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16-bit Applications

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Anonymous
July 4, 2005 2:26:53 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

What I want to know is how do I tell that I'm running a 16-bit program? If
Task Manager doesn't show "wowexec.exe" running, must I initiate Task
Manager after each program I run to determine whether it's a 16-bit program?

Is there a way to identify all 16-bit applications on my system?
Lanny

More about : bit applications

Anonymous
July 4, 2005 4:41:22 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

If there is no problem with a 16-bit program, what do you care?

HOW TO: Identify a 16-bit Program in Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;320127

--
Hope this helps. Let us know.

Wes
MS-MVP Windows Shell/User

In news:%23bS$V2LgFHA.1044@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl,
Lanny Bender <lambserve1(AT)cox(DOT)net> hunted and pecked:
> What I want to know is how do I tell that I'm running a 16-bit program?
> If Task Manager doesn't show "wowexec.exe" running, must I initiate Task
> Manager after each program I run to determine whether it's a 16-bit
> program?
>
> Is there a way to identify all 16-bit applications on my system?
> Lanny
Anonymous
July 4, 2005 10:43:10 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

From his spyware and virus infected Windoze box, "Lanny Bender" <lambserve
(AT)cox(DOT)net> had this to say:

> What I want to know is how do I tell that I'm running a 16-bit program?
> If Task Manager doesn't show "wowexec.exe" running, must I initiate Task
> Manager after each program I run to determine whether it's a 16-bit
> program?
>
> Is there a way to identify all 16-bit applications on my system?
> Lanny

Why would you care about what bit rate an application is running in,
provided it runs and does the job you want it to do? What's so magical
about 32-bit applications other than the fact they can address more memory
and are generally just more bloatware?


--
Get Microsoft PowerToys for Windows XP here:
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/downloads/powertoys/...
"A must-have for your Toy Operating System"
Related resources
Anonymous
July 4, 2005 10:43:11 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"NoStop" <nostop@stopspam.com> wrote in message
news:2rfye.157499$El.83347@pd7tw1no...
> From his spyware and virus infected Windoze box, "Lanny Bender" <lambserve
> (AT)cox(DOT)net> had this to say:
>
> > What I want to know is how do I tell that I'm running a 16-bit program?
> > If Task Manager doesn't show "wowexec.exe" running, must I initiate Task
> > Manager after each program I run to determine whether it's a 16-bit
> > program?
> >
> > Is there a way to identify all 16-bit applications on my system?
> > Lanny
>
> Why would you care about what bit rate an application is running in,
> provided it runs and does the job you want it to do? What's so magical
> about 32-bit applications other than the fact they can address more memory
> and are generally just more bloatware?
>
>
> --
> Get Microsoft PowerToys for Windows XP here:
> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/downloads/powertoys/...
> "A must-have for your Toy Operating System"
>
Wesley Vogel pointed me to a KB that answered my question, and apparently
yours as well. I quote from the KB: " If any 16-bit programs are running,
you see an entry for Ntvdm.exe, which is the virtual DOS machine that is
provided by Windows XP. You also see wowexec.exe (the Windows on Windows
subsystem), and the executable name of each 16-bit program that is running
in that WOW virtual machine."

Talk about memory bloat. When you get through running a 16-bit application,
both wowexec.exe and Ntvdm.exe usually stay in memory. Hence, my 2nd
question: "Is there a way to identify all 16-bit applications on my system?"
I just wanted to know when to remove wowexec.exe and Ntvdm.exe from memory.
I usually multitask a lot and frequently I run out of 512MB memory. So I
have to activate Task Manager to see what applications I can delete. I just
wanted to know beforehand what my 16-bit applications were.

Oh well, I guess I have to buy more RAM. BTW, my system STAYS free of
malware.
Lanny
Anonymous
July 6, 2005 3:10:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Lanny,

One way to see if an *.exe is 16-bit, is to locate the *.exe and if the icon
is the #2 icon. I don't know what it's called, looks like a batch file icon
without the gear.

Locate the *.exe right click it and select Properties.

If a Properties sheet pops up with eight tabs:
General
Program
Font
Memory
Screen
Misc
Compatibility
Summary

You have a 16-bit program.

If MS-DOS is showing on the Program tab, it's 16-bit.

If clicking the Advanced button on the Program tab shows Windows PIF
settings, it's 16-bit.
-----

You are correct, ntvdm.exe and wowexec.exe seem to keep running after the
16-bit application has stopped.

Apparently, "This behavior is a design feature of Windows NT."

WOW Environment Remains in Memory After Quitting 16-Bit Program
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;181333

--
Hope this helps. Let us know.

