Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

latent misogyny in the IF community

Last response: in Video Games
Share
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 4:30:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

Jacek Pudlo:

Why [there aren't any negative reviews of Galatea]? I believe the
answer is latent misogyny. The very idea of a woman writing
interactive fiction strikes the male geeks who populate these boards
as extravagant as the notion of a chimp typing on a laptop. In case
you've forgotten how she's been treated over the years, let me refresh
your memory.

>> Emily Short (quoted by Jacek Pudlo):
>> I participate in this forum as a creator and critic and (I hope) as
an
>> equal. I am uncomfortable being put on a pedestal; I am even more
>> uncomfortable being assigned a role based on my gender.
>>
>> John W. Kennedy, responding (quoted by Jacek Pudlo):
>> You must understand that those of us men who appreciate intelligent
>> women --
>> even those of us lucky enough, like me, to be married to one -- are
still
>> astonished and delighted to find another.

JohnnyMrNinja:

Point well taken. But this certainly isn't just a IF issue. Sexism is
ingrained in our culture so deep that passively "raising awareness"
won't effect real change for *many* decades. I think we can safely say
that "astonished" to find "another" intelligent woman is insulting to
women in general.


Jacek Pudlo:

Have you ever wondered why *no one* has *ever* raised as much as an
eye-brow at Cadre's I-0? Am I the only one who thinks that the main
character of I-0
smacks of stereotypical male slut fantasies? Every response the game
offers
suggests that I'll spread my legs for any football player with the
decency
to take me out for a Big Mac. How do [you] think games like that make
women feel?


----------------------------------------


I don't know. Do they even care? Would men care if the PC were a male
bimbo? Seriously, I'm curious what women think about sexual
stereotyping in IF.

I think political correctness is a double-edged sword. Yes, you could
say that Emily Short has been the victim of sexual harassment, but you
could just as easily say that her gender has been an advantage,
attracting players to an author they otherwise wouldn't have noticed.
I don't know her and I haven't played any of her games, but it has
always struck me as strange when women authors who claim to be
uncomfortable being assigned a role based on their gender openly
flaunt their gender. If she's deeply concerned about being
discriminated against, she could always use a male pseudonym.
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 2:32:49 AM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

Just for the record, despite the name, I'm a man - it's just that the
Outlook Express on my computer is somehow logged as my girlfriend and I
haven't figured out how to change it... (some geek I am...)

Anyway, my twopenneth:

> Have you ever wondered why *no one* has *ever* raised as much as an
> eye-brow at Cadre's I-0? Am I the only one who thinks that the main
> character of I-0
> smacks of stereotypical male slut fantasies? Every response the game
> offers
> suggests that I'll spread my legs for any football player with the
> decency
> to take me out for a Big Mac. How do [you] think games like that make
> women feel?

No, you're not the only one - like plenty of AIF games out there, I-0 is
based on 'sterotypical male slut fantasies'. Nobody has 'raised an eyebrow'
largely because, sadly, it's nothing particularly unusual - it's certainly
not the worst offender of its kind.


> I don't know. Do they even care? Would men care if the PC were a male
> bimbo?

Probably not. Chances are, they just wouldn't have played it, and it
wouldn't have become as well known as it is.
The fact is, most of the people who play such games (especially who talk
about them and make their opinions felt) are male, and so that's the
audience that's going to be pandered to more than any other.

> I think political correctness is a double-edged sword. Yes, you could
> say that Emily Short has been the victim of sexual harassment, but you
> could just as easily say that her gender has been an advantage,
> attracting players to an author they otherwise wouldn't have noticed.
> I don't know her and I haven't played any of her games, but it has
> always struck me as strange when women authors who claim to be
> uncomfortable being assigned a role based on their gender openly
> flaunt their gender. If she's deeply concerned about being
> discriminated against, she could always use a male pseudonym.

I also don't know anything about her (and I'm new to the community in
general), but is she actually 'flaunting' her gender just by using her real
name rather than pretending to be a man? Should she have to change her name
just to 'blend in'?
Being one of the (relatively) few females in the field may garner attention
for her, but if there's no quality to her writing, then she'd just fall by
the wayside like so many others.
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 5:04:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

> If you avoid hitchhiking at all costs, you eventually end up stranded
> at a gas station, and the only way I've found to proceed from there is
> to seduce a total stranger who shows up to get gas.

