Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

[IFComp] I Must Play additional game ideas that you might ..

Last response: in Video Games
Share
Anonymous
November 16, 2004 7:24:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

Before the comp I had planned on possibly adding a few more games to "I
Must Play" if it was well received. It wasn't, so I thought that perhaps
people would at least enjoy seeing the list of ideas that otherwise
would just go into /dev/null.


Game 1:
In one game machine you enter and find yourself in a rolling wooden
room. Eventually the room explodes into fire and you die. In the 2nd
game machine you enter and find yourself in a workshop. There you find a
pail of nails. To win you need to pour water over the nails so that they
rust. Then, when you go back to the first machine the barrel will burst
open and you'll find out that you're in Donkey Kong.

Game 2:
You enter one game machine and find yourself in what looks like a
missile silo. In the room there is a huge monster squinting at you. It's
sulking and complains about how there's no point in going outside
because it can't see anything. To win you need to get a monocle from a
limo in a different game, and then you drop the monocle into a hole in
the outside of the game machine. When you enter the game again you'll
find that the monocle is now huge and is the proper size for the
monster. The monster will wear the monocle and will then leave out the
top of the missile silo. You then leave the game and hit the mole over
the head to win Whack-A-Mole.

Game 3:
You enter one game machine and find yourself in a barren hallway with
solid colored walls. You leave one side and find a room with blue walls.
You go the other way and find an empty room with a dot on the floor in
the center. It looks like the dot is just painted on the ground, but
it's an actual object you can pick up. If you go to the blue room again
then one of the walls is now gray (the same color as the floor). You can
now walk through that wall and enter a room where you can read an
inscription on the floor to win Atari Adventure.

Game 4:
You enter one game machine and find yourself in a long hallway with gray
walls, a gray ceiling, and a solid red floor. Occasionally you feel
earthquakes that shake everything violently. If you stick around long
enough, a crack forms in one panel of one floor. If you are above that
crack when it goes then you will be crushed by the huge sphere that
flies up from beneath. Otherwise you just witness a sphere flying
through the shattered floor and bouncing down again. You can watch from
the edge and see it fall into oblivion. At that point you lose the game.
To win, you need to bring dynamite into the game and blow up all the
floors except the cracked one. The result is that you will win Breakout
as soon as the sphere hits that last brick (which is safe to stand on
because the game ends the moment that the brick is shattered and before
the sphere flies through).
Anonymous
November 17, 2004 3:55:00 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

"Fortytwo" <news2@g42DOTorg> wrote in message news:419a9aaa$1_1@127.0.0.1...
> Before the comp I had planned on possibly adding a few more games to "I
> Must Play" if it was well received. It wasn't, so I thought that perhaps
> people would at least enjoy seeing the list of ideas that otherwise
> would just go into /dev/null.

In my game I considered writing an IF version of Defender for the arcade. You
would be told what ships were nearby, and have to consider the timing of your
movements as well as the resource management (e.g. smart bombs).

But in the end I didn't think anyone would think this was very fun. I made the
random description generator instead.

In hindsight I suspect there's much potential for humor in an IF rendition of
Defender.

Kevin Venzke
Anonymous
November 17, 2004 3:55:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

I'm putting this at the top because a critical aspect of these things is
discovering which game it is that you're playing:

You enter the game through one machine and find yourself in the robotics
department of MIT. Shortly after you arrive, one of the geeks there
starts shyly talking to a girl. If you do nothing then the geek goes out
with the girl, gets married, and you lose the game. To win the game you
need to sabotage their relationship so that the girl hates the geek. The
result is that the geek gets depressed and dives into his work and ends
up creating a fantastic new robot that looks just like a human. Once you
have that robot you can mass produce thousands of these robots and put
bombs in them. Then, have them walk around in crowds. When the aliens
attack a city and start turning people into monsters then, at some
point, every ship will pick up one of the robots (just by pure chance)
and get blown up. That is how you win Defender.


