I think I might use Pascal for my next IF game...

Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

....anyone have any experience using Pascal and can comment on it's
effectiveness?

That, and maybe Lisp or Python. I want to use an obscure language so
that it's a challenge.

Paul
14 answers Last reply
More about pascal game
  1. Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

    I would think that writing a good game would be a challenge regardless
    of the language used.

    ~Mick
  2. Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

    dunric@yahoo.com wrote:
    > ...anyone have any experience using Pascal and can comment on it's
    > effectiveness?
    >
    > That, and maybe Lisp or Python. I want to use an obscure language so
    > that it's a challenge.

    I suggested Logo to you a couple of years ago. Ever have a go at it
    yet?
    Logo's list processing will make it easy. Couple that with the graphics
    capability, and you have an excellent adventure language - list
    processing & graphics prowess.

    Ben
  3. Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

    On 14 Jun 2005 17:58:01 -0700, dunric@yahoo.com wrote:

    > That, and maybe Lisp or Python. I want to use an obscure language so
    > that it's a challenge.

    Python or Ruby aren't "obscure", but quite nice, easy to learn, readable
    scripting languages. Ruby is "more" OO than Python, so perhaps it's better
    suited for IF, and not yet as popular as Python. (

    If you want "obscure", try Haskell or Euphoria.

    M.
    --
    ClamWin, an open source antivirus software for Windows:
    http://www.clamwin.com/
  4. Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

    But... "why reinvent the wheel?"

    Actum Ne Agas: "Do not do a thing already done."

    If you want to create a game, then your focus should be on the game...
    not the implementation. People who want to build a house generally
    don't start the process by putting pine-nuts in the ground and adding
    water...
  5. Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

    Mike Snyder wrote:
    >
    > My take is a little different. I say, re-invent the wheel if wheel design is
    > what you like best. The problem is, Paul's home-made IF doesn't improve on
    > the available alternatives, nor does he end up with a game engine (just a
    > game). I think he likes solving programming problems more than he likes
    > writing games. Just a theory.
    >
    > --- Mike.

    I always figured Panks wrote games with obscure languages because:

    a) He likes being different.

    b) The games themselves aren't good enough to generate much interest
    but if he writes them in an obscure language, they'll get more
    attention than if he wrote them with Tads, Inform or something similar.


    I imagine he's hard at work on his Ancient Sumerian Parser even now...
  6. Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

    "sundialsvc4" <gargle@sundialservices.com> wrote in message
    news:1119646777.171311.134540@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    > But... "why reinvent the wheel?"
    >
    > Actum Ne Agas: "Do not do a thing already done."
    >
    > If you want to create a game, then your focus should be on the game...
    > not the implementation. People who want to build a house generally
    > don't start the process by putting pine-nuts in the ground and adding
    > water...

    My take is a little different. I say, re-invent the wheel if wheel design is
    what you like best. The problem is, Paul's home-made IF doesn't improve on
    the available alternatives, nor does he end up with a game engine (just a
    game). I think he likes solving programming problems more than he likes
    writing games. Just a theory.

    --- Mike.
  7. Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

    "Ancient Sumerian Parser" ?

    That's a good one. :)

    Actually, I write games in obscure languages because I enjoy the
    challenge of creating works of interactive fiction in languages most
    people wouldn't consider as a first (or even second or third)
    alternative.

    I have written adventure games in a variety of BASIC interpreters and
    compilers, some archiac and others esoteric, including even Mini-BASIC
    (see 'Dark Forest 1' and 'Dark Forest II' for examples of an IF game
    being written in a glorified version of Tiny-BASIC -- e.g. without
    string commands!)

    HLA was anothe esoteric language, bordering on assembly language and C,
    which peeked (peaked? :) my interest.

    I believe C/C++ isn't much of a challenge. Anyone can write a game in
    C. But HLA took several weeks to learn, and I needed the help of Frank
    Kotler, Randall Hyde and Sevag Krikorian to even get the game engine up
    and running. Note: By game engine, I mean: data structures, a la a
    mystagogue version of a Scott Adams game.

    Most of my games are so weird, and so bizarre, that I might as well be
    a mystagogue IF-writer.

    Paul

    dwhyld@gmail.com wrote:
    > Mike Snyder wrote:
    > >
    > > My take is a little different. I say, re-invent the wheel if wheel design is
    > > what you like best. The problem is, Paul's home-made IF doesn't improve on
    > > the available alternatives, nor does he end up with a game engine (just a
    > > game). I think he likes solving programming problems more than he likes
    > > writing games. Just a theory.
    > >
    > > --- Mike.
    >
    > I always figured Panks wrote games with obscure languages because:
    >
    > a) He likes being different.
    >
    > b) The games themselves aren't good enough to generate much interest
    > but if he writes them in an obscure language, they'll get more
    > attention than if he wrote them with Tads, Inform or something similar.
    >
    >
    > I imagine he's hard at work on his Ancient Sumerian Parser even now...
  8. Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

    dwhyld@gmail.com wrote:
    > I always figured Panks wrote games with obscure languages because:
    >
    > a) He likes being different.

    <devils advocate>
    There is a glut of good quality functional and playable games written in
    modern IF authoring systems flooding the market. Paul is addressing the
    imbalance.
    </devils advocate>

    What is interesting is the refusal to learn, create or use any dedicated
    IF authoring system and the desire to produce 'Scott Adams' style games.
    The interesting part is that Scott Adams used a dedicated IF authoring
    system (his own) to write the games. There is a fallacy here, especially
    considering that several early IF authors and companies either created
    and/or used IF authoring systems or used and developed bespoke game engines.

    Game engines develop over time and so does the quality of games using
    them, but this only happens if you are using/writing/developing an engine.

