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reciver with line in jacks

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January 4, 2005 1:53:37 AM

is there any recivers with line in jacks?
if theres not that would be cool if there were recievers that could hook up to sound cards

More about : reciver line jacks

January 4, 2005 2:43:12 AM

Almost all of soundcards have a 3.5 mm line in jack, even the onboard one does have. I never heard any that doesn't.
January 4, 2005 8:09:01 AM

Uh, d00d, I had a Sherwood receier from 1967 with line in jacks. Any reasonably good receiver should have them. They normally have lables, like "Tape", "Auxiliary", "TV", and "CD". They're normally marked "Right" and Left" and newer receivers color code them red and white.

They are RCA connectors. All you need for connecting your PC to your receiver is an adapter cable, or an adapter block.

Back when CD players were extremely expensive, people used to connect portable players to their home stereos. This made "stereo minijack" to "stereo (2) RCA" cables popular, and they've been all over the market since. Normally you'll find them in stores in the 3-foot length which was handiest for connecting your diskman to your receiver back then.

So you just connect the line out from your computer to the line in on your stereo using an adapter cable. If you'd rather use a higher quality cable, an adapter block can be purchased from Radio Shack.

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January 5, 2005 3:26:35 PM

All receivers have "hine in" jacks, but very few have SPDIF or minijack inputs. If you're trying to run a minijack digital out from say a SB Audigy card to a Home Theatre receiver, you're S.O.L. It's stupid, I know, why they don't have a coaxial or fibre out on these cards is beyond me but that's the way it is right now. It's changing but I think they keep it this way to force you to buy their silly, crappy, proprietary speaker systems.

Da Worfster

If you don't stand for something, you'll fall for anything.
January 5, 2005 7:41:27 PM

Lol Crash, Sherwood were good back in 1967. Decent stuff or nice compared to what you can get now. Lots of crap out now.

I have an HH Scott intergrated amp in my bedroom. Plus some other vintaged audio items.

the Prisoner



I'm not a number, I'm a free man! :mad: 
January 6, 2005 12:15:13 AM

Most of the good digital receivers have either "digital coaxial" (S/P-DIF), "digital optical" (tosslink), or both.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
January 6, 2005 12:16:54 AM

I kept bragging to people about my home stereo, they'd laugh until they heard it. It was 40w per channel, using homemade speaker enclosures, with all drivers specifically choosen to maximize that 40w.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
January 6, 2005 3:00:43 AM

You can find some old Sherwoods for fairly cheap. I dont do receivers becuase I like to switch stuff around but you cant go wrong with an old Sherwood, HH Scott, Fisher and Marantz receivers before they all the companies got sold to Japan. Used, they cost about the same as the new stuff and sound sometimes so much better. 40 watts is plenty depending on the speaker. Those old speakers were loud on 8 watts tube amps!

My neighbor moved, and he had workshop almost as good as Norm on "This Old House", so no more speaker building for me at the moment. hehe

I'm going to try to build some amps.

the Prisoner

I'm not a number, I'm a free man! :mad: 
January 6, 2005 6:17:58 AM

My speakers were designed for low-power amps: 10" woofer 27-2000Hz 97db at 1w/1m, long throw (extended pole piece). Crossed over at 500Hz to a 5.25" midrange with similar specs, crossed over at 2500Hz to a 2.5" tweater with similar specs, with an 8-30khz piezo horn on top. The tweeter dropped off where the horn picked up (the sloped crossed nearly perfectly).

The cases were compact 12.5" wide, 20" high, 8" deep, designed specifically for those woofers of course, made of 3/4" high density fiber board, with the woofers countersunk 3/8" at the mounting point to make them sit flush. The horn was also countersunk to sit flush. The ports were amazingly short by specification, 2"x2", but I ended up extending them (tuned by ear) using a slip-over cardboard tube I sized for them.

The boxes were even radiused on the outside corners (1/2"), and the entire thing was primered, sanded, and coated with 8 layers of black laquor, then rubbed out. The end result was they looked like a solid, seemless cube, and weighed around 40lb!

As nice as they looked, the really impressive thing was, I'd sit them on my floor and make them walk across the room!

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
January 6, 2005 6:19:28 AM

Oh, and people quit laughing about me having "only 40W" when I made speakers that heavy walk across the room.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
January 7, 2005 11:58:55 AM

I like horns, but piezo's their a PezofS*hit.
Got some speapkers running off 8 watt tube amp, but my sub is got 1200 watts. hehe

I dont like all those crossovers.

My next project is an array speaker, 8 fullrange for mid, ribbon for highs and a sub on the side. No worrys on crossovers.

I like sealed cabinets the best, ported sound puffy.
It is fun to experiment though.

the Prisoner


I'm not a number, I'm a free man! :mad: 
January 7, 2005 11:45:09 PM

Piezos are fine for ultra-high pitched sounds. My 2.5" tweeter had a range to around 18kHz, but fell off around 15kHz. The piezo horn was fine for picking up the slack.

As for sealed cabinets, if you want a small enclosure, you pick a speaker that allows for it, and as you turn up the volume you LOOSE BASS! The LOUDER you crank it up the MORE it sounds like somoene packed a towel in front of the cone! The smaller the case, the more pronounced the effect. So for me, small enclosures and sealed cabinets don't mix, even if the thiel-small perameters say it's OK.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
January 11, 2005 6:07:05 PM

I have the room for the sealed. I agree a small sealed sub isnt good, though they are great for monitor speakers. The ported sound is too puffy for me, if you know what I mean. I made some subs like the HSU type, easy to make, not very GF/Wife friendly but she likes music. They sound great.

Piezo horn sounds are too metalic for my ears. I like more of the soft dome sound. Most of the metalic type tweeters sound bad for me, but I'm also sensative to high freq sound.

For horns I prefer the old Altec Lansing/Klipsh/JBL. They have to be the old ones. To tell you truth I havent heard any new horn drivers latley.

2.5" tweeter is large! I can see why you added an ultra high tweeter.

I have pretty much have gone to the passive crossover multi-amp setup for music. An amp for the tweeter, and amp for the mid and a separate sub.

Computer use for speakers is another matter.

I need to get my array speaker type project under way. I bought 24 4" fullrange drivers. It will be a baffle type( not cabinet) speaker with a ribbon doing the highs and subs for the lows.

the Prisoner


I'm not a number, I'm a free man! :mad: 
January 11, 2005 9:02:44 PM

Yes, 2.5" cone tweeters are large, and that IS the reason I added the horns. The reason I choose the 2.5" cone tweeters is because they matched the midranges perfectly, and the only disadvantage was the limited frequency range (18kHz rated, sloping off at 15kHz).

I listen to mostly rock, the horns added a lot of missing tones to things like symbols.

I had another set of speakers with extremely nice woofers, no midrange, and cloth dome tweeters. Those sounded nice as well, but I just built them out of factory made boxes (5/8" MDF).

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
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