You can also trade the tape in your car (if you have the foresight to
take it) for his soda. The game is designed so that it can be played
like a straightforward puzzle game no matter what plot branches you
choose to take. That so few actually proceed through the game by
solving the puzzles has some interesting implications...

-----
Adam Cadre, Holyoke, MA
http://adamcadre.ac
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 8:37:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

Cadre, crawling out from under his rock:

"That so few actually proceed through the game by
solving the puzzles has some interesting implications..."

Doesn't the light sting your eyes?
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 10:15:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

Walter S. wrote:

snipped

Isn't there something we can do about this guy? Contact the Swedish
authorities? It can't be legal to insult people like that. Not even in
Europe. Have his unemployment benefits revoked? Chip in for a hitman?
Speaking of which, didn't he win the Golden Banana of Discord? Wouldn't
the previous winner have his real life address?
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 12:47:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

"Gregory Weir" <gregory.weir@gmail.com> wrote in message news:<1119233523.407539.305550@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>...
> > Seriously, I'm curious what women think about sexual
> > stereotyping in IF.
>
> I realize that the initial question was directed at the women of the
> community, but I think that two points should be raised here.
>
> > Why [there aren't any negative reviews of Galatea]? I believe the
> > answer is latent misogyny. The very idea of a woman writing
> > interactive fiction strikes the male geeks who populate these boards
> > as extravagant as the notion of a chimp typing on a laptop.
>
> First, as Karen Duncan's boyfriend alluded to, Emily Short isn't the
> only skilled woman writing IF. There are Suzanne Britton, Jessica
> Knoch, Kathleen M. Fischer, and Laura Knauth, to name just a few
> female-named people that have been well-received by the community.
> Additionally, not all women are well-received; there are quite a few
> female-sounding names with one- or two-star reviews on Baf's Guide. I'd
> venture to say that Emily Short is just the most prolific of the
> skilled women writing IF. Sure, there are those with stereotypes, but I
> think that it's a mistake to attribute her "fame" (or "popularity" or
> whatever you'd like to call it) entirely to her gender.

But none of those women writers make a big thing out of being women.
They don't whine and complain about being badly treated because of
their gender, and they certainly don't ask anyone (out of the blue)
*not* to put them on a pedestal.

Karen Duncan's boyfriend:

> I also don't know anything about her (and I'm new to the community in
> general), but is she actually 'flaunting' her gender just by using her real
> name rather than pretending to be a man? Should she have to change her name
> just to 'blend in'?

'flaunting' was a bad choice of word. 'constantly emphasizing' is
better. She writes a game centered around a female NPC who both
emotionally and intellectually bares a striking resemblence to the
author and who is literally standing on a pedestal. Then, she asks
people on raif not to put her on a pedestal. Do you really have to be
Freud to figure this one out?

I think she wants to have the cake and eat it too: to be the Creative
Female of IF, and, when she gets the 'wrong' kind of attention, to be
treated as if she were genderless.


JohnnyMrNinja:

> A person that plays a role in a movie or TV show is an actor. A person
> who plays a role in a movie or TV show and is a woman is an actress.
> Waiter - waitress, host - hostess, steward - stewardess. They are,
> grammatically, a subset. You can't even refer to a person without
> gender making a diference - his/hers, him/her, he/she. Many non-English
> languages assign gender to inanimate objects (part of my current
> trouble learning Spanish). Gender is ingrained in how we view the
> world.

Murderer, burglar, thief, rapist, all of those are stereotypically
male. Hobbyist social linguistics strikes both ways.
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 5:43:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

"Walter S." wrote:
> Cadre, crawling out from under his rock:

Hello, friendly sock-puppet!

So you think of real life as the underside of the rock and of
the IF newsgroups as the big bright world, eh? I guess that explains
why you spend all your time here chatting with your own pseudonyms.