Wes
MS-MVP Windows Shell/User

In news:eU1HogOgFHA.3104@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl,
Lanny Bender <lambserve1(AT)cox(DOT)net> hunted and pecked:
> "NoStop" <nostop@stopspam.com> wrote in message
> news:2rfye.157499$El.83347@pd7tw1no...
>> From his spyware and virus infected Windoze box, "Lanny Bender"
>> <lambserve (AT)cox(DOT)net> had this to say:
>>
>>> What I want to know is how do I tell that I'm running a 16-bit program?
>>> If Task Manager doesn't show "wowexec.exe" running, must I initiate Task
>>> Manager after each program I run to determine whether it's a 16-bit
>>> program?
>>>
>>> Is there a way to identify all 16-bit applications on my system?
>>> Lanny
>>
>> Why would you care about what bit rate an application is running in,
>> provided it runs and does the job you want it to do? What's so magical
>> about 32-bit applications other than the fact they can address more
>> memory and are generally just more bloatware?
>>
>>
>> --
>> Get Microsoft PowerToys for Windows XP here:
>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/downloads/powertoys/...
>> "A must-have for your Toy Operating System"
>>
> Wesley Vogel pointed me to a KB that answered my question, and apparently
> yours as well. I quote from the KB: " If any 16-bit programs are running,
> you see an entry for Ntvdm.exe, which is the virtual DOS machine that is
> provided by Windows XP. You also see wowexec.exe (the Windows on Windows
> subsystem), and the executable name of each 16-bit program that is running
> in that WOW virtual machine."
>
> Talk about memory bloat. When you get through running a 16-bit
> application, both wowexec.exe and Ntvdm.exe usually stay in memory.
> Hence, my 2nd question: "Is there a way to identify all 16-bit
> applications on my system?" I just wanted to know when to remove
> wowexec.exe and Ntvdm.exe from memory. I usually multitask a lot and
> frequently I run out of 512MB memory. So I have to activate Task Manager
> to see what applications I can delete. I just wanted to know beforehand
> what my 16-bit applications were.
>
> Oh well, I guess I have to buy more RAM. BTW, my system STAYS free of
> malware.
> Lanny
Anonymous
July 6, 2005 3:48:24 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

If it truly is an issue, you could replace those Windows 3.1 programs
with current.

Lanny Bender wrote:


>
> Wesley Vogel pointed me to a KB that answered my question, and apparently
> yours as well. I quote from the KB: " If any 16-bit programs are running,
> you see an entry for Ntvdm.exe, which is the virtual DOS machine that is
> provided by Windows XP. You also see wowexec.exe (the Windows on Windows
> subsystem), and the executable name of each 16-bit program that is running
> in that WOW virtual machine."
>
> Talk about memory bloat. When you get through running a 16-bit application,
> both wowexec.exe and Ntvdm.exe usually stay in memory. Hence, my 2nd
> question: "Is there a way to identify all 16-bit applications on my system?"
> I just wanted to know when to remove wowexec.exe and Ntvdm.exe from memory.
> I usually multitask a lot and frequently I run out of 512MB memory. So I
> have to activate Task Manager to see what applications I can delete. I just
> wanted to know beforehand what my 16-bit applications were.
>
> Oh well, I guess I have to buy more RAM. BTW, my system STAYS free of
> malware.
> Lanny
>
>
Anonymous
July 7, 2005 7:16:31 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

They don't stay in memory unless something is using them, though they seem to take any excuse to crash. But so what?

If memory isn't being used it gets swapped out. Therefore in a period of time (quickly if you need the memory) it will use 0 bytes of memory. Win16 programs run in the same process - therefore they are very memory efficient - the more running the more efficient (process creation is resource intensive in Windows OSs) not to mention they tend to use approx 1/2 the memory and disk space of 32 bit programs (a bit less as text, icons, etc stay the same size).

As you can access 4.5 gibytes of memory (with one hard drive - 64.5 gibytes with 16 hard drives) it is strange you are running out. Perhaps you need to undo tweaks you made to your swap file.

