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Windows XP Home Edition Boot Problem

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Anonymous
July 6, 2005 12:02:04 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

My Grandfather and I are building a computer from scratch. We finished the
internal stuff. Then we formatted BIOS Program. Finally, we put in the
Windows XP Home Edition CD with SP 2.I had tried to install something, but
error occured, so this is my 2nd attempt to install. Getting ready starts
fine, then comes the menus.
The first Menu gave me the following options:
1. Setting up Windows XP Now
2. To repair a Windows XP Installtion using Recovery Console.
I chose to Set up Win. XP Now
Then the End-User's licence agreement comes. I do Accept.
Then it shows my Partitions to choose from. I've got two

C: Partition [NTFS} 76285 MB [76197 Free]
Unpartioned space 8 MB
I did not know where the Unpartioned space came from or what it means, so I
clicked C: Partition.
I got another menu giving me 3 options
1. Format the Partition using the NTFS File System (Quick)
2. Format the Partition using the NTFS File System
3. Leave the Current File System Intact
I choose Leaving the Current File System Intact.
Then Came another menu. There was a Windows Folder installed.
it gave me two options
1. Delete old folder, Make a new one.
2. Use Different Folder.
I choose Deleting the Old folder and making a new one.
It exmines the Disks and makes a list of files to me copied
During coping, it shows up numerous times saying that setup cannot copy a
certain file. It gives me the choice to retry of skip. I Retry.
Sooner or later in the middle of the coping, a tech error pops up.
Page_Fault_in_Non-Paged_Area
July 6, 2005 1:03:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

thelostgeek wrote:

> My Grandfather and I are building a computer from scratch. We finished
> the internal stuff. Then we formatted BIOS Program. Finally, we put in
> the Windows XP Home Edition CD with SP 2.I had tried to install
> something, but error occured, so this is my 2nd attempt to install.
> Getting ready starts fine, then comes the menus.
> The first Menu gave me the following options:
> 1. Setting up Windows XP Now
> 2. To repair a Windows XP Installtion using Recovery Console.
> I chose to Set up Win. XP Now
> Then the End-User's licence agreement comes. I do Accept.
> Then it shows my Partitions to choose from. I've got two
>
> C: Partition [NTFS} 76285 MB [76197 Free]
> Unpartioned space 8 MB
> I did not know where the Unpartioned space came from or what it means,
> so I clicked C: Partition.
> I got another menu giving me 3 options
> 1. Format the Partition using the NTFS File System (Quick)
> 2. Format the Partition using the NTFS File System
> 3. Leave the Current File System Intact
> I choose Leaving the Current File System Intact.
> Then Came another menu. There was a Windows Folder installed.
> it gave me two options
> 1. Delete old folder, Make a new one.
> 2. Use Different Folder.
> I choose Deleting the Old folder and making a new one.
> It exmines the Disks and makes a list of files to me copied
> During coping, it shows up numerous times saying that setup cannot
> copy a certain file. It gives me the choice to retry of skip. I Retry.
> Sooner or later in the middle of the coping, a tech error pops up.
> Page_Fault_in_Non-Paged_Area

Your post is a bit unclear as to exactly what you've done, but mainly
the issue is that your clean install of XPSP2 fails, right? Normally
failures to install an operating system are because of hardware
problems. The RAM you are using may be faulty or marginal, not right
for the motherboard, etc. I would test the RAM and other hardware
components, particularly since you built the machine yourself. Here are
general hardware troubleshooting steps - not everything will apply to
you. I've also included a link to installation instructions for XP:

1) Open the computer and run it open, cleaning out all dust bunnies and
observing all fans (overheating will cause system freezing). Obviously
you can't do this with a laptop, but you can hear if the fan is running
and feel if the laptop is getting too hot.

2) Test the RAM - I like Memtest86+ from www.memtest.org. Obviously, you
have to get the program from a working machine. You will either
download the precompiled Windows binary to make a bootable floppy or
the .iso to make a bootable cd. If you want to use the latter, you'll
need to have third-party burning software on the machine where you
download the file - XP's built-in burning capability won't do the job.
In either case, boot with the media you made. The test will run
immediately. Let the test run for an extended period of time - unless
errors are seen immediately. If you get any errors, replace the RAM.