I haven't actually followed these groups since '02 - your plagiarized
post came up on a search for something else, and I figured I'd pop by
and post a link to your source. Because while most people hold you in
contempt, there are still a noble few who are more inclined to view you
with pity, thinking that you actually do care about IF but can only
show it in a twisted way because of your unfortunate sociopathy. But,
nah, you don't actually care; not only is your outrage fake, but you
can't even be bothered to pen your own outrage. I'm sure you'll be
back shortly to insist that while you didn't actually play I-0, you
think the raper was a cop. And perhaps if you're feeling especially
inspired you might go on to muse about molesting poor Ginny on the
ride home from the airport. I can understand the temptation to
repost articles from the 1990s - after all, no Pudlo back then - but
I caught them the first time around, so I don't really need to sit
through the reruns.

Bye now!

http://www.americanbear.org/Jerry_bear%20waving.jpg

-----
Adam Cadre, Holyoke, MA
http://adamcadre.ac
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 8:10:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

In article <DKmdnYpfXbnx0yvfRVn-gw@comcast.com>,
Adam Cadre <see-website-for-address@adamcadre.ac> wrote:
> > If you avoid hitchhiking at all costs, you eventually end up stranded
> > at a gas station, and the only way I've found to proceed from there is
> > to seduce a total stranger who shows up to get gas.
>
>You can also trade the tape in your car (if you have the foresight to
>take it) for his soda. The game is designed so that it can be played
>like a straightforward puzzle game no matter what plot branches you
>choose to take. That so few actually proceed through the game by
>solving the puzzles has some interesting implications...
>
I remember another way, also a bit outside IF norms, but certainly
not sexual.
F
R
O
B
O
Z
Z
M
A
G
I
C
S
P
O
I
L
E
R
S
P
A
C
E
If you hit the guy with the pop, he'll run and hide. Problem solved,
although for everybody remembering "Violence isn't the answer to this
one." it might be a bit hard to think to try.

You can seduce him, hit him, or if you searched the car in the first
place trade the tape. I thought there were a lot of people who *liked*
multiple solutions to problems.

--
David H. Thornley | If you want my opinion, ask.
david@thornley.net | If you don't, flee.
http://www.thornley.net/~thornley/david/ | O-
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 9:52:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

"George Sand" <george_sand9@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:ceca02c.0506200747.5a0b0226@posting.google.com...
>
> But none of those women writers make a big thing out of being women.
> They don't whine and complain about being badly treated because of
> their gender, and they certainly don't ask anyone (out of the blue)
> *not* to put them on a pedestal.


I'm assuming "George Sand" is another Pudloony, not worth
replying to. But for the benefit of those who weren't around
these newsgroups in April and May 2001 and might be misled
by that "out of the blue", a little Googling may provide some
(depressing and mildly distasteful) context.

Cheers, Roger
--
/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
You'll find all my IF pages at http://www.firthworks.com/roger
WARNING: aggressive spam deletion -- use a meaningful Subject!
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 10:15:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

George Sand wrote:
>But none of those women writers make a big thing out of being women.
>They don't whine and complain about being badly treated because of
>their gender, and they certainly don't ask anyone (out of the blue)
>*not* to put them on a pedestal.

Just to set the record straight, she was responding directly to people whose
behavior could be accurately described as placing her on a pedestal. Here's
the article in its original context:

http://groups-beta.google.com/group/rec.arts.int-fictio...

-- Ben
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 10:19:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

Jacek Pudlo wrote:

> There are two beings in the universe who could have disclosed my plagiarism:
> the original author and you. The fact that it was you, and that you did it
> so quickly, tells me two things: a) that you spend a considerable portion of
> your spare time typing "Adam Cadre" on Google b) that you have memorised
> *every single* sentence ever written about your work. Now, if that isn't
> dark and creepy, then what is?

You know, I still have a memory of you thanking me for my review of
"Gamlet" on ifMUD. People notice things that others tell them. I assume
that this is doubly true of authors regarding critiques of their works
- particularly their first published works. Since you're an author
whose first game was in last year's comp, you probably realize that
jogging the old memory banks ain't no big deal.

And you aren't fooling anyone. We know that part of the scene in the
pantry was an earnest homage to a certain fromage enthusiast. Deny it
if you must...

