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BSOD Due to Windows?

Last response: in Windows 7
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September 5, 2012 1:17:14 AM

I'm getting a consistant BSOD due to what I think to be a Windows installation issue. I used to have a CyberPower PC and I used the CD from that which deliberately states "Only to be used with a CyberPower PC System". Well, during installation @ around the 20% mark, I get a BSOD with randomly, and usually different, error messages. Should I just buy another OEM disc from Newegg/Amazon or is there something else I'm doing wrong?

More about : bsod due windows

September 5, 2012 1:25:35 AM

I seriously doubt thats the cause, i would do a memtest first.
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September 5, 2012 1:35:41 AM

vegettonox said:
I seriously doubt thats the cause, i would do a memtest first.

A what? For RAM? I have used it in my old system and just installed it in my new rig. That isn't a problem, is it?
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September 5, 2012 1:49:08 AM

You can download a windows .iso and make a bootable USB key pretty easily (as long as you have a valid product key). Might be worth a shot just in case there is some issue with the CD.
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a b $ Windows 7
September 5, 2012 1:50:44 AM

It could be. Especially if you had older RAM. For example old 1st generation DDR3 can need as much as 1.8 or 1.9 volts. This will basically destroy a new CPU with an onboard memory controller needing 1.5v RAM max.

List your exact system specs.

A scratched installation disk could be the problem as well.
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September 5, 2012 1:57:15 AM

anort3 said:
It could be. Especially if you had older RAM. For example old 1st generation DDR3 can need as much as 1.8 or 1.9 volts. This will basically destroy a new CPU with an onboard memory controller needing 1.5v RAM max.

List your exact system specs.

A scratched installation disk could be the problem as well.

It's Corsair Vengeance 2400MHz 8gb (two sticks)
Other system info:
Antec 900 Series Mid-tower case
PNY GeForce GTX 580
Gigabyte Z77-UD3H Motherboard
Intel Core i5 3570k
Western Digital 500gb 7200rpm HDD
Crucial M4 128gb SSD
Corsair 750w PSU
Killer Xeno Network Card (helps with ping and wireless activity) - Ethernet only, not wireless.
Linksys AE2500 Wireless adapter
LG optical drive
Windows 7 Home Premium
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a b $ Windows 7
September 5, 2012 12:05:23 PM

Run memtest86. Knowing the BSOD messages would help a bit, but given its more then one, I suspect RAM [one of the few things that can cause several BSOD's to come up].
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September 5, 2012 1:09:23 PM

Random restarts and blue screens almost always relate to either psu or ram, if your 100 percent positive your new power supply is working then test your ram. I would highly recommend you get a power supply from a working system, from a friend or whatever, and try it. When it comes to diagnosing issues, having "known good" components to try is a godsend.
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September 5, 2012 1:38:08 PM

vegettonox said:
Random restarts and blue screens almost always relate to either psu or ram, if your 100 percent positive your new power supply is working then test your ram. I would highly recommend you get a power supply from a working system, from a friend or whatever, and try it. When it comes to diagnosing issues, having "known good" components to try is a godsend.

I know my PSU is still good. One specific BSOD I know I get is sometimes "Page fault in non paged area". There are other random ones too.
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September 5, 2012 2:22:22 PM

^^ it does sound like ram, but equally could be CPU overheating... just another possibilty that can throw random errors as the crash can occur at any time/during any process.
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a b $ Windows 7
September 5, 2012 5:34:47 PM

The memory controller is on the CPU and as such you are overclocking it running anything faster than 1.5v DDR3 1600 for Ivy Bridge. Not only have I seen faster than spec and very low cas latency RAM cause problems with Sandy and Ivy Bridge it's a waste of money with gains only in certain situations around 1% over DDR3 1600. So you end up paying 70 or 80% more for a 1% gain you don't see anywhere but benchmarks. In gaming the gain is usually 0.
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September 5, 2012 10:41:46 PM

anort3 said:
The memory controller is on the CPU and as such you are overclocking it running anything faster than 1.5v DDR3 1600 for Ivy Bridge. Not only have I seen faster than spec and very low cas latency RAM cause problems with Sandy and Ivy Bridge it's a waste of money with gains only in certain situations around 1% over DDR3 1600. So you end up paying 70 or 80% more for a 1% gain you don't see anywhere but benchmarks. In gaming the gain is usually 0.

