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Out of memory errors with a ridiculous page-file usage...

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September 12, 2012 12:49:05 PM

I have been using Windows 7 for quite some while (2 or more weeks) on this new PC. Now...problem is, Task Manager shows a massive page-file usage. 1.40 GB used as soon as my PC starts (without loading any programs). I have 4 GB RAM, out of which, 3305 MB is usable (Microsoft licensing issues keep messing around with 32-bit Windows), and the page-file usage slowly gets to around 3 GB. I have 4 partitions on my 1 TB HDD, and I had 2-4 GB page-file on each. I disabled the page-files on all the partitions, but TM still shows a massive usage of 2.5 GB as I am writing this article. I mean, there's 4 GB RAM, and even without running any programs, it's still around 1.40 GB page-file usage.

I disabled Superfetch and the page-file on all the drives, now Windows is giving me out-of-memory errors. The only things open are Google Chrome, Windows Live Messenger, mIRC, Windows Media Player, Task Manager, Yahoo Messenger and Bit-Torrent, and none eat memory. TM is showing 710 MB RAM available out of 3304 MB, and 70 MB free. IDK what is using the RAM and causing this big a page-file usage. My PC is gone very slow, and it sucks. Any way to reduce this much disk-activity, and actually use the RAM? Nothing in the TM shows active (CPU is always at 0-5 %), so nothing is eating memory. What's causing this much RAM and page-file usage?
a b $ Windows 7
September 12, 2012 1:14:57 PM

Well... ah, try turning back on your paging file and that should get rid of the out of memory errors. A page file is necessary for most people with less than 8-12gb of ram.

Correct me if I'm wrong here guys but doesn't windows also put things in pagefile when they aren't needed right away?

if you have a few tbs of data why do you mind having that low of a pagefile? I set mine to around 4gb.
a c 215 $ Windows 7
September 12, 2012 3:46:54 PM

Some programs require a page file and will crash without one. Why not just set up a page file on one drive and instead of letting windows manage it, set it to a fixed size. You can do this by setting the minimum and maximum size as the same size. 2Gb should be plenty.
Related resources
September 12, 2012 4:06:34 PM

4gigs of RAM isn't very much. If you had a 64bit OS, you could add more ram and help eliminate or reduce the pagefile. Why do you have a pagefile on all the partitions? CPU utilization has nothing to do with memory usage.

go to task manager and choose the process tab. Click View and select columns. Choose Memory private working sets and Memory working sets. Make sure they are selected. go back to the processes tab and click sort by private working set and take a screenshot and post it.


here's some tips

http://lifehacker.com/5426041/understanding-the-windows...
a b $ Windows 7
September 12, 2012 4:08:32 PM

Seriously - stop messing about...
Win 7 is very good at managing its page files and if you start saying you know best... you are asking for trouble...esp as you dont really seem to know what youare doing... gone are the days where you helped by setting your page file fixed at 1.5x your memory.

Win 7 gives you good tools to track what mem is being used by which processes... so if you really think you using to much mem... solve the problem (whats using the mem) and dont solve the symptom (large page file).

Cheers
September 12, 2012 4:09:19 PM

The 32-bit architecture has a memory access limit of 4GB (2^32 bytes). This permits you to use about 2.75-3.5GB of RAM after IO reservations are factored in.

You may want to perform an inventory of what's installed on your current rig and possibly install a 64-bit version. Please note that any 32-bit driver will not work within a 64-bit OS but you can install a 32-bit application within a 64-bit OS. You will also have to format your system drive and then perform a fresh install of the 64-bit OS.

If you ever decide to add more RAM, you will have no choice but to go the 64-bit route.
a b $ Windows 7
September 12, 2012 4:11:40 PM

yoji said:
Seriously - stop messing about...
Win 7 is very good at managing its page files and if you start saying you know best... you are asking for trouble...esp as you dont really seem to know what youare doing... gone are the days where you helped by setting your page file fixed at 1.5x your memory.

Win 7 gives you good tools to track what mem is being used by which processes... so if you really think you using to much mem... solve the problem (whats using the mem) and dont solve the symptom (large page file).

Cheers


+1 to that.
September 12, 2012 4:44:25 PM

OK...first of all, Yoji, I have experience with Windows, so I know what's best and what's not, and I can mess around with my OWN PC...I only ask about things I don't know. And therefore...since I don't know what's using the RAM, I can't eliminate it. If I could look in TM, I wouldn't ask here.