3) Test the hard drive with a diagnostic utility from the mftr. Usually
you will download the file and make a bootable floppy with it. Boot
with the media and do a thorough test. If the drive has physical
errors, replace it.

4) The power supply may be going bad or be inadequate for the devices
you have in the system. The adequacy issue doesn't really apply to a
laptop, although of course the power
supply can be faulty.

5) Test the motherboard with something like TuffTest from
www.tufftest.com. Sometimes this is useful, and sometimes it isn't.

http://michaelstevenstech.com/cleanxpinstall.html - Clean Install

Malke
--
Elephant Boy Computers
www.elephantboycomputers.com
"Don't Panic!"
MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User
July 6, 2005 4:57:56 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

> thelostgeek wrote:
>
>> My Grandfather and I are building a computer from scratch. We finished
>> the internal stuff. Then we formatted BIOS Program. Finally, we put in
>> the Windows XP Home Edition CD with SP 2.I had tried to install
>> something, but error occured, so this is my 2nd attempt to install.
>> Getting ready starts fine, then comes the menus.
>> The first Menu gave me the following options:
>> 1. Setting up Windows XP Now
>> 2. To repair a Windows XP Installtion using Recovery Console.
>> I chose to Set up Win. XP Now
>> Then the End-User's licence agreement comes. I do Accept.
>> Then it shows my Partitions to choose from. I've got two
>>
>> C: Partition [NTFS} 76285 MB [76197 Free]
>> Unpartioned space 8 MB
>> I did not know where the Unpartioned space came from or what it means,
>> so I clicked C: Partition.
>> I got another menu giving me 3 options
>> 1. Format the Partition using the NTFS File System (Quick)
>> 2. Format the Partition using the NTFS File System
>> 3. Leave the Current File System Intact
>> I choose Leaving the Current File System Intact.
>> Then Came another menu. There was a Windows Folder installed.
>> it gave me two options
>> 1. Delete old folder, Make a new one.
>> 2. Use Different Folder.
>> I choose Deleting the Old folder and making a new one.
>> It exmines the Disks and makes a list of files to me copied
>> During coping, it shows up numerous times saying that setup cannot
>> copy a certain file. It gives me the choice to retry of skip. I Retry.
>> Sooner or later in the middle of the coping, a tech error pops up.
>> Page_Fault_in_Non-Paged_Area


"Malke" <invalid@not-real.com> wrote in message
news:%237F3yQkgFHA.4032@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Your post is a bit unclear as to exactly what you've done, but mainly
> the issue is that your clean install of XPSP2 fails, right? Normally
> failures to install an operating system are because of hardware
> problems. The RAM you are using may be faulty or marginal, not right
> for the motherboard, etc. I would test the RAM and other hardware
> components, particularly since you built the machine yourself. Here are
> general hardware troubleshooting steps - not everything will apply to
> you. I've also included a link to installation instructions for XP:
>
> 1) Open the computer and run it open, cleaning out all dust bunnies and
> observing all fans (overheating will cause system freezing). Obviously
> you can't do this with a laptop, but you can hear if the fan is running
> and feel if the laptop is getting too hot.
>
> 2) Test the RAM - I like Memtest86+ from www.memtest.org. Obviously, you
> have to get the program from a working machine. You will either
> download the precompiled Windows binary to make a bootable floppy or
> the .iso to make a bootable cd. If you want to use the latter, you'll
> need to have third-party burning software on the machine where you
> download the file - XP's built-in burning capability won't do the job.
> In either case, boot with the media you made. The test will run
> immediately. Let the test run for an extended period of time - unless
> errors are seen immediately. If you get any errors, replace the RAM.
>
> 3) Test the hard drive with a diagnostic utility from the mftr. Usually
> you will download the file and make a bootable floppy with it. Boot
> with the media and do a thorough test. If the drive has physical
> errors, replace it.
>
> 4) The power supply may be going bad or be inadequate for the devices
> you have in the system. The adequacy issue doesn't really apply to a
> laptop, although of course the power
> supply can be faulty.
>
> 5) Test the motherboard with something like TuffTest from
> www.tufftest.com. Sometimes this is useful, and sometimes it isn't.
>
> http://michaelstevenstech.com/cleanxpinstall.html - Clean Install
>
> Malke
> --
> Elephant Boy Computers
> www.elephantboycomputers.com
> "Don't Panic!"
> MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User


thelostgeek
Mr. Malke may be right - your problem may be due to a hardware defect, but I
really don't think so. At least not until we have more evidence that the
problem is hardware-related.

