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Gear's Quick Guide to 15 HD Camcorders

Last response: in Tom's Guide
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February 5, 2007 11:54:15 AM

High-definition camcorders are one of the super hot-ticket electronic devices this year. The number of available models is swelling rapidly and prices continue to drop.
February 5, 2007 2:25:11 PM

Thanks for the review. But which one the author likes the most? A table of strengths and weaknesses will be helpful. Or perhaps the only point was HD video is the only standard now. Such as getting a standard miniDV camcorder is like buying a new audio cassette player.
February 5, 2007 5:53:22 PM

Ehh excuse me, but your "Conclusions" page sucks!

You blabber on with well known facts about how expensive new technology is, facts even my grandmother knows.

Your "Conclusions" page COMPLETELY leaves out model recommendations, such as best overall, best value for money, etc.
February 5, 2007 11:27:15 PM

the canon uses cmos instead of ccd, that is a huge difference!
February 6, 2007 6:02:07 AM

Quote:
the canon uses cmos instead of ccd, that is a huge difference!


Please explain a little of the difference between cmos and CCD. Might make a good little article :D 
February 6, 2007 7:29:25 AM

Yes please explain the difference between the CMOS and CCD. I'm seriously getting ready to purchase the Sony HDR-HC7. Also, shouldn't I be looking for a camcorder that does true 1920 x 1080i instead of some camcorders that compress to 1440 x 1080i and converts it back to 1920 x 1080i when played back? Will this make a difference?
February 8, 2007 4:53:07 PM

I apologize for no recommendations, but I felt there were too many brand new models that have not been tested or even seen yet, so I felt it more prudent just to provide information at this point. Most likely, one of the 2007 releases will be both a 'recommended' item and a 'best buy', considering that HD camcorders are in their infancy, and that prices are dropping so rapidly.

As for CMOS vs. CCD, here is some info...

CCD – CCDs have traditionally been more sensitive to light, which usually produces a better dynamic range along with better overall uniformity. They consume more power then CMOS and are usually more expensive to produce.

CMOS - Traditionally, CMOS sensors were more susceptible to noise, causing poor low-light performance, but camcorder makers have made a great deal of improvements to their CMOS sensors. CMOS also has a faster data transfer rate capability and consumes less power for better battery life.

Although all theses differences are historically true, CMOS sensors are improving with each generation of camcorder, pushing CCD and CMOS sensors closer and closer in their characteristics and performances. Therefore, it is recommended each model is evaluated on its own image quality merits.
February 8, 2007 11:56:07 PM

Quote:
I apologize for no recommendations, but I felt there were too many brand new models that have not been tested or even seen yet, so I felt it more prudent just to provide information at this point. Most likely, one of the 2007 releases will be both a 'recommended' item and a 'best buy', considering that HD camcorders are in their infancy, and that prices are dropping so rapidly.

As for CMOS vs. CCD, here is some info...

CCD – CCDs have traditionally been more sensitive to light, which usually produces a better dynamic range along with better overall uniformity. They consume more power then CMOS and are usually more expensive to produce.

CMOS - Traditionally, CMOS sensors were more susceptible to noise, causing poor low-light performance, but camcorder makers have made a great deal of improvements to their CMOS sensors. CMOS also has a faster data transfer rate capability and consumes less power for better battery life.

Although all theses differences are historically true, CMOS sensors are improving with each generation of camcorder, pushing CCD and CMOS sensors closer and closer in their characteristics and performances. Therefore, it is recommended each model is evaluated on its own image quality merits.


Thanks for the info. It seems then CCD still has better quality.
February 9, 2007 12:54:59 PM

I think there are merits to both technologies right now and would not choose a HD camcorder based on sensor type, etc.
!