Also, I know that PF is needed, but I have disabled it so I can rectify the problem...as I said, a ridiculous 1.4 GB usage for the PF in Task Manager. Resource Monitor shows 1800 MB of RAM in use, 792 for Hardware Reserved, around 140-150 MB modified, and much less than 1 GB free, out of 3.23 GB...I don't know what's causing such big memory usage, and such big PF usage. I want to reduce PF usage, since it's making the PC slow, but I need to rectify the problem for that. So, can anyone help me with finding out something which eats RAM but shows nothing in TM?
a c 215 $ Windows 7
September 12, 2012 4:48:03 PM

Run the resource monitor and go to the memory tab. It will show what's eating up your ram.
September 12, 2012 4:54:54 PM

There's 5 columns here: Hard Faults/second, Commit (KB), Working Set (KB), Shareable (KB) and Private (KB)...which one do I look for?
a c 215 $ Windows 7
September 12, 2012 5:55:59 PM

Private and working set are the two to look at.

Private Bytes refer to the amount of memory that the process executable has asked for - not necessarily the amount it is actually using. They are "private" because they (usually) exclude memory-mapped files (i.e. shared DLLs). But - here's the catch - they don't necessarily exclude memory allocated by those files. There is no way to tell whether a change in private bytes was due to the executable itself, or due to a linked library. Private bytes are also not exclusively physical memory; they can be paged to disk or in the standby page list (i.e. no longer in use, but not paged yet either).

Working Set refers to the total physical memory (RAM) used by the process. However, unlike private bytes, this also includes memory-mapped files and various other resources, so it's an even less accurate measurement than the private bytes. This is the same value that gets reported in Task Manager's "Mem Usage" and has been the source of endless amounts of confusion in recent years. Memory in the Working Set is "physical" in the sense that it can be addressed without a page fault; however, the standby page list is also still physically in memory but not reported in the Working Set, and this is why you might see the "Mem Usage" suddenly drop when you minimize an application.

Virtual Bytes are the total virtual address space occupied by the entire process. This is like the working set, in the sense that it includes memory-mapped files (shared DLLs), but it also includes data in the standby list and data that has already been paged out and is sitting in a pagefile on disk somewhere. The total virtual bytes used by every process on a system under heavy load will add up to significantly more memory than the machine actually has.

So the relationships are:

Private Bytes are what your app has actually allocated, but include pagefile usage;
Working Set is the non-paged Private Bytes plus memory-mapped files;
Virtual Bytes are the Working Set plus paged Private Bytes and standby list.
a b $ Windows 7
September 12, 2012 6:38:01 PM

amnesiaaisenma said:
I have 4 partitions on my 1 TB HDD, and I had 2-4 GB page-file on each. I disabled the page-files on all the partitions, but TM still shows a massive usage of 2.5 GB as I am writing this article.


Having a pagefile on each partition of a multi-partition hard drive is stupid, it will really slow your hard drive down when it tries to access/update them. At most you should only have one pagefile on a hard drive, preferably on the first partition on the hard drive so it gives best performance when Windows needs to access it.
a c 215 $ Windows 7
September 12, 2012 7:31:36 PM

^ E-gads, I didn't catch the part about 4 partitions. This would definately cause excessive head thrashing and decrease performance.
September 12, 2012 8:58:58 PM

OK...so, now, since the relationship between things is established...how do I find out what is using the most RAM? Which exact column to look for? Looking from your post, Private seems accurate, and since I don't have a page-file, it would be the one...IDK, though.

Also, yea, it may be stupid, but I had the same HDD running on an older PC before, and having 4 PFs on 4 partitions wasn't stupid, since my system was fast enough. And the PF wasn't being used back then...it's only on this new PC that the problem has appeared.
September 12, 2012 9:02:03 PM

Try modifying the msconfig file.
Run > msconfg > System Config > Boot > Advanced Options

Look for the Maximum Memory option and place a tick mark in the box, it should apply the entire system memory and reset.

I did the above on my netbook and freed up over 250MB of RAM (only 3GB installed and 1.99 useable).

Hope this helps...

a b $ Windows 7
September 12, 2012 9:09:25 PM

amnesiaaisenma said:
OK...so, now, since the relationship between things is established...how do I find out what is using the most RAM? Which exact column to look for? Looking from your post, Private seems accurate, and since I don't have a page-file, it would be the one...IDK, though.

