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What would make my computer want to run Check Disc at startup?

Last response: in Windows 7
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September 16, 2012 3:57:36 PM

This happened a while back when I first installed windows but when I did it back then it messed it up A LOT and either reinstalled windows or did a system restore to fix it again. So today it wanted to run Check disc again at start up, at first I didn't let it, I ran it in the OS and nothing came up, I decided to reboot and see if it would ask again, it did and I let it run and everything is running normal, no errors reported either.

I'm just wondering what would make windows decide that it needed to run this today? I don't think anything strange has been happening to my computer (I change to a trial anitvirus though) and check disc seemed to agree everything was normal seeing as there were no errors. It just makes me nervous, this is my first "real build" I've played with Linux on ancient Pentium III CPU builds before but now I have higher steaks if something go's wrong.
a b $ Windows 7
September 16, 2012 4:06:50 PM

Did you have a power outage or turn the system off without shutting down properly ? Normally having the system shut down improperly will cause the system to set itself to check the HDD on the next restart - it does this because shutting down unexpectedly can cause data corruption if it was writing to the HDD or there were temporary files that did not get deleted properly before shutting down - when you shut down properly it writes information to the HDD as it shuts down which is checked on the next start up and if the file is missing or shows problems it will set itself to check the HDD as it starts to ensure that things are not corrupted or to correct any issues it finds before they cause system problems. If you continually get this prompt then it may be an indication that something is going wrong with your hardware (either HDD or RAM) but if it only occurs occasionally after a problem with shutting down occurred it is just a safety check and just letting it run shoould correct any issues.
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September 16, 2012 4:26:45 PM

Hmmm, the power didn't go out, and it seemed to shut down normally last night. This is the second time it's had me run it sinced I first installed windows in May. I'd consider twice in four months to be occasionally but then again, I can't say that I have ever seen one of my store bought systems run it.
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a b $ Windows 7
September 16, 2012 4:41:33 PM

When it runs the chkdsk does it report finding and correcting any errors ? -- If it does then it could be a HDD problem ( If it is finding bad spots in the magnetic layer of the disk and having to redirect pieces of the files and mark those bad spots as bad sectors so they no longer get used ) - an occasional problem or bad sector is not really anything to worry about but if it starts to become more prevalent then you might want to consider replacing the HDD or at least making a backup of any important files just in case.

If it didn't find any problems and is working fine now I'd figure it was just some interruption that occurred while shutting down (possibly a software program update that didn't clean up properly after it ran) and for safety the system ran the check and wouldn't worry about it unless it reoccurs.

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September 16, 2012 5:01:14 PM

Yea it didn't come up with any errors at all. Like I said I've recently installed a trial for Norton anti virus, I hope that's not messing it up because so far I like it a lot.

....actually that reminds me of something, for fun last night I ran a quick scan and set Norton to shut off my system after the scan, maybe windows didn't like it???
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September 16, 2012 5:09:14 PM

JDFan said:
Did you have a power outage or turn the system off without shutting down properly ? Normally having the system shut down improperly will cause the system to set itself to check the HDD on the next restart - it does this because shutting down unexpectedly can cause data corruption if it was writing to the HDD or there were temporary files that did not get deleted properly before shutting down - when you shut down properly it writes information to the HDD as it shuts down which is checked on the next start up and if the file is missing or shows problems it will set itself to check the HDD as it starts to ensure that things are not corrupted or to correct any issues it finds before they cause system problems. If you continually get this prompt then it may be an indication that something is going wrong with your hardware (either HDD or RAM) but if it only occurs occasionally after a problem with shutting down occurred it is just a safety check and just letting it run shoould correct any issues.


Jesus dude, full stops...

Anyway I had this problem before, pain in the ass but it continued to work fine for another 2 years so... :) 
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September 16, 2012 8:21:59 PM

Jamessuperfun said:
Jesus dude, full stops...

Anyway I had this problem before, pain in the ass but it continued to work fine for another 2 years so... :) 

I bet your right, guess I'm just being parnoid/stupid, things have been rough yada yada yada. Any way did a reboot to make myself feel better and it booted up like normal, no disc check.

Cool to learn that it'll mark off bad sectors I didn't know HDDs did that.
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a b $ Windows 7
September 16, 2012 8:27:12 PM

mace200200 said:
I bet your right, guess I'm just being parnoid/stupid, things have been rough yada yada yada. Any way did a reboot to make myself feel better and it booted up like normal, no disc check.

Cool to learn that it'll mark off bad sectors I didn't know HDDs did that.


As stated above, it usually does happen for an improper shutdown; nothing to worry about it's normal. ;P
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September 16, 2012 8:33:34 PM

Just remember it doesn't fix the bad sectors. Checkdisk only flags that sector to be 'dirty' on a low level, and causes the drive to skip writing/reading from that sector.

It can even spread later on and you'll end up with a disk full of bad sectors.

Best is to copy everything you need off and replace the drive.
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September 16, 2012 11:51:55 PM

blakwidowrsa said:
Just remember it doesn't fix the bad sectors. Checkdisk only flags that sector to be 'dirty' on a low level, and causes the drive to skip writing/reading from that sector.

It can even spread later on and you'll end up with a disk full of bad sectors.

Best is to copy everything you need off and replace the drive.

I didn't think it would be able to fix them, as for replacing my drive, it didn't report and bad sectors or errors at all. My drive is slower and I've given thought to replace it, but there's better things I could spend that money on.
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September 18, 2012 9:07:36 PM

Best answer selected by mace200200.
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