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Computer hardware. Education/jobs. Is there such a thing?

Last response: in Work & Education
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Anonymous
March 12, 2012 6:34:25 AM

Hi, I've been into a community college for a little while under the impression I was going to go through with it and live on with my life etc etc. However, once I got into my college I noticed there was no such thing (or appeared to be) as a "computer hardware [specialist?]". I've always loved working with hardware of computers and was never interested in the coding and software end of it (other than general knowledge of coding and software, I basically was heavily drawn away from it). Unfortunately I ended up trying toward the field of Computer Forensics. I dropped out within the early first semester due to the fact that I realized I wasn't going to truly end up doing what I like, and that is what college is about to me. Right now I am 21 and not living on my own yet (I could if I wanted to, however i'd be strapped for cash and would never be advancing, which would close every door possible to me from here on out without a crazy luck-struck job with higher pay). I've built several computers for myself, family, and friends. I'm very tech savvy as a whole; My phone is modded to heck, my computer is always "under control" the way I want it to be, anything that needs to be known in terms of tech that my family needs - I'm the person they go to, you could throw a tech spec sheet at me and I can instantly assume what type of performance the device is going to get on certain apps. What can I do with this talent/enthusiasm or whatever you would like to call it?

I guess my questions are as such:

1. Is there something such as a computer hardware _____?

2. How would I be getting into that other than just general knowledge of computers? Does it require college? Should I be checking out rinky-dink computer shops to start out? Am I almost forced to own my own business in a computer sales area?

3. Is there any way of "getting through" the general education portion of colleges. I find this to be a HUGE waste of my time as a major amount of this knowledge I've been taught in HS and retain nearly all of it. When I first stepped into college I couldn't believe the amount of time being put into things already taught by my HS teachers and noticed how a lot of it would be largely irrelevant to me in the future of my career. I figured I could just deal with it when I first got into college, however after realizing I also needed to get into classes that was very largely about coding and app development I bailed quick.
Anonymous
March 20, 2012 6:08:09 AM

Anyone? D:
March 21, 2012 5:28:04 AM

1: I would ask your adviser what college can transfer your degree over. Here are an option for BS degrees to transfer and declare at Uni:

-Computer science
-Computer Engineering
-Electrical Engineering
-Electronics Engineering

These are just a few.

No, there is no such thing,( as far as I know of,) as a Computer Hardware Specialist/Engineer/Guru.

2: Are you wanting to work on computers or engineer them? Sounds like you want to build them...and when I mean build...I mean design, fabricate, and engineer at all levels.

3: CC is great to get your feet wet for Uni. One can appreciate the classes at at local junior college. Just get your GER's out of the way for a transfer to your choice of college. Depending where you live, find the closest State college to you of University. Both will provide hopefully with what you want to do. BTW, no matter what degree you get...as long as it is related to your degree, they can train you to do the work needed. They have no issue training you if you stay. Employers want to see you utilize all resources at full employment.
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