So let's start from scratch, OK?

I'm assuming two things at this stage...
1. You correctly built your computer, i.e., all of the components were
correctly installed and they are correctly connected/configured. So that
when you powered up your computer for the first time after assembly (with no
operating system having being installed at this time) there were no
strange/error messages that appeared on your monitor screen. Is that a fair
assumption?
I'm a little uneasy over your comment that you & your granddad "formatted
the BIOS Program". I trust you mean by that that you reviewed the system
settings of your motherboard's BIOS to ensure their correctness for your
specific installation. Do I have this right? And you're reasonably sure that
whatever changes or options you selected were the correct ones, right?

2. There is no data on your hard drive that you need at this point. I
mention this because what we are going to do (with your approval) is to
totally remove whatever contents are presently on that drive and start as if
the disk is "virgin". Is that OK?

So, if you want to go on, please respond to the above and we'll take it from
there step-by-step.
Anna
Related resources
Anonymous
July 6, 2005 4:57:57 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Anna" wrote:

> > thelostgeek wrote:
> >
> >> My Grandfather and I are building a computer from scratch. We finished
> >> the internal stuff. Then we formatted BIOS Program. Finally, we put in
> >> the Windows XP Home Edition CD with SP 2.I had tried to install
> >> something, but error occured, so this is my 2nd attempt to install.
> >> Getting ready starts fine, then comes the menus.
> >> The first Menu gave me the following options:
> >> 1. Setting up Windows XP Now
> >> 2. To repair a Windows XP Installtion using Recovery Console.
> >> I chose to Set up Win. XP Now
> >> Then the End-User's licence agreement comes. I do Accept.
> >> Then it shows my Partitions to choose from. I've got two
> >>
> >> C: Partition [NTFS} 76285 MB [76197 Free]
> >> Unpartioned space 8 MB
> >> I did not know where the Unpartioned space came from or what it means,
> >> so I clicked C: Partition.
> >> I got another menu giving me 3 options
> >> 1. Format the Partition using the NTFS File System (Quick)
> >> 2. Format the Partition using the NTFS File System
> >> 3. Leave the Current File System Intact
> >> I choose Leaving the Current File System Intact.
> >> Then Came another menu. There was a Windows Folder installed.
> >> it gave me two options
> >> 1. Delete old folder, Make a new one.
> >> 2. Use Different Folder.
> >> I choose Deleting the Old folder and making a new one.
> >> It exmines the Disks and makes a list of files to me copied
> >> During coping, it shows up numerous times saying that setup cannot
> >> copy a certain file. It gives me the choice to retry of skip. I Retry.
> >> Sooner or later in the middle of the coping, a tech error pops up.
> >> Page_Fault_in_Non-Paged_Area
>
>
> "Malke" <invalid@not-real.com> wrote in message
> news:%237F3yQkgFHA.4032@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> > Your post is a bit unclear as to exactly what you've done, but mainly
> > the issue is that your clean install of XPSP2 fails, right? Normally
> > failures to install an operating system are because of hardware
> > problems. The RAM you are using may be faulty or marginal, not right
> > for the motherboard, etc. I would test the RAM and other hardware
> > components, particularly since you built the machine yourself. Here are
