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is my moniter faulty? samsung 225BW

Last response: in Computer Peripherals
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January 2, 2007 9:16:58 AM

I just recently bought the Samsung 225BW

However I got it from CompUSA, Anyway Im not to LCD savvy and want to know if i got a faulty moniter or if the problems i have with mine are just part of owning an LCD right now.

i have it hooked up with a DVI cable and all drivers installed and software it came with.

1. I have pretty bad backlight bleeding on top and bottom of moniter which i assumed i would get going into this just did not think it would be as bad as it is.

2. It occasionally flickers a full black screen with no errors then returns back to whatever i was doing it is very random.

3. the color distortion, It is so much noticably lighter on the bottom half of the screen then the top. and i have played with all the color setings. however if i tilt the moniter so it faces practically downward this goes away. however nobody would use there moniter with it facing down the angle is way to bogus. colors are so much darker at top then bottom drives me nuts.

and then just a question i have. why does the auto adjust button not work? and if i wanted to use a different resolution other then the native 1680 x 1050 so everything appears bigger how can i make it so everything looks half way decent? or does this have to do with not having 1:1 scaling ???( sometimes i like a bigger resolution , my eyes are bad =) )

P.S. i have a 7600GT. anybody else with this display have any issues? i wanna know befor my 14 days are up so i can take it back, i really dont want to for i really like this moniter it seems to have great potential.
January 2, 2007 2:14:24 PM

Quote:
1. I have pretty bad backlight bleeding on top and bottom of moniter which i assumed i would get going into this just did not think it would be as bad as it is.
The model you got is a TN panel type (the worst for viewing angles). If you get a TN panel, you will have this problem.

[code:1:afbdcb64d6]2. It occasionally flickers a full black screen with no errors then returns back to whatever i was doing it is very random.[/code:1:afbdcb64d6]
That might be a hardware issue... but don't really know.

[code:1:afbdcb64d6]3. the color distortion, It is so much noticably lighter on the bottom half of the screen then the top. and i have played with all the color setings. however if i tilt the moniter so it faces practically downward this goes away. however nobody would use there moniter with it facing down the angle is way to bogus. colors are so much darker at top then bottom drives me nuts.[/code:1:afbdcb64d6]Same as #1. It is a TN panel. You can basically ignore everything on the box because it is wrong anyways. The way to buy an LCD is to find out the panel type and that will tell you a whole lot about what quality the picture will be in terms of viewing angle (contrast and brightness are pretty worthless specs). Then, if possibly, try and see if your monitor's response time was tested by xbitlabs.com since the one listed on the box is, you guessed it, wrong too. Finally, two other things you might want to check is whether you want a monitor with a matte or glossy finish, and if you are picking a TN panel, whether it is 8-bit or 6-bit.

Quote:
and then just a question i have. why does the auto adjust button not work? and if i wanted to use a different resolution other then the native 1680 x 1050 so everything appears bigger how can i make it so everything looks half way decent? or does this have to do with not having 1:1 scaling ???( sometimes i like a bigger resolution , my eyes are bad =) )

Do you want a higher resolution? Your monitor doesn't go any higher?
Do you want a lower resolution? Change it in your monitor or video card settings?
Do you want to change whether it scales the image or maps it 1:1 per pixel? you can change that in your specialized video card control panel area
January 3, 2007 12:15:18 PM

How are these monitor manufacturers such as Samsung able to print incorrect and false data on their monitors on the box? I think it's false advertising. Don't they have to print correct data and test results, i.e., correct response rates/timings, etc? There should be standardized tests for all monitors that are objectively tested by third parties and THOSE results should be on the box!
Related resources
January 3, 2007 6:06:15 PM

Background: A computer monitor combines various levels of red, green, and blue to make different colors (your eye is able to reproduce most colors from these three wavelengths, though not all color types). On a typical monitor, the monitor is capable of switching between 256 different shades of color (256 shades of red, 256 shades of blue, 256 shades of green). These shades vary from pure red to black (for red), pure blue to black (for blue), pure green to black (for green). Combining the three shades in every possible combination results in a total of 16,777,216 possible colors (256x256x256) that such a monitor can reproduce.

Response time: response time is the measure of how fast it takes a pixel to change from one of these 256 shades to another shade. However, for LCDs it takes them much much longer to change from shade to another than for others. For example on many early LCD monitors the transition from white to black is much much faster than the other transitions (like from a dark grey to another dark grey). However, one of the worthless spec companies defined response time as the transition between white and black, totally ignoring the 65,000+ other combinations (multiply 256x256). In addition, because black to white is usually the fastest transition, with the rest of them often being much higher, the result is a spec on the box that:
1) shows a response time much, much lower than what you will normally see
2) shows a response time for only 1 out of 65,000+ possibilities

Because of this problem, another worthless (though more helpful) spec was introduced: grey to grey response time. Unfortunatly, there is no agreement to how this test should be run. Some manufacturers might average all the response times together, some might use this spec for when overdrive is added to the monitor, but still only test the white to black transition, while others might test a single transition in the middle (a grey to a grey color). Even if there were agreement to how to run this test; it too is nearly just as worthless, because once again it gives you 1 number, when there are over 65,000 possibilities! How can you judge a response time from one number?
January 11, 2007 3:32:35 PM

Hope my reply doesn't come in too late for you.
I'm using a Samsung 225BW and I'm quite happy with it. You may have had a faulty one. I don't have any of the problems you mentioned.
Of course, you installed the driver properly (have you checked the Website for the most current drivers).
It is, as it was said earlier in this thread, a TN panel. However, TN technology was one the first technology used in LCD manufacturing, and thus has now matured quite a bit. People spitting on TN-based panels nowadays are neglecting a mature technology that is offering affordable quality.
Don't turn your back on it, just try another one.
!