    > b) The games themselves aren't good enough to generate much interest
    > but if he writes them in an obscure language, they'll get more
    > attention than if he wrote them with Tads, Inform or something similar.

    Many of Paul's games are written in BASIC variants, these are hardly
    obscure. I would recommend that he uses a powerful modern procedural
    BASIC such as, for instance, BBC BASIC. A language which if he switched
    to and learned to write in a structured way he could certainly produce
    better quality code. Paul's current programming style leaves much to be
    desired and I believe that this is part of his failure to develop his
    skills to the point where he can write easily maintainable, readable and
    structured code. This also leads to the fact that unnecessarily complex,
    unstructued spaghetti code writen in the style of a novice who never has
    developed good programming practices is a nightmare to develop, debug or
    improve to any significant end. His programming style and devotion to a
    single game setting is a part of his failure to develop.

    HLA (High-level assembler) is hardly obscure. What might be impressive
    would be a game + engine written purely in assembler, but probably only
    in the way that he would be one of the few people to do it in a modern
    setting and only if it used more efficient algorithms. Currently Paul
    produces bloated and very inefficient code.

    I will say though to be fair that Paul should continue to write the
    games he wants to write. I am sure that he has an audience but I, like
    many others, write for myself.

    Paul has the willingness, drive and desire to produce interactive
    fiction. I believe that Paul has the potential to become a really good
    IF author, but only if he is willing to become one.

    If Paul expresses a desire to improve I say that we should help him, he
    needs his code and algorithms reviewing aswell as the games themselves.
    Even if the language is BASIC and not one of the modern IF authoring
    systems we should support any desire to improve that he expresses.

    > I imagine he's hard at work on his Ancient Sumerian Parser even now...

    Funny you should say that...

    Paul is currently writing Triple-Sec, a BASICesque language which
    appears to be emminently suitable for writing dunric type games.

    http://groups-beta.google.com/group/alt.lang.basic/browse_thread/thread/64c7b4f721ade1a/065fd05b51c55218

    No doubt there will be a masterpiece from him coming soon.

    Have fun,
    Jon Ripley
    --
    http://jonripley.com/
  9. Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

    On 25 Jun 2005 11:06:15 -0700, dunric@yahoo.com wrote:

    > HLA was anothe esoteric language, bordering on assembly language and C,
    > which peeked (peaked? :) my interest.

    "piqued" is the word you're looking for.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=peeked
    1. To glance quickly.
    2. To look or peer furtively, as from a place of concealment.
    3. To be only partially visible, as if peering or emerging from hiding:
    Tiny crocuses peeked through the snow.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=peaked
    1. (one syllable) Ending in a peak; pointed: a peaked cap.
    2. (two syllables) Having a sickly appearance: You're looking a little
    peaked today.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=piqued
    2. To provoke; arouse: The portrait piqued her curiosity.
  10. Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

    Right, thanks Ross.

    Paul
  11. Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

    A bit unclear on the 'hack value' term used, but I am assuming the
    value of a programming language used purely for esoteric reasons?

    Paul
  12. Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

    In article <1119722775.651743.200240@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
    <dunric@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >"Ancient Sumerian Parser" ?
    >
    >That's a good one. :)
    >
    >Actually, I write games in obscure languages because I enjoy the
    >challenge of creating works of interactive fiction in languages most
    >people wouldn't consider as a first (or even second or third)
    >alternative.
    >
    In which you might consider COBOL, as (with possibly a handful of
    exceptions) nobody writes COBOL without being paid for it. Every
    other language I've seen mentioned in this thread has something of
    a community of people who use it because they want to. (Actually,
    I can't say that for Euphoria, since I've never heard of it before.)

    It won't take that long to learn the language, but it will take longer
    to get used to it. However, I can't think of a better language to
    use if what you want is the exact opposite of hack value.

    --
    David H. Thornley | If you want my opinion, ask.
    david@thornley.net | If you don't, flee.
    http://www.thornley.net/~thornley/david/ | O-
  13. Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

    In article <1119891562.941228.98840@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
    <dunric@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >A bit unclear on the 'hack value' term used, but I am assuming the
    >value of a programming language used purely for esoteric reasons?
    >
    "Hack value" is more like what inspires admiration and envy in born
    programmers. They tend to have a low opinion of COBOL, and certainly
    don't want to write in it, so something written in COBOL would have
    negative hack value. Conversely, writing anything halfway useful in,
    say, Intercal inspires admiration.


    --
    David H. Thornley | If you want my opinion, ask.
    david@thornley.net | If you don't, flee.
    http://www.thornley.net/~thornley/david/ | O-
  14. Archived from groups: rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

    On Sat, 25 Jun 2005 12:00:21 GMT
    Jon Ripley <news@jonripley.com> wrote:

    :What might be impressive
    :would be a game + engine written purely in assembler,

    As it happens, in the days when the IBM PC was new, I wrote such an engine,
    and my wife wrote about a dozen different game scripts for it. Just
    recently, I decided to resurrect one of those games ("Castle Elsinore"),
    and port it to Linux. As a result of this exercise, I am prepared to defend
    the position that assembler is still an excellent language in which to
    write game engines, and that most of the algorithms which I used 22 years
    ago are still applicable.

    If, as is most likely, you have never played 'Elsinore', you can download
    the DOS version [elsinore.zip] or the ( Linux port [elsinore.tar] from my
    web site: www.pacificsites.com/~ccrayne/clax86/

    Please note that the Linux version is still in beta testing, and I would
    appreciate bug reports from anyone who is willing to assist me in this
    fashion.

    The game itself is very much in the style of the original advent|colossal
    caves|dungeon style and difficulty, although the parser is somewhat better.

    -- Chuck
Ask a new question

Read More

Python Pascal Games Video Games