> > general hardware troubleshooting steps - not everything will apply to
> > you. I've also included a link to installation instructions for XP:
> >
> > 1) Open the computer and run it open, cleaning out all dust bunnies and
> > observing all fans (overheating will cause system freezing). Obviously
> > you can't do this with a laptop, but you can hear if the fan is running
> > and feel if the laptop is getting too hot.
> >
> > 2) Test the RAM - I like Memtest86+ from www.memtest.org. Obviously, you
> > have to get the program from a working machine. You will either
> > download the precompiled Windows binary to make a bootable floppy or
> > the .iso to make a bootable cd. If you want to use the latter, you'll
> > need to have third-party burning software on the machine where you
> > download the file - XP's built-in burning capability won't do the job.
> > In either case, boot with the media you made. The test will run
> > immediately. Let the test run for an extended period of time - unless
> > errors are seen immediately. If you get any errors, replace the RAM.
> >
> > 3) Test the hard drive with a diagnostic utility from the mftr. Usually
> > you will download the file and make a bootable floppy with it. Boot
> > with the media and do a thorough test. If the drive has physical
> > errors, replace it.
> >
> > 4) The power supply may be going bad or be inadequate for the devices
> > you have in the system. The adequacy issue doesn't really apply to a
> > laptop, although of course the power
> > supply can be faulty.
> >
> > 5) Test the motherboard with something like TuffTest from
> > www.tufftest.com. Sometimes this is useful, and sometimes it isn't.
> >
> > http://michaelstevenstech.com/cleanxpinstall.html - Clean Install
> >
> > Malke
> > --
> > Elephant Boy Computers
> > www.elephantboycomputers.com
> > "Don't Panic!"
> > MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User
>
>
> thelostgeek
> Mr. Malke may be right - your problem may be due to a hardware defect, but I
> really don't think so. At least not until we have more evidence that the
> problem is hardware-related.
>
> So let's start from scratch, OK?
>
> I'm assuming two things at this stage...
> 1. You correctly built your computer, i.e., all of the components were
> correctly installed and they are correctly connected/configured. So that
> when you powered up your computer for the first time after assembly (with no
> operating system having being installed at this time) there were no
> strange/error messages that appeared on your monitor screen. Is that a fair
> assumption?
> I'm a little uneasy over your comment that you & your granddad "formatted
> the BIOS Program". I trust you mean by that that you reviewed the system
> settings of your motherboard's BIOS to ensure their correctness for your
> specific installation. Do I have this right? And you're reasonably sure that
> whatever changes or options you selected were the correct ones, right?
>
> 2. There is no data on your hard drive that you need at this point. I
> mention this because what we are going to do (with your approval) is to
> totally remove whatever contents are presently on that drive and start as if
> the disk is "virgin". Is that OK?
>
> So, if you want to go on, please respond to the above and we'll take it from
> there step-by-step.
> Anna
>
>
> I would like to do that, but let me reinforce the goal of the problem: I have no Operating system. I need to install and boot Windows XP Home Edition
July 10, 2005 9:30:36 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

