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network failure..

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  • Windows XP
Last response: in Windows XP
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Anonymous
July 5, 2005 9:03:20 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Today I notice that my WinME (ICS host) and WinXP (client) can't communicate
(simple peer to peer setup). First clue was when I couldn't send a print
job from my ME to the XP where the printer is connected. XP pc reports
"network unplugged". A forced "disable" and then an "enable" doesn't help.
I also notice that the little lights for the network cards are not lit up.
I thought they would normally BE lit up if the computers are on, right?
However.. the lights on the network cards/ports on BOTH machines are off.

Could both network cards have failed simulateously?
Any ideas on what to do?

I've since rebooted both machines in various order. No difference. The
ICS network is dead.


At both the XP and ME pc, I can PING to 127.0.0.1:
------------------------------------------------------------------
C:\Windows>ping 127.0.0.1

Pinging 127.0.0.1 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128

Ping statistics for 127.0.0.1:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms

-------------------------------------------------------
But this is the result with "ipconfig" at the MSDOS prompt on the XP pc:

Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
(C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.

C:\Documents and Settings\user>ipconfig

Windows IP Configuration


Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected

More about : network failure

Anonymous
July 5, 2005 9:03:21 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

In article <5ACye.3766$is5.385807@news20.bellglobal.com>, "Ogg"
<sorry-nopam-wanted@anywhere.com> wrote:
>Today I notice that my WinME (ICS host) and WinXP (client) can't communicate
>(simple peer to peer setup). First clue was when I couldn't send a print
>job from my ME to the XP where the printer is connected. XP pc reports
>"network unplugged". A forced "disable" and then an "enable" doesn't help.
>I also notice that the little lights for the network cards are not lit up.
>I thought they would normally BE lit up if the computers are on, right?
>However.. the lights on the network cards/ports on BOTH machines are off.
>
>Could both network cards have failed simulateously?
>Any ideas on what to do?
>
>I've since rebooted both machines in various order. No difference. The
>ICS network is dead.
>
>
>At both the XP and ME pc, I can PING to 127.0.0.1:
>------------------------------------------------------------------
>C:\Windows>ping 127.0.0.1
>
>Pinging 127.0.0.1 with 32 bytes of data:
>
>Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
>Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
>Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
>Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
>
>Ping statistics for 127.0.0.1:
> Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
>Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
> Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms
>
>-------------------------------------------------------
>But this is the result with "ipconfig" at the MSDOS prompt on the XP pc:
>
>Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
>(C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.
>
>C:\Documents and Settings\user>ipconfig
>
>Windows IP Configuration
>
>
>Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:
>
> Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected

Pinging 127.0.0.1 doesn't tell you anything about the network. It can
even work on a computer with no Ethernet adapter installed.

How are the computers physically networked?

If they're connected directly to each other using a crossover cable,
the cable might have gone bad or become unplugged.

If they're connected to a hub/switch/router with two regular Ethernet
cables, the hub/switch/router might have gone bad. As a first step,
unplug the power and plug it back in.
--
Best Wishes,
Steve Winograd, MS-MVP (Windows Networking)

Please post any reply as a follow-up message in the news group
for everyone to see. I'm sorry, but I don't answer questions
addressed directly to me in E-mail or news groups.

Microsoft Most Valuable Professional Program
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
Anonymous
July 5, 2005 10:23:04 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Steve Winograd [MVP]" <winograd@pobox.com> wrote in message...


> Pinging 127.0.0.1 doesn't tell you anything about the network. It can
> even work on a computer with no Ethernet adapter installed.
>
> How are the computers physically networked?
>
> If they're connected directly to each other using a crossover cable,
> the cable might have gone bad or become unplugged.
>
> If they're connected to a hub/switch/router with two regular Ethernet
> cables, the hub/switch/router might have gone bad. As a first step,
> unplug the power and plug it back in.

THANK you for your reply. The computers are connected p2p (via 50ft
ethernet cable + a mating connector + 6ft crossover). I've checked the
cable run and all is as it should be - tucked along the floor next to the
walls and out of the way. I've unconnected and reconnected every interface
point.

I had no idea that pinging 127.0.0.1 could lead to false detection. Thanks
for the tip.
Related resources
Anonymous
July 5, 2005 10:23:05 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

In article <MKDye.3892$is5.395613@news20.bellglobal.com>, "Ogg"
<sorry-nopam-wanted@anywhere.com> wrote:
>> Pinging 127.0.0.1 doesn't tell you anything about the network. It can
>> even work on a computer with no Ethernet adapter installed.
>>
>> How are the computers physically networked?
>>
>> If they're connected directly to each other using a crossover cable,
>> the cable might have gone bad or become unplugged.
>>
>> If they're connected to a hub/switch/router with two regular Ethernet
>> cables, the hub/switch/router might have gone bad. As a first step,
>> unplug the power and plug it back in.
>
>THANK you for your reply. The computers are connected p2p (via 50ft
>ethernet cable + a mating connector + 6ft crossover). I've checked the
>cable run and all is as it should be - tucked along the floor next to the
>walls and out of the way. I've unconnected and reconnected every interface
>point.