(Disgression: an appropriate place to mention something about knowing
not to feed troll, but permit me to engorge myself. Naivete was always
my strong point.)

You stated earlier (many times) your contempt for "the big names" in
interactive fiction. This just flummoxes a naif like me. Those folks
who you mentioned have each made themselves probably more talked about
than even an egomaniac would like by doing something that completely
rewrites the ground rules of IF (and, importantly, have made their
works fun to play as well, else who cares about an innovative concept
that's trite and boring?). Why does this leave me baffled? Simply
because that, as a reviewer (although an admittedly lousy one - but no
one can fault me for taste), I think you're damn close to that level on
the virtues of your writing alone.

That is, if you can stop plagiarizing. But, I digress.

Gamlet was simply the most vividly written game I've ever played. I
said it was evocative before, and I'll say it again. The imagery was
terribly strong, the PC characterization may be second to none, and the
descriptions were just flat out wonderous (sometimes obscuring the
details, perhaps, but that was a very small price to pay.)

>From your posts, it sounds like you think that you have something to
prove. You don't. Jealous? Stop the trolling and get down to writing a
game that'll blow everyone away. You have the talent, and if you don't
realize it and/or utilize it, you're a fool.

joshua h
Anonymous
June 21, 2005 1:06:52 AM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

I've only written one game so far, but at first I was concerned that
male players might not choose to play it if they knew that the author
was female. Of course it's not really fair to pre-judge the
game-playing public that way, but I suspect there might be other female
authors who have had the same fears.

I know that there are plenty of men who treat women fairly -- I happen
to be married to one of them!
Anonymous
June 21, 2005 1:23:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

"Adam Cadre" <see-website-for-address@adamcadre.ac> skrev i meddelandet
news:JvydnQavv-msnSrfRVn-qQ@comcast.com...
> "Walter S." wrote:
> > Cadre, crawling out from under his rock:
>
> Hello, friendly sock-puppet!
>
> So you think of real life as the underside of the rock and of
> the IF newsgroups as the big bright world, eh? I guess that explains
> why you spend all your time here chatting with your own pseudonyms.

There are two beings in the universe who could have disclosed my plagiarism:
the original author and you. The fact that it was you, and that you did it
so quickly, tells me two things: a) that you spend a considerable portion of
your spare time typing "Adam Cadre" on Google b) that you have memorised
*every single* sentence ever written about your work. Now, if that isn't
dark and creepy, then what is?

(It took Adam little more than ten hours to spot the two sentences I
plagiarised and announce his triumphant disclosure. Ten hours is
aproximately the time it takes Google to update it's archive. This fact has
some fairly unpleasant implications concerning Adam's past time activities.)

Here's Adam trying to weasel out:

> I haven't actually followed these groups since '02 - your plagiarized
> post came up on a search for something else, and I figured I'd pop by
> and post a link to your source.

March 10 2004. "Common Era (was What Would You Like)" Your little excursion
in the field of political correctness. Did that too come up on a search for
something else, while you were busy not following these groups? When you
lie, it's always the small, inconsequential things that betray you, the
details you feel obliged to add to make your lie more believable.

[...]

> Bye now!

You've swallowed the bait. Even if you never post here again, I'll always
know you'll be following my work. That makes me warm and fuzzy inside.
Anonymous
June 21, 2005 3:56:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

Jacek Pudlo wrote:
> There are two beings in the universe who could have disclosed my plagiarism:
> the original author and you. The fact that it was you, and that you did it
> so quickly, tells me two things: a) that you spend a considerable portion of
> your spare time typing "Adam Cadre" on Google b) that you have memorised
> *every single* sentence ever written about your work. Now, if that isn't
> dark and creepy, then what is?

For anyone interested, there is a "Google Alerts" function that
automatically emails you with new news articles or websites based on
criteria. So if someone like, say Adam Cadre, entered a term like, say
"Adam Cadre", then just about every mention of "Adam Cadre" would be
quickly emailed to Adam Cadre. Neat, eh?

