquish my COA.! I think that is
totally unfair,
| > > > especially considering that another requirement is
the cash register
| > > > receipt, which is more-than-adequate proof of
purchase due to the fact
| > > > that the details of the purchase are also stored in
their database.
| Any
| > > > subsequent returns of the product are also linked to
the original
| data,
| > > > thus preventing someone from claiming a rebate on a
returned product.
| > > >
| > > > Well, I raised hell with the retailer, and they
finally agreed to
| honor
| > > > the rebate if I provided a photocopy of the COA. I
wonder what the
| > > > company does with all the COAs they receive from
customers who
| > > > don't realize they are giving away their proof of
authenticity.
| > > >
| > > > Also, I wonder if Microsoft is aware of this
practice. Come to think
| of
| > > > it, I suppose it would actually be to their benefit
to have all those
| > > > copies of XP Pro stripped of their COAs. For one
thing, it's a lot
| > > > harder to sell XP on eBay without a COA. I know I
wouldn't take a
| > > > chance buying a supposedly-legitimate, used, retail
copy of XP without
| > > > it.
| > > >
| > > > So, if you find yourself in this situation, contact
the retailer and
| > > > read 'em the riot act.
| > > >
| > > > M.B.
| > >
| >
| >
| >
| >
| >
| >
| >
| >
| >
| >
| >
| >
| >
| >
| >
| >
| >
| >
| >
| >
| >
|
|
Anonymous
July 1, 2005 9:24:50 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

I didn't mention the name in my post because they did finally
honor the rebate without my having to supply the original COA.
But, since you asked, it's CompUSA. They recently got a big
judgment against them for rebate-related problems, so I think
they're probably being extra sensitive to complaints. OTOH, I
did notice that they haven't changed the requirement on
subsequent XP Pro rebate offers.

M.B.

"Jim Macklin" <p51mustang[threeX12]@xxxhotmail.calm> wrote in message
news:o x4zDfjfFHA.3656@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Please tell what store.
>
> "Marianne B." <anonymous@foobar.com> wrote in message
> news:%230w0%23ThfFHA.3584@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> | I recently purchased a retail copy of XP Pro at a major
> | computer retail
> | store because it was offered with a substantial rebate.
> |
> | When I got around to filling out the rebate form, I
> | noticed that one of the
> | requirements was that you include the original UPC code
> | (no copies accepted)
> | from the retail box. This is a normal requirement for
> | many rebates.
> |
> | The problem is, that with the retail-boxed version of
> | Microsoft Windows, the
> | UPC sticker on the box is also the Certificate of
> | Authenticity! In other
> | words, in order to be eligible for the rebate, I was being
> | required to
> | relinquish my COA.! I think that is totally unfair,
> | especially considering
> | that another requirement is the cash register receipt,
> | which is
> | more-than-adequate proof of purchase due to the fact that
> | the details of the
> | purchase are also stored in their database. Any
> | subsequent returns of the
> | product are also linked to the original data, thus
> | preventing someone from
> | claiming a rebate on a returned product.
> |
> | Well, I raised hell with the retailer, and they finally
> | agreed to honor the
> | rebate if I provided a photocopy of the COA. I wonder
> | what the company
> | does with all the COAs they receive from customers who
> | don't realize they
> | are giving away their proof of authenticity.
> |
> | Also, I wonder if Microsoft is aware of this practice.
> | Come to think of it,
> | I suppose it would actually be to their benefit to have
> | all those copies of
> | XP Pro stripped of their COAs. For one thing, it's a lot
> | harder to sell XP
> | on eBay without a COA. I know I wouldn't take a chance
> | buying a
> | supposedly-legitimate, used, retail copy of XP without it.
> |
> | So, if you find yourself in this situation, contact the
> | retailer and read 'em the riot act.
> |
> | M.B.
> |
>
Anonymous
July 1, 2005 9:24:51 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Thanks, I have purchased things from CompUSA before and
their rebate system is pretty difficult. Rebates should be
easy.

Thanks again. I will be sure to check and complain BEFORE a
purchase since that may be the best way to get a change
done, when my cash is not yet in their hands.


--
The people think the Constitution protects their rights;
But government sees it as an obstacle to be overcome.
some support
http://www.usdoj.gov/olc/secondamendment2.htm



"Marianne B." <anonymous@foobar.com> wrote in message
news:o l7xBLofFHA.576@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
|I didn't mention the name in my post because they did
finally
| honor the rebate without my having to supply the original
COA.
| But, since you asked, it's CompUSA. They recently got a
big
| judgment against them for rebate-related problems, so I
think
| they're probably being extra sensitive to complaints.
OTOH, I
| did notice that they haven't changed the requirement on
| subsequent XP Pro rebate offers.
|
| M.B.
|
| "Jim Macklin" <p51mustang[threeX12]@xxxhotmail.calm> wrote
in message
| news:o x4zDfjfFHA.3656@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
| > Please tell what store.
| >
| > "Marianne B." <anonymous@foobar.com> wrote in message
| > news:%230w0%23ThfFHA.3584@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
| > | I recently purchased a retail copy of XP Pro at a
major
| > | computer retail
| > | store because it was offered with a substantial
rebate.
| > |
| > | When I got around to filling out the rebate form, I
| > | noticed that one of the
| > | requirements was that you include the original UPC
code
| > | (no copies accepted)
| > | from the retail box. This is a normal requirement for
| > | many rebates.
| > |
| > | The problem is, that with the retail-boxed version of
| > | Microsoft Windows, the
| > | UPC sticker on the box is also the Certificate of
| > | Authenticity! In other
| > | words, in order to be eligible for the rebate, I was
being
| > | required to
| > | relinquish my COA.! I think that is totally unfair,
| > | especially considering
| > | that another requirement is the cash register receipt,
| > | which is
| > | more-than-adequate proof of purchase due to the fact
that
| > | the details of the
| > | purchase are also stored in their database. Any
| > | subsequent returns of the
| > | product are also linked to the original data, thus
| > | preventing someone from
| > | claiming a rebate on a returned product.
| > |
| > | Well, I raised hell with the retailer, and they
finally
| > | agreed to honor the
| > | rebate if I provided a photocopy of the COA. I wonder
| > | what the company
| > | does with all the COAs they receive from customers who
| > | don't realize they
| > | are giving away their proof of authenticity.
| > |
| > | Also, I wonder if Microsoft is aware of this practice.
| > | Come to think of it,
| > | I suppose it would actually be to their benefit to
have
| > | all those copies of
| > | XP Pro stripped of their COAs. For one thing, it's a
lot
| > | harder to sell XP
| > | on eBay without a COA. I know I wouldn't take a
chance
| > | buying a
| > | supposedly-legitimate, used, retail copy of XP without
it.
| > |
| > | So, if you find yourself in this situation, contact
the
| > | retailer and read 'em the riot act.
| > |
| > | M.B.
| > |
| >
|
|
|
!