> "Anna" wrote:
>
>> > thelostgeek wrote:
>> >
>> >> My Grandfather and I are building a computer from scratch. We finished
>> >> the internal stuff. Then we formatted BIOS Program. Finally, we put in
>> >> the Windows XP Home Edition CD with SP 2.I had tried to install
>> >> something, but error occured, so this is my 2nd attempt to install.
>> >> Getting ready starts fine, then comes the menus.
>> >> The first Menu gave me the following options:
>> >> 1. Setting up Windows XP Now
>> >> 2. To repair a Windows XP Installtion using Recovery Console.
>> >> I chose to Set up Win. XP Now
>> >> Then the End-User's licence agreement comes. I do Accept.
>> >> Then it shows my Partitions to choose from. I've got two
>> >>
>> >> C: Partition [NTFS} 76285 MB [76197 Free]
>> >> Unpartioned space 8 MB
>> >> I did not know where the Unpartioned space came from or what it means,
>> >> so I clicked C: Partition.
>> >> I got another menu giving me 3 options
>> >> 1. Format the Partition using the NTFS File System (Quick)
>> >> 2. Format the Partition using the NTFS File System
>> >> 3. Leave the Current File System Intact
>> >> I choose Leaving the Current File System Intact.
>> >> Then Came another menu. There was a Windows Folder installed.
>> >> it gave me two options
>> >> 1. Delete old folder, Make a new one.
>> >> 2. Use Different Folder.
>> >> I choose Deleting the Old folder and making a new one.
>> >> It exmines the Disks and makes a list of files to me copied
>> >> During coping, it shows up numerous times saying that setup cannot
>> >> copy a certain file. It gives me the choice to retry of skip. I Retry.
>> >> Sooner or later in the middle of the coping, a tech error pops up.
>> >> Page_Fault_in_Non-Paged_Area
>>
>>
>> "Malke" <invalid@not-real.com> wrote in message
>> news:%237F3yQkgFHA.4032@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> > Your post is a bit unclear as to exactly what you've done, but mainly
>> > the issue is that your clean install of XPSP2 fails, right? Normally
>> > failures to install an operating system are because of hardware
>> > problems. The RAM you are using may be faulty or marginal, not right
>> > for the motherboard, etc. I would test the RAM and other hardware
>> > components, particularly since you built the machine yourself. Here are
>> > general hardware troubleshooting steps - not everything will apply to
>> > you. I've also included a link to installation instructions for XP:
>> >
>> > 1) Open the computer and run it open, cleaning out all dust bunnies and
>> > observing all fans (overheating will cause system freezing). Obviously
>> > you can't do this with a laptop, but you can hear if the fan is running
>> > and feel if the laptop is getting too hot.
>> >
>> > 2) Test the RAM - I like Memtest86+ from www.memtest.org. Obviously,
>> > you
>> > have to get the program from a working machine. You will either
>> > download the precompiled Windows binary to make a bootable floppy or
>> > the .iso to make a bootable cd. If you want to use the latter, you'll
>> > need to have third-party burning software on the machine where you
>> > download the file - XP's built-in burning capability won't do the job.
>> > In either case, boot with the media you made. The test will run
>> > immediately. Let the test run for an extended period of time - unless
>> > errors are seen immediately. If you get any errors, replace the RAM.
>> >
>> > 3) Test the hard drive with a diagnostic utility from the mftr. Usually
>> > you will download the file and make a bootable floppy with it. Boot
>> > with the media and do a thorough test. If the drive has physical
>> > errors, replace it.
>> >
>> > 4) The power supply may be going bad or be inadequate for the devices
>> > you have in the system. The adequacy issue doesn't really apply to a
>> > laptop, although of course the power
>> > supply can be faulty.
>> >
>> > 5) Test the motherboard with something like TuffTest from
>> > www.tufftest.com. Sometimes this is useful, and sometimes it isn't.
>> >
>> > http://michaelstevenstech.com/cleanxpinstall.html - Clean Install
>> >
>> > Malke
>> > --
>> > Elephant Boy Computers
>> > www.elephantboycomputers.com
>> > "Don't Panic!"
>> > MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User
>>
>>
>> thelostgeek
>> Mr. Malke may be right - your problem may be due to a hardware defect,
>> but I
>> really don't think so. At least not until we have more evidence that the
>> problem is hardware-related.
>>
>> So let's start from scratch, OK?
>>
>> I'm assuming two things at this stage...
>> 1. You correctly built your computer, i.e., all of the components were
>> correctly installed and they are correctly connected/configured. So that
>> when you powered up your computer for the first time after assembly (with
>> no
>> operating system having being installed at this time) there were no
>> strange/error messages that appeared on your monitor screen. Is that a
>> fair
>> assumption?
>> I'm a little uneasy over your comment that you & your granddad "formatted
>> the BIOS Program". I trust you mean by that that you reviewed the system
>> settings of your motherboard's BIOS to ensure their correctness for your
>> specific installation. Do I have this right? And you're reasonably sure
>> that
>> whatever changes or options you selected were the correct ones, right?
>>
>> 2. There is no data on your hard drive that you need at this point. I
>> mention this because what we are going to do (with your approval) is to
>> totally remove whatever contents are presently on that drive and start as
>> if
>> the disk is "virgin". Is that OK?
>>
>> So, if you want to go on, please respond to the above and we'll take it
>> from
>> there step-by-step.
>> Anna


"thelostgeek" <thelostgeek@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:59B7C0B3-3988-4619-8977-6DF57C33EDC9@microsoft.com...
>> I would like to do that, but let me reinforce the goal of the problem: I
>> have no Operating system. I need to install and boot Windows XP Home
>> Edition


lostgeek:
Sorry I haven't responded sooner, but I just came across your latest
response...

Please understand that you do *not* need to install your operating system
before or during the steps I recommended above. The whole point of the
exercise I recommended you follow is to first determine whether there is
*some* basic hardware defect that's causing your inability to install the
OS. I fully understand that your goal is to install a functioning OS.

So, have you follow the steps I recommended?
Anna
!