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Do LCDs 'Burn-in'?

Last response: in Computer Peripherals
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April 21, 2007 12:12:40 AM

Hello!

I just bought a LG L1933TR-SF monitor. The quick specs are:

19 inch - 1280X1024
3000:1 Contrast DFC (I am not sure what the true is, around 1000)
2ms G to G

When I first got it, the monitor looked beautiful. However, later that day I noticed that there was a bright spot in the bottom right hand corner. It wasn't bad enough for return, but it did bother me.
The next day, though, I noticed it was gone for a while but came back later that day again.
On the third day, it was gone again and has been gone for the last few days. So, what do you guys think, has the montor just 'burned in', or does this have a good chance of recurring? What causes light spots in LCDs anyway? Especially non-permanent ones like this?

Thanks in advance!

(Now all I need is a 2900XT and my comp will be awesome again!)

More about : lcds burn

April 21, 2007 12:51:36 AM

LCD's do not suffer from burn-in
April 21, 2007 1:09:37 AM

Sorry, I didn't mean burn in as in the way CRTs did (an image physically burned on the screen.) I meant, do they take a while to begin working properly, do they vary in displayed image while they are new, or will my problem possibly recur (is my monitor possibly defective)?
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April 21, 2007 1:49:39 AM

Make sure you are using DVI cable, and that is is secured firmly.

No that does not sound normal.
April 21, 2007 3:40:00 AM

Quote:
LCD's do not suffer from burn-in


Actually, some sort-of do. Google "LCD image persistence"
April 23, 2007 8:12:48 AM

too much overdrive causes LCD image persistence ...eh i mean "burn in" .

oh no, "LCD image persistance"... makes me think of "image retention" - occular ghosting, which by the way isn't related to true LCD GHOSTING (more correctly called "pixel SMEARING"...LETS CALL IT SCREEN LAG....you know, that lag not related to LCD INPUT LAG) doh.. :cry: 
April 23, 2007 4:45:55 PM

Quote:
Sorry, I didn't mean burn in as in the way CRTs did (an image physically burned on the screen.) I meant, do they take a while to begin working properly, do they vary in displayed image while they are new, or will my problem possibly recur (is my monitor possibly defective)?


I think the correct expression you are looking for is "break-in" (aka car engines that need a break-in period)
April 23, 2007 5:29:23 PM

Quote:
"... I meant, do they take a while to begin working properly..."/quote]

No. They work properly right away. The "burn in" is a function of "higher voltage to force pixels to turn faster" (aka. "overdrive")... when that voltage is applied continuously, the image created may persist.

As a general rule, montors with < 16ms response time have some degree of overdrive, and are therefore suseptible to image persistance... however, some theoretically susceptible monitors will show it while others do not.
April 23, 2007 8:41:40 PM

Quote:
I think the correct expression you are looking for is "break-in"
Break-in's probably better in this example however a CPU, for example, has a so-called burn-in period. Maybe you need to burn in a panel before you can over-clock (overdrive) it, lol ;) 
April 23, 2007 8:50:30 PM

yeah you're right... lol

For CPU however if you use the "burn-in" expression, there's little chance it will be confused with the "burn-in" effect that CRTs have.

I remember when Nintendo became popular... Old TVs would end up with a shadow of games while you watched tv if you played games that had a static picture for extended periods of time.
April 24, 2007 7:09:28 AM

CRTs have problems with strong magnetic fields (like when the speakers are too close to the screen) but i never heard of LCDs reacting to magnetic fields. dont see why not. could be a backlighting issue? cheers
April 25, 2007 4:37:17 PM

Quote:
dont see why not.


AFAIK, the CRT acts like a gun, shooting electrons through a mask and thus a magnetic field might affect the path, etc.

But hey, I'm extrapolating from stuff I read ages ago, so take it with a grain of salt. Or two...
May 2, 2007 4:50:39 AM

Yes, LCDs do suffer from image retention, which is the most widely used term in the industry. Some also refer to it as image sticking and also temporary image persistence.
LCDs for the most part are correctable, unlike that of CRT and Plasma displays. Image retention has improved greatly over the last two years. It has been more easily seen with VA/MVA technologies. Most of the TN panels shipping today rarely show this problem, unless it's from a cheapo panel supplier. But then TN panels are cheapo panels to begin with...but that's another subject.
The severity differs between panels (same part#), panel suppliers, and panel technologies. There are two general ways to get rid of it, both of which take time. Suppliers can't agree on which method is the best. Most widely used method is just to use full white screen pattern at max contrast and max brightness for double the amount of time it took to burn-in image. The other method is a flashing fast on/off full screen white/black patterns for double amount of time it took to burn-in image.
Most of the big monitor companies should have some kind of write-up on image retention on their websites, including even Dell and HP.
I think HP still has a utility that helps with this issue with a pretty good white paper that comes with it. Look up 'LCD First-Aid' on HP website.
NEC Displays website has the best whitepapers hands down though:
http://www.necdisplay.com/SupportCenter/Monitors/TechLi...
Enjoy.
May 3, 2007 1:28:10 PM

Quote:
Yes, LCDs do suffer from image retention, which is the most widely used term in the industry. ... NEC Displays website has the best whitepapers hands down though:
http://www.necdisplay.com/SupportCenter/Monitors/TechLi...

Hey, thanks, MonitorDude :)  Will certainly look into the subject! Just a quick question, though: how long does it take to burn in an image on an LCD panel? I'm asking for a ballpark figure, of course (days, months...).
May 3, 2007 1:32:49 PM

Quote:
Yes, LCDs do suffer from image retention, which is the most widely used term in the industry. ... NEC Displays website has the best whitepapers hands down though:
http://www.necdisplay.com/SupportCenter/Monitors/TechLi...

"... how long does it take to burn in an image on an LCD panel? I'm asking for a ballpark figure, of course (days, months...).

May not occur at all, may take days/weeks? I got a new monitor and it warned "not to leave a stagnant image more than 12 hours".
!