Also, yea, it may be stupid, but I had the same HDD running on an older PC before, and having 4 PFs on 4 partitions wasn't stupid, since my system was fast enough. And the PF wasn't being used back then...it's only on this new PC that the problem has appeared.


I thought you knew how to use windows and what was best, and yet you can't figure out how to tell what's using what?
September 12, 2012 9:37:36 PM

I also said that I only ask what I don't know, so...
September 12, 2012 9:44:32 PM

amnesiaaisenma said:
I also said that I only ask what I don't know, so...


Still waiting for that screenshot of taskmanager processes that are running.

How many HDD's do you have running and what is their cache size? What is the Ram size on your video card? all that takes away for the usable amount of ram that a 32bit OS can use.
a b $ Windows 7
September 12, 2012 11:42:35 PM

amnesiaaisenma said:
I also said that I only ask what I don't know, so...



Hi :) 

Dont you get it yet.... its WINDOWS using that ram because YOU set it up incorrectly...

All the best Brett :) 
September 13, 2012 12:04:04 AM

I had set up Windows 7 TWICE before this one, exactly as this one, on a much worse PC than this was...and it performed flawlessly. So I don't see how can I be in-correct, since it was set EXACTLY as this PC is.
September 13, 2012 12:15:28 AM

Simple problem, simple solution. For some mysterious reason you have partitioned a single HDD in 4 parts (which is pointless) and then you've split the page across said four partitions (which is even more pointless and never recommended). Turn off the page file, reboot, then turn it on automatically. Personally I'd reinstall Windows and use a single partition. Then I'd double the RAM. Every single PC/laptop should be using 8GB of RAM in 2012. No excuses.
September 13, 2012 12:19:08 AM

amnesiaaisenma said:
The TM list is too long for a screenshot...very long. And I have 2 HDD:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.geeks.com/details.asp?invtid=WD10EARX

And my graphic card is ATI Radeon HD 7950, 3 GB DDR5.


Really? Too long? you think that might be the problem? I have 58 processes running, if you have more than that something is wrong with your processes you have running in the background. Obviously you have too much stuff starting up with windows. Post two screen shots if that's what it takes.
September 13, 2012 12:22:57 AM

Smeg45 said:
Simple problem, simple solution. For some mysterious reason you have partitioned a single HDD in 4 parts (which is pointless) and then you've split the page across said four partitions (which is even more pointless and never recommended). Turn off the page file, reboot, then turn it on automatically. Personally I'd reinstall Windows and use a single partition. Then I'd double the RAM. Every single PC/laptop should be using 8GB of RAM in 2012. No excuses.



I agree...except he bought a 32bit version of Windows7, and not a 64bit version. :non: 
September 13, 2012 12:34:38 AM

Pointless for you...but when Windows crashes, all the data is gonna' be lost. The 320 GB Hitachi HDD is a back-up HDD, and the 1 TB is the main HDD. I have made 4 partitions with some point for me...maybe pointless for you, but not for me. As far as using 32-bit goes, well, I use 32-bit for compatibility issues. And if a PC SHOULD need 8 GB of RAM, then I'd say it's a waste. Why do I need 4 GB of RAM? You know how expensive it is here? And didn't I mention so many times, that the older PC performed with the same load and was so much faster than this one is? That had the exact same amount of load, exact same amount of RAM, exact same HDD and exact same OS...so I don't think why would 8 GB of RAM be a NECESSITY in the first place? Maybe YOUR PC can't run without 8 GB, but mine used to run, and even now, it should run.

Old PC vs the new PC:
ASUS P5KPL AM/PS vs ASUS Sabertooth X79
Intel Core2Duo E5200 @ 2.5 GHz vs Intel Core i7 3960X @ 3.3 GHz
ATI Radeon HD 7950
Generic 4 GB DDR2 RAM @ 1333 MHz vs Kingston 4GB DDR-3 RAM @ 1600 MHz

And the old PC was lightning fast. But it's fried now, so I can't use that one. It had the same loads, so why is the newer and better PC running worse?
September 13, 2012 12:42:17 AM

Let windows manage the ram and quit screwing around with paging files. The paging file is created to free up ram. The more crap you have running, the bigger that file is going to get.
September 13, 2012 1:04:31 AM

You really have 149 processes running? 91% ram used? Think messing around with the paging file has something to do with that? What was the last Windows OS you used? Windows 98? Windows 7 is very good at managing memory. The problem is the owner of the PC
September 13, 2012 1:05:14 AM

We can't see the amount of memory each program is using, In the view section of task manager click on Select Columns then make sure just Image Name, Memory - Private Working Set, and User Name are checked for screenshot purposes.
Again sorry but you need to retake those pictures.