So out of all that, you're saying that my RAM is bad? But I'm getting the BSOD when installing Windows.
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a b $ Windows 7
September 5, 2012 11:32:20 PM

No it's not necessarily bad. It could be the problem though. Just let it default in BIOS to DDR3 1333 or 1600 or whatever it tries to run at. If you were getting Page fault errors before then that usually means memory problems.

What did you upgrade from? DDR3 2400 is a new memory spec. I can't imagine anything that would run with it needed upgrading unless you went from AMD to Intel or something.
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September 5, 2012 11:41:42 PM

anort3 said:
No it's not necessarily bad. It could be the problem though. Just let it default in BIOS to DDR3 1333 or 1600 or whatever it tries to run at. If you were getting Page fault errors before then that usually means memory problems.

What did you upgrade from? DDR3 2400 is a new memory spec. I can't imagine anything that would run with it needed upgrading unless you went from AMD to Intel or something.

imgur.com/j9Ccc
I just tried to install Windows, that's the message I got.
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a b $ Windows 7
September 6, 2012 12:50:11 AM

Looks to me like thats not a full version of Windows. Or the disk is scratched or corrupted somehow.
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a b $ Windows 7
September 6, 2012 12:02:49 PM

Quote:
Page fault in non paged area


RAM. No point in going any farther until a memory test is run. This is one of the four BSOD messages that will 9/10 times mean bad RAM. I could probably guess the other BSOD messages you're getting at this point (MEMORY_MANAGEMENT and IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL_TO).

Run memtest86. No point in talking any farther until this step is taken.
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September 6, 2012 2:08:32 PM

How do I run that? I used the RAM in an AMD board before switching to Intel, would that make a difference?
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September 6, 2012 7:45:38 PM

gamerk316 said:
Quote:
Page fault in non paged area


RAM. No point in going any farther until a memory test is run. This is one of the four BSOD messages that will 9/10 times mean bad RAM. I could probably guess the other BSOD messages you're getting at this point (MEMORY_MANAGEMENT and IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL_TO).

Run memtest86. No point in talking any farther until this step is taken.

Actually, yes. Those are the two other messages I've been getting lol
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a b $ Windows 7
September 6, 2012 10:16:44 PM

As I said above let the RAM run at default speed in BIOS or manually set it to 1.5v DDR3 1333 cas 9-9-9-27. That should at least get you through a boot. It's not good RAM for an Ivy Bridge setup but you might get it to work with some trial and error. Faster and more expensive is not always better. This is a good example why it's a good idea to do some research before buying.
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September 6, 2012 10:30:21 PM

anort3 said:
As I said above let the RAM run at default speed in BIOS or manually set it to 1.5v DDR3 1333 cas 9-9-9-27. That should at least get you through a boot. It's not good RAM for an Ivy Bridge setup but you might get it to work with some trial and error. Faster and more expensive is not always better. This is a good example why it's a good idea to do some research before buying.

So what RAM should I replace it with? Apparently RAM is the issue.
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September 7, 2012 7:46:30 PM

anort3 said:
The memory controller is on the CPU and as such you are overclocking it running anything faster than 1.5v DDR3 1600 for Ivy Bridge. Not only have I seen faster than spec and very low cas latency RAM cause problems with Sandy and Ivy Bridge it's a waste of money with gains only in certain situations around 1% over DDR3 1600. So you end up paying 70 or 80% more for a 1% gain you don't see anywhere but benchmarks. In gaming the gain is usually 0.

Umm... what?
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