I suspect that the Ethernet cable, connector, or crossover cable has
become defective. Can you move the computers close enough together to
connect them using only the crossover cable?

>I had no idea that pinging 127.0.0.1 could lead to false detection. Thanks
>for the tip.

You're welcome!
--
Best Wishes,
Steve Winograd, MS-MVP (Windows Networking)

Please post any reply as a follow-up message in the news group
for everyone to see. I'm sorry, but I don't answer questions
addressed directly to me in E-mail or news groups.

Microsoft Most Valuable Professional Program
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
Anonymous
July 5, 2005 11:47:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Steve Winograd [MVP]" <winograd@pobox.com> wrote...

> I suspect that the Ethernet cable, connector, or crossover cable has
> become defective. Can you move the computers close enough together to
> connect them using only the crossover cable?

I'll have to move the WinME pc then. :(  Trying that with just the
crossover seems like a logical 1st try. But if that fails, the problem
could still be the crossover or either NIC. :(  ..and won't bring me
closer to solving the mystery.

Is there no diagnostic that one can run to test installed NICs? The XP pc
has an integrated LAN (Realtek RTL 8139).

I remember using a command line command that "refreshed the routing table".
I can't remember what that is now. I thought it was either a NETSTAT or a
NET command parameter.
Anonymous
July 6, 2005 12:56:27 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

In article <wZEye.4282$is5.408311@news20.bellglobal.com>, "Ogg"
<sorry-nopam-wanted@anywhere.com> wrote:
>"Steve Winograd [MVP]" <winograd@pobox.com> wrote...
>
>> I suspect that the Ethernet cable, connector, or crossover cable has
>> become defective. Can you move the computers close enough together to
>> connect them using only the crossover cable?
>
>I'll have to move the WinME pc then. :(  Trying that with just the
>crossover seems like a logical 1st try. But if that fails, the problem
>could still be the crossover or either NIC. :(  ..and won't bring me
>closer to solving the mystery.
>
>Is there no diagnostic that one can run to test installed NICs? The XP pc
>has an integrated LAN (Realtek RTL 8139).
>
>I remember using a command line command that "refreshed the routing table".
>I can't remember what that is now. I thought it was either a NETSTAT or a
>NET command parameter.

Scanning the system with the "netsh diag gui" command on XP might tell
you something about the network adapter.

There's a Realtek Windows diagnostic program (which I haven't tried)
available here:

http://www.realtek.com.tw/downloads/downloads1-3.aspx?s...

I don't think that you'll find out anything useful from NETSTAT or
other TCP/IP commands, because your network connections don't have IP
addresses. ME and XP disable network protocols on network connections
that they think aren't physically connected to anything.
--
Best Wishes,
Steve Winograd, MS-MVP (Windows Networking)

Please post any reply as a follow-up message in the news group
for everyone to see. I'm sorry, but I don't answer questions
addressed directly to me in E-mail or news groups.

Microsoft Most Valuable Professional Program
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
Anonymous
July 7, 2005 4:20:08 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Steve Winograd [MVP]" <winograd@pobox.com> wrote..

> I suspect that the Ethernet cable, connector, or crossover cable has
> become defective. Can you move the computers close enough together to
> connect them using only the crossover cable?

Update. I tested the crossover cable between the XPhome pc and an XPpro pc.
Network cable was detected. Feeling confident that the cable and the NIC on
the XPhome pc are ok, I brought the WinME and XPhome pc close enough to use
just the x-over cable. No go. No detection. I reseated the WinME NIC card
in another slot. At bootup, the OS "detected new hardware". I thought that
was strange because all I did was move the NIC to another pci slot.
Anyway.. it prompted me for the driver (AON-325.SYS), which I provided. At
reboot, still no go.

I also manually uninstalled the AON-325 network card reference in
DeviceMangler and rebooted. Once again, it prompted me for the driver,
which I provided, rebooted.. but still no go.