It's probably a process or two that has a massive memory leak.
September 13, 2012 1:24:44 AM

amnesiaaisenma said:
And didn't I mention so many times, that the older PC performed with the same load and was so much faster than this one is? That had the exact same amount of load, exact same amount of RAM, exact same HDD and exact same OS...so I don't think why would 8 GB of RAM be a NECESSITY in the first place?


Dude, egilbe...really, you need to read twice before posting. The last OS I ran before this one was Windows 7. The problem is me? Please, do enlighten me..since I did set up Windows EXACTLY THE SAME WAY on the previous installation on the old PC...

As for the screenshot, I'm posting only the first screen, sorted as you can see in the picture.

http://tinypic.com/r/1zp4i2g/6
September 13, 2012 1:33:26 AM

There's no way chrome should be using that many resources.
September 13, 2012 1:35:49 AM

The problem is the simple amount of processes you have running. Even though they're all between 20-50megs, There is SO many of them that they eat up all your RAM. With a pagefile windows allocates extra resources into the pagefile for faster loading regardless of the hard-drive speed, sometimes this may slow things down as in your case.

Only solution that i'm seeing is to start using a 64-bit OS and upgrade the RAM. You said there was compatibility problems however, but with which applications?
Personally I have never come across a program that would not run in 64-bit Windows.
September 13, 2012 1:43:41 AM

I know, that so many tabs open eat memory...but when I start up the PC, with no processes running, the PF usage is 1.40 GB, and RAM usage is 1800 MB. NO programs running, and yet the usage.That's what bothers me, that if there's no programs running, then why is the RAM and the PF being used in the first place? I have no problem with a program using it if I am using the program...but starting the system...a brand-new reboot eating up RAM and the PF? That's ridiculous.

And the main use I have is playing games, so games like GTA SA and others won't run in 64-bit...newer games might, but older games won't. Also, RAM is very expensive, so I can't buy any, so ultimately, no use upgrading to x64. But I don't think the need should be. I know, I sound like a broken record by saying that the old PC used to run faster, but I need to...if the basic PC can run Windows 7 a lightning speed, this faster, latest and brand-new PC should run it even more smoothly.
September 13, 2012 1:44:51 AM

I only have 47 processes running on a fresh restart, using 2GB of RAM off the start. Sorry to say but it is what it is. No errors of any sort, just 4GB of RAM just can't cut it for your usage.
September 13, 2012 2:04:02 AM

Hi there. Read through the thread and noticed a thing or two.

So, you ran windows 7 32 bit in the old pc and all was well, but now your new pc (also with windows 7 32 bit) has a
ton of missing memory? what gpu was in your old system? integrated? discrete? how much memory was on the
discrete or allocated to the integrated? Since 32 bit windows has a hard limit of 4GB that can be allocated to any
memory in the system(system ram, video memory, bios, etc) I am thinking maybe your new 3GB HD7950 has
3GB of your max 4GB allocated to it, leaving less than 1GB left over between system ram etc. I don't know
what special software or hardware is requiring 32 bit compatibility, but get over it and install windows 64 bit. Home
Premium limits you to 16GB of system ram(I think it is 128GB for enterprise/business, pro, ultimate, or whatever
costs more than basic and home) and maybe a virtually unlimited amount of vram on top of that. Your 4GB of
ram may end up feeling much snappier(since you will finally be able to use all of it) and if you upgrade to
8GB of ram(depending on your more intense workloads), you may not need a page file at all. Windows will use
left over physical memory to cache frequently used programs you aren't currently using and not need to use
the hard drive to for extra virtual memory/page file at all.
September 13, 2012 2:10:59 AM

jtenorj said:
Hi there. Read through the thread and noticed a thing or two.