--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://webdiary.smh.com.au/archives/_comment/001075.htm...
=================================================
"Lanny Bender" <lambserve1(AT)cox(DOT)net> wrote in message news:eU1HogOgFHA.3104@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>
> "NoStop" <nostop@stopspam.com> wrote in message
> news:2rfye.157499$El.83347@pd7tw1no...
>> From his spyware and virus infected Windoze box, "Lanny Bender" <lambserve
>> (AT)cox(DOT)net> had this to say:
>>
>> > What I want to know is how do I tell that I'm running a 16-bit program?
>> > If Task Manager doesn't show "wowexec.exe" running, must I initiate Task
>> > Manager after each program I run to determine whether it's a 16-bit
>> > program?
>> >
>> > Is there a way to identify all 16-bit applications on my system?
>> > Lanny
>>
>> Why would you care about what bit rate an application is running in,
>> provided it runs and does the job you want it to do? What's so magical
>> about 32-bit applications other than the fact they can address more memory
>> and are generally just more bloatware?
>>
>>
>> --
>> Get Microsoft PowerToys for Windows XP here:
>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/downloads/powertoys/...
>> "A must-have for your Toy Operating System"
>>
> Wesley Vogel pointed me to a KB that answered my question, and apparently
> yours as well. I quote from the KB: " If any 16-bit programs are running,
> you see an entry for Ntvdm.exe, which is the virtual DOS machine that is
> provided by Windows XP. You also see wowexec.exe (the Windows on Windows
> subsystem), and the executable name of each 16-bit program that is running
> in that WOW virtual machine."
>
> Talk about memory bloat. When you get through running a 16-bit application,
> both wowexec.exe and Ntvdm.exe usually stay in memory. Hence, my 2nd
> question: "Is there a way to identify all 16-bit applications on my system?"
> I just wanted to know when to remove wowexec.exe and Ntvdm.exe from memory.
> I usually multitask a lot and frequently I run out of 512MB memory. So I
> have to activate Task Manager to see what applications I can delete. I just
> wanted to know beforehand what my 16-bit applications were.
>
> Oh well, I guess I have to buy more RAM. BTW, my system STAYS free of
> malware.
> Lanny
>
>
Anonymous
July 7, 2005 7:25:54 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Only windows programs keep wow in memory (wow needs ntvdm). Dos programs don't use wow and ntvdm does not stay in memory..
--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://webdiary.smh.com.au/archives/_comment/001075.htm...
=================================================
"Wesley Vogel" <123WVogel955@comcast.net> wrote in message news:%23YwDg1kgFHA.2644@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Lanny,
>
> One way to see if an *.exe is 16-bit, is to locate the *.exe and if the icon
> is the #2 icon. I don't know what it's called, looks like a batch file icon
> without the gear.
>
> Locate the *.exe right click it and select Properties.
>
> If a Properties sheet pops up with eight tabs:
> General
> Program
> Font
> Memory
> Screen
> Misc
> Compatibility
> Summary
>
> You have a 16-bit program.
>
> If MS-DOS is showing on the Program tab, it's 16-bit.
>
> If clicking the Advanced button on the Program tab shows Windows PIF
> settings, it's 16-bit.
> -----
>
> You are correct, ntvdm.exe and wowexec.exe seem to keep running after the
> 16-bit application has stopped.
>
> Apparently, "This behavior is a design feature of Windows NT."
>
> WOW Environment Remains in Memory After Quitting 16-Bit Program
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;181333
>
> --
> Hope this helps. Let us know.
>
> Wes
> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>
> In news:eU1HogOgFHA.3104@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl,
> Lanny Bender <lambserve1(AT)cox(DOT)net> hunted and pecked:
>> "NoStop" <nostop@stopspam.com> wrote in message
>> news:2rfye.157499$El.83347@pd7tw1no...
>>> From his spyware and virus infected Windoze box, "Lanny Bender"
>>> <lambserve (AT)cox(DOT)net> had this to say:
>>>
>>>> What I want to know is how do I tell that I'm running a 16-bit program?
>>>> If Task Manager doesn't show "wowexec.exe" running, must I initiate Task
>>>> Manager after each program I run to determine whether it's a 16-bit
>>>> program?
>>>>
>>>> Is there a way to identify all 16-bit applications on my system?
>>>> Lanny
>>>
>>> Why would you care about what bit rate an application is running in,
>>> provided it runs and does the job you want it to do? What's so magical
>>> about 32-bit applications other than the fact they can address more
>>> memory and are generally just more bloatware?
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Get Microsoft PowerToys for Windows XP here:
>>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/downloads/powertoys/...
>>> "A must-have for your Toy Operating System"
>>>
>> Wesley Vogel pointed me to a KB that answered my question, and apparently
>> yours as well. I quote from the KB: " If any 16-bit programs are running,
>> you see an entry for Ntvdm.exe, which is the virtual DOS machine that is
>> provided by Windows XP. You also see wowexec.exe (the Windows on Windows
>> subsystem), and the executable name of each 16-bit program that is running
>> in that WOW virtual machine."
>>
>> Talk about memory bloat. When you get through running a 16-bit
>> application, both wowexec.exe and Ntvdm.exe usually stay in memory.
>> Hence, my 2nd question: "Is there a way to identify all 16-bit
>> applications on my system?" I just wanted to know when to remove
>> wowexec.exe and Ntvdm.exe from memory. I usually multitask a lot and
>> frequently I run out of 512MB memory. So I have to activate Task Manager
>> to see what applications I can delete. I just wanted to know beforehand
>> what my 16-bit applications were.
>>
>> Oh well, I guess I have to buy more RAM. BTW, my system STAYS free of
>> malware.
>> Lanny
>
!