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Viewsonic VP920b

Last response: in Computer Peripherals
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December 28, 2006 3:02:18 PM

Might anyone here know if the Viewsonic VP920b is any good? I currently have a VP930b, which I need to return as it hurts my eyes (I believe it's the response time, every moving object is blurry, and the entire screen seems somehow... glittery? I can't think of the right term, as I've never seen this before).

Is the VP920b basically the same as the VP930b, only faster? Does its presence in the "professional" series mean that, unlike most gaming monitors, it's as well-suited for photo editing and the like as Viewsonic claims? So far, I can't find any good information on this monitor.

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a b C Monitor
December 28, 2006 6:08:53 PM

Seems like you are one of the individuals who is able to spot the many problems with LCD monitors. In other threads in this section, I outlined many of the image quality issues with LCD monitors -- many of them go unmentioned by most people; some issues take a person who is very critical of display quality to spot.

the glittery effect... would you say that the following describes what you mean? When looking at what should be a solid color, you instead see a little bit of blotchiness to the color making it look like the screen has dust on it, when it does not. In other words, the screen is unable to truly reproduce a purse solid color. If this describes what you are talking about, then the problem is the matte finish that is present on most non-laptop LCD monitors. There are LCDs with a shiny finish to them (that does not have this problem), however, these monitors reflect things very easily, and as you may or may not know, reflections are bad on your eyes/can give you a headache. Unfortunately, no LCD monitor has a finish like the quality CRTs do -- you know.... the anti-glare coatings present on quality CRTs that get rid of glare and still produce a clear picture.
Alternatively, and I don't know if this would work, but you could get a shiny screen LCD, and then buy an anti-reflection screen to go over the LCD monitor (they make them for LCDs too). I'm not sure if this method works or if the anti-reflection screens use the same poor quality anti-reflection method used on most LCDs.

response time -- assuming that the VP930b is the same as the VP930s, then the VP930s is in the lower range of response times -- not the best, but not bad: http://www.tomshardware.com/2005/11/17/viewsonic_vp930_...

If you truly think the issue is response time, then I suggest trying a different monitor:

TN based NEC 90GX2
AS-IPS based NEC 20WGX2
S-IPS based MFM-HT205

These all have the shiny screen. In addition, the response times are pretty low (almost in the range of the fastest LCD monitors available like the VX922). If you still find response time an issue, which is quite likely, then that means you'll need to go back to a CRT. Buying one from craigslist.com or a refurbished one are two options.

Quote:
Does its presence in the "professional" series mean that, unlike most gaming monitors, it's as well-suited for photo editing and the like as Viewsonic claims?
Who knows. The only way to tell is to look at actual testing of response times.
[code:1:4194e25011]So far, I can't find any good information on this monitor.[/code:1:4194e25011] Indeed. Nearly every bit of information you find on the box or listed in specs somewhere on the web is is 100% wrong or an outright lie. The information manufacturers provide about LCD monitors is pretty worthless for making a very accurate purchasing decision. Your best choice is to find out the panel type to get an idea of picture quality and then look for any sites that have tested response times to get an idea of the speed of the panel.
December 28, 2006 6:26:35 PM

Yes, that describes what I'm seeing. I'd been scratching my head over this, and the matte finish just hadn't occurred to me as a possible source of the problem. It makes everything on the screen seem to warp and swim very slightly in my peripheral vision, and it's giving me quite an astonishing headache.

I'm also having a devil of a time adjusting brightness, contrast, and color values. It seems to have two ranges: too dim and MY EYES ARE BURNING.

I agree absolutely about the problems with LCD monitors. This much is nothing new to me. Unfortunately, I can't seem to escape them. There simply are no trustworthy merchants who sell reliable used CRTs where I live. As no one is making good CRTs these days, that means I'm stuck with an LCD.

I suppose the only thing to do is begin ordering, testing, and returning LCDs until every retail store and online merchant on the planet bans me. :x
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a b C Monitor
December 28, 2006 11:16:04 PM

Try out one of the latter two that I mentioned. If they don't fit what you need, then likely nothing will.
December 29, 2006 12:23:40 AM

Will do, thanks. I truly appreciate the help.

Assuming Wikipedia has accurate information, the AS-IPS panel sounds like my best bet. It also said that these are most often used in larger displays. If I have problems with the way high-resolution LCDs turn everything exceedingly tiny, is there some solution of which I should be aware?
a b C Monitor
December 29, 2006 12:54:36 AM

Quote:
Will do, thanks. I truly appreciate the help.

Assuming Wikipedia has accurate information, the AS-IPS panel sounds like my best bet. It also said that these are most often used in larger displays. If I have problems with the way high-resolution LCDs turn everything exceedingly tiny, is there some solution of which I should be aware?

You could try resizing various parts of windows. However, the resolution might not actually be bad since you increase monitor size whenever you increase resolution usually.
January 29, 2009 5:27:31 PM

Any way to make the VP920b a TV monitor connected to a satelite box?
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