So, you ran windows 7 32 bit in the old pc and all was well, but now your new pc (also with windows 7 32 bit) has a
ton of missing memory? what gpu was in your old system? integrated? discrete? how much memory was on the
discrete or allocated to the integrated? Since 32 bit windows has a hard limit of 4GB that can be allocated to any
memory in the system(system ram, video memory, bios, etc) I am thinking maybe your new 3GB HD7950 has
3GB of your max 4GB allocated to it
, leaving less than 1GB left over between system ram etc. I don't know
what special software or hardware is requiring 32 bit compatibility, but get over it and install windows 64 bit. Home
Premium limits you to 16GB of system ram(I think it is 128GB for enterprise/business, pro, ultimate, or whatever
costs more than basic and home) and maybe a virtually unlimited amount of vram on top of that. Your 4GB of
ram may end up feeling much snappier(since you will finally be able to use all of it) and if you upgrade to
8GB of ram(depending on your more intense workloads), you may not need a page file at all. Windows will use
left over physical memory to cache frequently used programs you aren't currently using and not need to use
the hard drive to for extra virtual memory/page file at all.


If that card wasn't in the old system, then yeah, probably that's it.
September 13, 2012 2:20:20 AM

32 bit OS's can only address 2^32 bit addresses. That includes all the memory in your pc, HDD caches, DVD-rom cache, video card ram, BIOS and CPU cache. The main benefit of a 64bit OS is that when you put 4 gigs of ram in your pc, you have 4 gigs available for programs and OS. 64 bit OS has 2^64 bit addresses that's available (theoretically) any limitations below that are written into the OS itself.
September 13, 2012 2:45:22 AM

amnesiaaisenma said:
Pointless for you...but when Windows crashes, all the data is gonna' be lost. The 320 GB Hitachi HDD is a back-up HDD, and the 1 TB is the main HDD. I have made 4 partitions with some point for me...maybe pointless for you, but not for me. As far as using 32-bit goes, well, I use 32-bit for compatibility issues. And if a PC SHOULD need 8 GB of RAM, then I'd say it's a waste. Why do I need 4 GB of RAM? You know how expensive it is here? And didn't I mention so many times, that the older PC performed with the same load and was so much faster than this one is? That had the exact same amount of load, exact same amount of RAM, exact same HDD and exact same OS...so I don't think why would 8 GB of RAM be a NECESSITY in the first place? Maybe YOUR PC can't run without 8 GB, but mine used to run, and even now, it should run.

Old PC vs the new PC:
ASUS P5KPL AM/PS vs ASUS Sabertooth X79
Intel Core2Duo E5200 @ 2.5 GHz vs Intel Core i7 3960X @ 3.3 GHz
ATI Radeon HD 7950
Generic 4 GB DDR2 RAM @ 1333 MHz vs Kingston 4GB DDR-3 RAM @ 1600 MHz

And the old PC was lightning fast. But it's fried now, so I can't use that one. It had the same loads, so why is the newer and better PC running worse?


Expensive? Over here in rip off Australia a 8GB kit is an earth shattering $40. Which is nothing. As for compatibility issues, upgrade. Or get a 64-bit version of 7 (who even runs 32-bit 7? I've never even see 32-bit store bought PC's for sale!) and run a VM. 8GB is the sweet spot. You've got too much crap running on your system.
September 13, 2012 2:47:50 AM

egilbe said:
32 bit OS's can only address 2^32 bit addresses. That includes all the memory in your pc, HDD caches, DVD-rom cache, video card ram, BIOS and CPU cache. The main benefit of a 64bit OS is that when you put 4 gigs of ram in your pc, you have 4 gigs available for programs and OS. 64 bit OS has 2^64 bit addresses that's available (theoretically) any limitations below that are written into the OS itself.

32 bit Windows can access page files above the 4GB limit, and CPU cache and VRAM do not apply. In fact, with a modern processor you can have say 8GB of RAM and create a 4GB ramdisk on the portion Windows cannot access, effectively giving you 8GB of RAM (though it will work somewhat slower than having 8GB natively, it is still a lot faster than even a page file on an SSD.)
September 13, 2012 2:57:05 AM

Man...first of all...stop constantly telling me about 64-bit...I know 64-bit has capability, but I use 32-bit. Can't be changed, and that's it. If it could be changed, I would. Smeg, for you, $40 is nothing, but come here and tell me what you think after you see the prices. My home income is not enough to buy so much, and even this PC was bought after I saved up for a long time, so don't tell me that it's nothing. You don't know my financial condition, you don't know why I use what I use, so why not find the reason instead of constantly belittling me for using 32-bit Windows? Tell that to Microsoft and other nut-jobs who put money and licensing crap before consumer wishes. This isn't Australia, or America, or Europe...this is INDIA, so please, for the forum's sake, stop telling me the same things over and over again. The hardware is what it is and can't be changed. And for the record...more users use 32-bit than 64-bit, if not there, at least here they use. People here run systems as far back as Windows 95, so don't talk before knowing what's what and what's not.