BTW, I'm doing some research... What exactly is a billy-goat "gruff"?
E-bay seems out.
Anonymous
June 21, 2005 4:03:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

In article <1119233523.407539.305550@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
Gregory Weir <gregory.weir@gmail.com> wrote:
>It's a piece of interactive fiction... nowhere does the game
>force you to remove any clothing or make out with random fast-food
>employees.

If you want a game that does require you to be a slut in order to
advance the plot, I can wholeheartedly recommend _Stiffy Makane: The
Undiscovered Country_.

Just sayin'.

Adam
Anonymous
June 21, 2005 10:18:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

Jacek Pudlo wrote:
> (It took Adam little more than ten hours to spot the two sentences I
> plagiarised and announce his triumphant disclosure. Ten hours is
> aproximately the time it takes Google to update it's archive.

Just to set the record straight again, Usenet articles seem to show up in
Google Groups searches within a few minutes of being posted, even if they
weren't posted directly to Google's server. The web index updates much more
slowly, because Googlebot is too polite to request every web page on the
internet every five minutes.

-- Ben
Anonymous
June 22, 2005 9:21:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

Adam Cadre wrote:
> > If you avoid hitchhiking at all costs, you eventually end up stranded
> > at a gas station, and the only way I've found to proceed from there is
> > to seduce a total stranger who shows up to get gas.
>
> You can also trade the tape in your car (if you have the foresight to
> take it) for his soda. The game is designed so that it can be played
> like a straightforward puzzle game no matter what plot branches you
> choose to take. That so few actually proceed through the game by
> solving the puzzles has some interesting implications...
>

I never even knew there *was* a tape in her car, and I investigated
pretty thoroughly. Whatever other implications there may be, one of
them is simply that the more AIF-style solutions are a lot easier to
find than the puzzle-style solutions.

--
Ryukage
Anonymous
June 23, 2005 2:50:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

On 20 Jun 2005 23:56:44 -0700, JohnnyMrNinja wrote:

> BTW, I'm doing some research... What exactly is a billy-goat "gruff"?
> E-bay seems out.

It's a story.

The Annotated Three Billy Goats Gruff:

http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/billygoats/
Anonymous
June 23, 2005 2:51:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

On Tue, 21 Jun 2005 18:18:52 +0100, Ben Rudiak-Gould wrote:

> Jacek Pudlo wrote:
>> (It took Adam little more than ten hours to spot the two sentences I
>> plagiarised and announce his triumphant disclosure. Ten hours is
>> aproximately the time it takes Google to update it's archive.
>
> Just to set the record straight again, Usenet articles seem to show up in
> Google Groups searches within a few minutes of being posted, even if they
> weren't posted directly to Google's server. The web index updates much more
> slowly, because Googlebot is too polite to request every web page on the
> internet every five minutes.
>
> -- Ben

The actual delay may vary; it seems to me it would be dependent on the
server on which the article is posted, and the path from there to Google's
Usenet feed.
June 26, 2005 4:37:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

I don't know why there are or aren't negative reviews of EM Short's
games -- I've never looked. All I know is that I don't play them
because I don't enjoy them. I don't enjoy them because I don't care for
the particular set of neurosees that her characters manifest. (I find
Galetea particularly annoying.) So I don't think that IF has any
misogynist tendencies at all. I think it may suffer from cliques and
the fanboys/girls drawn to them, but if so, that makes it no different
than any other field of human endevor.

~Poster
Anonymous
June 29, 2005 5:08:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

"JohnnyMrNinja" <JohnnyMrNinja@gmail.com> wrote in message news:<1119337004.626289.260590@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>...
> Jacek Pudlo wrote:
> > There are two beings in the universe who could have disclosed my plagiarism:
> > the original author and you. The fact that it was you, and that you did it
> > so quickly, tells me two things: a) that you spend a considerable portion of
> > your spare time typing "Adam Cadre" on Google b) that you have memorised
> > *every single* sentence ever written about your work. Now, if that isn't
> > dark and creepy, then what is?
>
> For anyone interested, there is a "Google Alerts" function that
> automatically emails you with new news articles or websites based on
> criteria. So if someone like, say Adam Cadre, entered a term like, say
> "Adam Cadre", then just about every mention of "Adam Cadre" would be
> quickly emailed to Adam Cadre.