Kevin Venzke wrote:
> In my game I considered writing an IF version of Defender for the arcade. You
> would be told what ships were nearby, and have to consider the timing of your
> movements as well as the resource management (e.g. smart bombs).
>
> But in the end I didn't think anyone would think this was very fun.

Yep. For the most part, I suspect that it just isn't fun to play literal
IF adaptations of video games. All the visual information that is
normally instantly understandable ends up having to be described
laboriously in text. Humor and nostalgia tweaking is definitely the way
to go.

> I made the
> random description generator instead.
>
> In hindsight I suspect there's much potential for humor in an IF rendition of
> Defender.
>
> Kevin Venzke

Absolutely! Hmm, Defender was a game where you had to destroy attacking
aliens before they picked up humans from the ground and mutated them.
That's the crux of the game description I put at the top of this
message. What do you think? Feel free to come up with something better.
I'd really enjoy reading descriptions like these which are written by
other people. There's no surprise when I read text that I wrote myself.
*smile*
Related resources
Anonymous
November 17, 2004 8:14:22 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

Stargate was better.
Anonymous
November 17, 2004 8:16:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

In article <419a9aaa$1_1@127.0.0.1>, Fortytwo <news2@g42DOTorg> wrote:
>Game 3:
>You can
>now walk through that wall and enter a room where you can read an
>inscription on the floor to win Atari Adventure.

You do realize, of course, that finding the Easter Egg is not winning,
right? Bringing the Chalice to the Golden Castle is winning.

Adam
Anonymous
November 17, 2004 8:16:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

Adam Thornton wrote:
> In article <419a9aaa$1_1@127.0.0.1>, Fortytwo <news2@g42DOTorg> wrote:
>
>>Game 3:
>>You can
>>now walk through that wall and enter a room where you can read an
>>inscription on the floor to win Atari Adventure.
>
>
> You do realize, of course, that finding the Easter Egg is not winning,
> right? Bringing the Chalice to the Golden Castle is winning.
>
> Adam

Really? Actually, I didn't even realize that it was a winnable game.
After reading about the Easter Egg I downloaded an emulator so I could
try the game out to see what it was like. I played it for a bit and I
got the impression that the game was endless (like so many games of that
era) and that each level was either randomly generated or reused in
later levels (but with different wall colors). I guess not! How many
levels were there? I guess there probably weren't more than 8 since I
think that's how many colors the Atari had.
Anonymous
November 17, 2004 9:06:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

In article <419ae8a7$1_2@127.0.0.1>, Fortytwo <news2@g42DOTorg> wrote:
>Really? Actually, I didn't even realize that it was a winnable game.
>After reading about the Easter Egg I downloaded an emulator so I could
>try the game out to see what it was like. I played it for a bit and I
>got the impression that the game was endless (like so many games of that
>era) and that each level was either randomly generated or reused in
>later levels (but with different wall colors). I guess not! How many
>levels were there? I guess there probably weren't more than 8 since I
>think that's how many colors the Atari had.

The Atari has 128 colors.

There are three games in Adventure. The first game has just the Black
and the Gold castles, and the Blue Maze.

The second adds the White Castle, a limited-visibility maze south and
east of the Gold Castle, another limited-visibility maze inside the
Black Castle (where the Magic Dot is), a maze inside the White Castle,
and another several rooms.

The third has the same physical layout as the second, but the item and
creature locations are randomized.

And all this fits in 4K of ROM; there's also 128 bytes of RAM in the
console.

Adam
Anonymous
November 18, 2004 12:41:37 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

"A.P. Hill" <aphill@altavista.com> wrote in message
news:61188078.0411170514.1bc76a@posting.google.com...
> Stargate was better.

Yeah, I think so too, on the whole. But if I recall, there was one kind of
enemy
in it that moved so fast, and was so intent on colliding with me, that it ruined
a bit
my enthusiasm for it.

Kevin Venzke
!