And yes, the graphic card WAS in the old PC. Radeon series are high-end cards, and an HD 7950 is obviously a card with it's own set of memory. 3 GB DDR5 is not the same as 4 GB DDR3. Jtnorj, as I said, the old PC had the same HDD, same graphic card, same amount of memory and same OS. I moved the Radeon to the new system, of course. Only the MB, Processor, Power Supply, Type of RAM (DDR2 to DDR3) and the Chassis has changed. The HDD, GC, OS and RAM amount is the same. As I said...I don't have a problem with a program using RAM if I am using it. If I'm using the browser, I do expect it to use RAM, or even the PF. But a brand-new reboot and the RAM is still full, and the PF is half used up already, so that's what I want to know...what's this invisible usage which is not being detected by either TM or Resource Monitor? Of course, that usage stays, so, the browser just adds to the usage, creating a full RAM. I close the browser, the RAM usage will go back to 800 MB for Hardware, 1300-1800 MB in use, around 1-1.40 GB PF use and the rest of the RAM free...I don't know why is so much RAM being used by the invisible thing.

And yes, I did a ForceEnable for PAE, but the usable RAM is still 3.23 GB. It was 3.23 before that, and still 3.23 after. On the old PC, it showed 3.50 GB, here, it's 3.23 GB usable.
a b $ Windows 7
September 13, 2012 6:46:28 AM

Windows uses whatever amount of ram you give it, it uses as much as it can where available to get things done faster. Its simply how it works. If you take out one stick you would see windows would be using less. Its nothing to worry about man.

Heres my usage with 4gb of ram and around 18 tabs open in chrome and 3 youtube videos open. It frees up the ram from the system when it needs to.

September 13, 2012 7:45:51 AM

I know it frees the RAM when it needs to...the only problem is that it has a heavy usage even with no programs running.
a b $ Windows 7
September 13, 2012 7:49:46 AM

Sooo... Whats the problem? If you aren't using the ram why can't windows use it to make things faster?
September 13, 2012 9:21:35 AM

The problem is...even with NO programs running, the RAM and PF usage is high...so, IDK what's the thing which makes Windows go crazy with RAM and PF usage...
September 13, 2012 11:21:45 AM

fb39ca4 said:
32 bit Windows can access page files above the 4GB limit, and CPU cache and VRAM do not apply. In fact, with a modern processor you can have say 8GB of RAM and create a 4GB ramdisk on the portion Windows cannot access, effectively giving you 8GB of RAM (though it will work somewhat slower than having 8GB natively, it is still a lot faster than even a page file on an SSD.)


false, a 32 bit OS can't address more than 4gb of ram. It's not possible. Anything the OS has to address counts towards the limit, including cache and Vram. There are more addresses available than the OS can use.
a b $ Windows 7
September 13, 2012 12:36:16 PM

OP has absolutely no idea how Windows memory management works. I'll give you just a little clue. Windows pre allocates page space (pre allocate != in actual use), the Task Manager shows both in use and pre allocated as a single value. As to memory useage. Memory lying around unused is memory wasted.

Quote:
I have experience with Windows, so I know what's best and what's not.


To both, no, you do not.
September 13, 2012 3:02:51 PM

amnesiaaisenma said:
I have been using Windows 7 for quite some while (2 or more weeks) on this new PC.

So thus far everything is peachy-keen.
amnesiaaisenma said:
Now...problem is, Task Manager shows a massive page-file usage. 1.40 GB used as soon as my PC starts (without loading any programs).

Has something changed here? What was done or shall I ask what made you look here and was there anything that was installed when you noticed something was a foot?!
amnesiaaisenma said:
I have 4 GB RAM, out of which, 3305 MB is usable (Microsoft licensing issues keep messing around with 32-bit Windows), and the page-file usage slowly gets to around 3 GB.