Would that be Google's equivalent of masturbating in front of a mirror?
Anonymous
June 29, 2005 4:14:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

On 29 Jun 2005 01:08:35 -0700, krochmal@sociologist.com (Aaron Krochmal)
wrote:

>"JohnnyMrNinja" <JohnnyMrNinja@gmail.com> wrote in message news:<1119337004.626289.260590@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>...
>> Jacek Pudlo wrote:
>> > There are two beings in the universe who could have disclosed my plagiarism:
>> > the original author and you. The fact that it was you, and that you did it
>> > so quickly, tells me two things: a) that you spend a considerable portion of
>> > your spare time typing "Adam Cadre" on Google b) that you have memorised
>> > *every single* sentence ever written about your work. Now, if that isn't
>> > dark and creepy, then what is?
>>
>> For anyone interested, there is a "Google Alerts" function that
>> automatically emails you with new news articles or websites based on
>> criteria. So if someone like, say Adam Cadre, entered a term like, say
>> "Adam Cadre", then just about every mention of "Adam Cadre" would be
>> quickly emailed to Adam Cadre.
>
>Would that be Google's equivalent of masturbating in front of a mirror?

Stiffy Makane and the Mirror of Google ?
Anonymous
June 30, 2005 7:13:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

Graham Holden <look@bottom.of.post> wrote in message news:<gi05c1lg9htb18702pe0ttt32ia1gpvi9n@4ax.com>...
> On 29 Jun 2005 01:08:35 -0700, krochmal@sociologist.com (Aaron Krochmal)
> wrote:
>
> >"JohnnyMrNinja" <JohnnyMrNinja@gmail.com> wrote in message news:<1119337004.626289.260590@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>...
> >> Jacek Pudlo wrote:
> >> > There are two beings in the universe who could have disclosed my plagiarism:
> >> > the original author and you. The fact that it was you, and that you did it
> >> > so quickly, tells me two things: a) that you spend a considerable portion of
> >> > your spare time typing "Adam Cadre" on Google b) that you have memorised
> >> > *every single* sentence ever written about your work. Now, if that isn't
> >> > dark and creepy, then what is?
> >>
> >> For anyone interested, there is a "Google Alerts" function that
> >> automatically emails you with new news articles or websites based on
> >> criteria. So if someone like, say Adam Cadre, entered a term like, say
> >> "Adam Cadre", then just about every mention of "Adam Cadre" would be
> >> quickly emailed to Adam Cadre.
> >
> >Would that be Google's equivalent of masturbating in front of a mirror?
>
> Stiffy Makane and the Mirror of Google ?

Are you saying that by typing "Adam Cadre" I'm causing Adam Cadre to
ejaculate into his own mouth?
Anonymous
June 30, 2005 8:03:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

"Roger Firth" <roger@firthworks.com> wrote in message news:<1119286365.74071.0@dyke.uk.clara.net>...
> "George Sand" <george_sand9@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:ceca02c.0506200747.5a0b0226@posting.google.com...
> >
> > But none of those women writers make a big thing out of being women.
> > They don't whine and complain about being badly treated because of
> > their gender, and they certainly don't ask anyone (out of the blue)
> > *not* to put them on a pedestal.
>
>
> I'm assuming "George Sand" is another Pudloony, not worth
> replying to. But for the benefit of those who weren't around
> these newsgroups in April and May 2001 and might be misled
> by that "out of the blue", a little Googling may provide some
> (depressing and mildly distasteful) context.

I don't think she needs your kind of knee-jerk support. It only
reinforces the image of the ice queen living in a dream world,
surrounded by sycophants.
Anonymous
July 1, 2005 8:22:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

why?
Anonymous
July 3, 2005 5:49:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

eh?
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 5:16:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.arts.int-fiction,rec.games.int-fiction (More info?)

In article <gi05c1lg9htb18702pe0ttt32ia1gpvi9n@4ax.com>,
Graham Holden <look@bottom.of.post> wrote:
>Stiffy Makane and the Mirror of Google ?

Hogwart's as you've *NEVER* seen it before.

Stiffy Makane as you've *OFTEN* seen him before.

Adam
!