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Computer Crashes When Playing Games

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Last response: in Windows 7
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September 10, 2012 12:14:49 AM

Hi this problem has nearly ruined me and cost a fortune so far, first I'll explain the problem about 6 months ago I had a PSU blow out on me, so I replaced it and all was well for a time when the PC would shut down and then restart without even showing a BSOD, at first it was now and then but gradually got worse. At first I thought it might of been the CPU overheating, I also thought that when the PSU blew it caused damage to the MB. So over a period of time I have ended up replacing all the hardware. For a time it seemed okay but the problem soon returned. (just to note it only shuts down when playing or starting games, I can surf the net or play videos etc without a problem).

My next thought was that it was a software conflict so I have ended up rebuilding a second PC, with a new HDD just incase it was a virus etc, I've loaded Windows 7 (home) 32bit, installed the graphics card (GeForce 560 Ti) with latest Nvidia drivers and a Asus sound card. I then installed Minecraft just as a test game and sure enough it crashes.

So I have eliminated the possibility of it being a hardware problem or a software conflict. I then thought it may of been the graphic card drivers so I uninstalled the latest driver and installed a older driver, but the problem remaines.

Whilst trying to check detals of my system, I noticed that the "Windows Experiance Index" score was only 1.0 whereas in the past it's always around 5.something, so being a new install I cliked on the "Refresh Now" button the test starts but when it gets to "Direct 3D 9 Texture Load Assessment" the system crashes as if I was playing a game. I then realise that I can not use the Windows Aero desktop as the experiance score is so low needs to be 3.0 or higher.

When I have looked at the Events Log I notice when the system crashes it reports "41 Kernal power" etc I've looked at the Microsoft website but dissmissed their explanations as the powersupply I have is new and powerfull enough.

I have searched the internet for days now without getting any answers I have tried upping the power for the CPU and ram but made no difference. So Toms Hardware forums is my last chance to get this sorted. I have come to the thought that theres something within Windows 7 that detects when huge amounts of graphics are being shifted and cant cope so it shuts down. As I stated this is on two different Asus MB's and Intel i5's.

It has me stumped, please help before I smash the lot up. (and god bless you Mr Gates).

:cry: 
a c 365 $ Windows 7
September 10, 2012 4:33:12 PM

Did you replace the video card? You said replaced the hardware, how about the video card?

Form what you posted, if you tried different video drivers and motherboards, RAM, etc.., it's the video card that's causing issues. As long as the power supply you are using is good enough to run the card.
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September 10, 2012 4:48:04 PM

Airflow inside the case springs to mind as well.
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a b $ Windows 7
September 10, 2012 4:58:11 PM

What power supply have you gotten as a replacement?

To me this really sounds like a PSU issue still. It maybe worth calling the new PSU manufacturer about an RMA; because even good brand supplies are sometimes bad out of the box or fail prematurely.
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September 10, 2012 8:26:26 PM

Hi,

Thanks for the replies,

The video card was the first thing I changed, I've installed a Gainward Geforce GTX 560 Ti.

The PSU is a Antec HCP 750w, which I installed some months back so it's a bit late to RMA it.

I have just installed a new CPU cooling fan, better than the previous one, I've checked for dust and all other fans are running.

I have tried to stress test the CPU with IntelBurnTest, it ran on the standard test but when I tried to run it on the High or Very High test I got an error message stating it couldn't run. I will try and upload a image.



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September 10, 2012 8:35:38 PM

what size & how many case fans? I had to demote my beloved lian-li quiet case to HTPC because the two 80mm intake and 1 80mm exhaust weren't cutting it for the gaming rig anymore (after nearly 8 years). machine was overheating like crazy.
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a b $ Windows 7
September 11, 2012 9:55:37 PM

Most PSU's have a warranty period of a few years or more (newegg lists yours with a 5 year warranty), if you haven't checked, it's worth doing. However, the heat is another thing to check out that doesn't involve shipping and waiting :) 
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September 26, 2012 1:40:01 PM

[SOLVED]

Thanks to all that responded, after much head scratching I replaced the ANTEC PSU with a cheap Chinese made PSU and bang problem solved with a stable system again.

Just shows buying expensive PSU's doesn't always guarantee stable performance, hence the ANTEC is being sent back to the retailers.

Thanks again.

:sol: 
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a b $ Windows 7
September 26, 2012 4:33:33 PM

Any piece of hardware can fail, no matter how much you spend. A good PSU has protections in place to fail safely without damaging components, has voltage outputs that are well within ATX specifications, and able to supply it's rated power level continuosly and efficiently.

A cheap power supply is probably more likely to fail, more likely to damage components and/or catch on fire when it does fail, more likely to have out of spec voltage output, and is more likely to be unable to meet it's output rating.

It's totally possible that you get lucky, and you'll run this PSU for several years without issue, just like it's possible for a good PSU to fail.
I hope it works out for you, but I would never recommend doing what you are doing.
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September 26, 2012 4:56:56 PM

djscribbles said:
Any piece of hardware can fail, no matter how much you spend. A good PSU has protections in place to fail safely without damaging components, has voltage outputs that are well within ATX specifications, and able to supply it's rated power level continuosly and efficiently.

A cheap power supply is probably more likely to fail, more likely to damage components and/or catch on fire when it does fail, more likely to have out of spec voltage output, and is more likely to be unable to meet it's output rating.

It's totally possible that you get lucky, and you'll run this PSU for several years without issue, just like it's possible for a good PSU to fail.
I hope it works out for you, but I would never recommend doing what you are doing.


+1

Any PSU can be bad from the factory, or go bad later on. The difference is in what they do when they decide to go. A quality PSU is always recommended before any other part in a computer for this reason...since a bad one can take out your whole system.

I'd recommend a Seasonic, PC Power & Cooling, or Enermax. Those are the few brands that come to mind whose quality is top-notch.

Good luck, whatever you choose.
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September 29, 2012 11:41:27 AM

When I said cheap should have said cheaper the PSU I used to replace the Antec was a Powercool which worked out of the box and has made my system stable again, don't know much about the makers but seems okay.

BTW I sent the Antec back to Scan computers and they they put it on test for 24hrs and can't find a fault (don't want to make a refund more like it). So I've told them to test it longer as it is an intermittant fault, and thinking about it unless they use the exact setup as I have then there tests can't be considered comprehensive. Me thinks I will have a battle on my hands, and will need to brush up on my consumer rights.

:pt1cable: 
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September 29, 2012 2:25:26 PM

airhopper said:
[SOLVED]

Thanks to all that responded, after much head scratching I replaced the ANTEC PSU with a cheap Chinese made PSU and bang problem solved with a stable system again.

Just shows buying expensive PSU's doesn't always guarantee stable performance, hence the ANTEC is being sent back to the retailers.

Thanks again.

:sol: 


Hi - glad it's fixed. However, u should def thnk about replacing that "cheap Chinese made PSU" when u can afford to do so.

Tom
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