Can you please explain when you said "the Microsoft licensing issues keep messing around with 32-bit Windows"?
amnesiaaisenma said:
I have 4 partitions on my 1 TB HDD, and I had 2-4 GB page-file on each. I disabled the page-files on all the partitions, but TM still shows a massive usage of 2.5 GB as I am writing this article. I mean, there's 4 GB RAM, and even without running any programs, it's still around 1.40 GB page-file usage.

What you should actually do is move your pagefile to a completely different physical drive to split up the workload.
amnesiaaisenma said:
I disabled Superfetch and the page-file on all the drives, now Windows is giving me out-of-memory errors.

SuperFetch caches the most frequently accessed application files in RAM so your applications will open more quickly. It's one of the many reasons why Windows 7 feels so much more "snappy" and disabling the pagefile takes away RAM that Windows could be using for caching.
The big problem with disabling your pagefile is that once you've exhausted the available RAM, your apps are going to start crashing, since there's no virtual memory for Windows to allocate—and worst case, your actual system will crash or become very unstable.
amnesiaaisenma said:
TM is showing 710 MB RAM available out of 3304 MB, and 70 MB free. IDK what is using the RAM and causing this big a page-file usage. My PC is gone very slow, and it sucks. Any way to reduce this much disk-activity, and actually use the RAM? Nothing in the TM shows active (CPU is always at 0-5 %), so nothing is eating memory. What's causing this much RAM and page-file usage?

If your system has 4GB of RAM and your peak memory usage was 5GB (including virtual memory), you should set your pagefile to at least 1GB and the maximum as 2GB to give you a buffer to keep you safe in case a RAM-hungry application needs it.
Try the following link to download Process Explorer which may provide further detail. - http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb89665...

With 4GB installed but only 710MB available this is indeed a little concerning, does the system upon bootup register 4096 of memory on the post screen?
Have you performed a memtest of the RAM modules (sorry if this has been requested already)?
Do you have anything set in the BIOS that should be disabled i.e. memory remapping?
What about the video card, you should be able to view the memory usage within the driver/software?

Hope this helps...
September 19, 2012 3:50:39 AM

OK, I formatted my system and installed Windows anew. Of course, I had used Windows 7 for a moth, it's just 2 weeks or more on the new PC, and it's similar to XP, so I can easily find my way around here. I have only installed what I need: Google Chrome, Yahoo and MSN Messenger, FlashGet, BitTorrent, TeraCopy, mIRC and of course, the drivers...only that much. and even now, after I formatted the system, it's big usage of RAM (2380 MB in use) and 2.36 GB PF use. Still, the system isn't slow, but this much usage is a nuisance. The Display Properties shows 358 MB as Total available graphics memory, 3072 MB as Dedicated Video Memory and 1382 MB as SHared System Memory. My graphic card is an ATI Radeon Sapphire HD 7950. Is that eating so much memory? I don't think it should, since it has 3 GB of onboard RAM, but the Shared Memory is 1382 MB, so IDK.

By Microsoft Licensing issues, I mean that Microsoft won't allow 32-Bit Windows to natively support more than 4 GB or RAM due to licensing issues (Check Wikipedia for more information). So, their licensing, patenting, copyright and other crap messes with the progress of something, that's what I meant there.

The other physical drive already has data, which is a sort of a back up for my main HDD, so can't use that for PF.

And I mentioned before, I had disabled Superfetch and PF only to test what was using it up and to reduce the dependence of Windows on the PF, but that didn't help, so I enabled them.

I know about Process Explorer, but IDK how to know the peak usage. Any help there?

Right now, the memory usage (this is, OFC, the new installation) is as follows: Hardware Reserved = 820 MB, In Use = 2300 MB, Modified = 30 MB, Standby = 850 MB and Free = 85 MB. PF usage is 2.30 GB.

I did perform MemTest, and RAM modules are clean. Also, the BIOS registers 4096, but of course, even with PAE, available memory is still 3.20 GB. I have nothing in the BIOS like Memory Remapping.

IDK how to see the memory usage of the Radeon with the Catalyst Control Center.
September 19, 2012 4:42:01 AM

Clean install 64-bit 7. Microsoft has nothing to do with licencing 32-bit, 32-bit is physically limited to less than 4GB. And why are you running 32? Everyone should run 64 in 2012.
a b $ Windows 7
September 19, 2012 6:20:30 AM

shared system memory? is that an ati thing? still not sure what your problem is, not a nuisance but a problem, with symptoms that you see in use, not when you look for them.
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