So.. the OS identifies the NIC hardware and prompts for driver, but the
connection between the 2 computers is still dead. What now?
Anonymous
July 7, 2005 5:28:38 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

In article <u32ze.5509$is5.646007@news20.bellglobal.com>, "Ogg"
<sorry-nopam-wanted@anywhere.com> wrote:
>> I suspect that the Ethernet cable, connector, or crossover cable has
>> become defective. Can you move the computers close enough together to
>> connect them using only the crossover cable?
>
>Update. I tested the crossover cable between the XPhome pc and an XPpro pc.
>Network cable was detected. Feeling confident that the cable and the NIC on
>the XPhome pc are ok, I brought the WinME and XPhome pc close enough to use
>just the x-over cable. No go. No detection.

That suggests that the WinME NIC is defective.

>I reseated the WinME NIC card
>in another slot. At bootup, the OS "detected new hardware". I thought that
>was strange because all I did was move the NIC to another pci slot.

A device in a new slot is new hardware. BTW, you should un-install a
device in Device Manager before removing it or moving it to another
slot.

>Anyway.. it prompted me for the driver (AON-325.SYS), which I provided. At
>reboot, still no go.
>
>I also manually uninstalled the AON-325 network card reference in
>DeviceMangler and rebooted. Once again, it prompted me for the driver,
>which I provided, rebooted.. but still no go.

The system recognizes the NIC, but the NIC doesn't seem to be working.

>So.. the OS identifies the NIC hardware and prompts for driver, but the
>connection between the 2 computers is still dead. What now?

I think that the WinME NIC is defective. Here's what I'd do:

1. Un-install the NIC in Device Manager.

2. Move it back to its original slot, go to Device Manager, and
un-install it.

3. Remove the old NIC from the computer.

4. Buy and install a new NIC.


--
Best Wishes,
Steve Winograd, MS-MVP (Windows Networking)

Please post any reply as a follow-up message in the news group
for everyone to see. I'm sorry, but I don't answer questions
addressed directly to me in E-mail or news groups.

Microsoft Most Valuable Professional Program
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 12:08:52 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Ogg wrote:

> "Steve Winograd [MVP]" <winograd@pobox.com> wrote..
>
>
>>I suspect that the Ethernet cable, connector, or crossover cable has
>>become defective. Can you move the computers close enough together to
>>connect them using only the crossover cable?
>
>
> Update. I tested the crossover cable between the XPhome pc and an XPpro pc.
> Network cable was detected. Feeling confident that the cable and the NIC on
> the XPhome pc are ok, I brought the WinME and XPhome pc close enough to use
> just the x-over cable. No go. No detection. I reseated the WinME NIC card
> in another slot. At bootup, the OS "detected new hardware". I thought that
> was strange because all I did was move the NIC to another pci slot.

That is normal because different PCI slots use different hardware IRQs.

> Anyway.. it prompted me for the driver (AON-325.SYS), which I provided. At
> reboot, still no go.
>
> I also manually uninstalled the AON-325 network card reference in
> DeviceMangler and rebooted. Once again, it prompted me for the driver,
> which I provided, rebooted.. but still no go.
>
> So.. the OS identifies the NIC hardware and prompts for driver, but the
> connection between the 2 computers is still dead. What now?
>
>

Replace the NIC in the ME machine.

Steve
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 3:27:06 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Steve N." <Steve_N@nunya.biz.nes> wrote...

AA > >
> > ....I thought that
> > was strange because all I did was move the NIC to another pci slot. <<
AA


> That is normal because different PCI slots use different hardware IRQs.
> Replace the NIC in the ME machine.

Yup. that was it. Network now works fine. I just had a little trouble
when Windows autoconfigured for 169.254.*.* network subnet. Apparently this
assignment is not recognized by ICS. After a little trepidation, I
uninstalled ICS, and re-installed it from scratch. The network THEN
assigned the proper 192.168..0.1 and .2 addresses for the networked
computers. Internet works now too.
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 3:27:07 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Ogg wrote:

> "Steve N." <Steve_N@nunya.biz.nes> wrote...
>
> AA > >
>
>>>....I thought that
>>>was strange because all I did was move the NIC to another pci slot. <<
>
> AA
>
>
>
>>That is normal because different PCI slots use different hardware IRQs.
>>Replace the NIC in the ME machine.
>
>
> Yup. that was it. Network now works fine. I just had a little trouble
> when Windows autoconfigured for 169.254.*.* network subnet. Apparently this
> assignment is not recognized by ICS. After a little trepidation, I
> uninstalled ICS, and re-installed it from scratch. The network THEN
> assigned the proper 192.168..0.1 and .2 addresses for the networked
> computers. Internet works now too.
>
>

Yeah, Windows can be tenacious about cacheing IP addresses.

Glad you got it working.

Steve
!