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DCL24A by Sceptre 24"

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  • Flat Panel Monitors
  • LCD Monitor
  • Peripherals
  • Product
Last response: in Computer Peripherals
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September 24, 2007 6:44:05 PM

Hello all,

First time poster, and like everyone else I have a question that I would like to field out to the masses (and experts) alike. I'm looking at getting my first LCD monitor for Xmas, since there is so much non standard information I'm a little concerned with the end results.

This is the monitor I'm leaning towards (both because of price and stats).

DCL24A by Sceptre 24" Widescreen LCD Monitor

Display Type: Widescreen LCD
Viewable Screen Size: 24 inches
Display Colors: 16.7 million
Vertical Refresh Rate: N/A
Horizontal Frequency: N/A
Input Video Signal: 15-pin D-sub DVI-D
Audio Input: Mini Jack Audio In
Speakers: 2 x 2 Watt Speakers
Contrast Ratio: 4000:1(DC)
Brightness: 300 cd/m²
Horizontal Viewing Angle: 160 degrees
Response Time: 2 ms
Vertical Viewing Angle: 160 degrees
Maximum Resolution: 1920 x 1200
Cost About 440$ Canadian Dollars.

So as you can see I like the stats, but the issue is the fact that some of the Monitors reviewed on Toms site have advertised a certain 'ms' response and have been way off that mark. My THREE major concerns are these...
-How accurate is the listed '2ms' response?
-How true is the color reproduction?
-Is Scepter a decent brand, reliability, service, etc?

Anyone that can shed some light on this it would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks for your time.
K

More about : dcl24a sceptre

September 25, 2007 1:06:10 AM

It uses the inferior TN panel. While it is inexpensive and have fast response times it's color accuracy is below that of more expensive LCD panel tech; MVA/PVA and S-IPS.

There is no standard to how response time is measured. The stated response time is usually under ideal conditions. "2ms" monitor have been test with external hardware to be as slow as 20ms under certain conditions.

TN panels have traditionally been 6-bit panels instead of 8-bit panels, however there has been talk about Samsung will manufacture 8-bit TN panels, but that has not been confirmed. Without getting into the math 6-bit panels can only produce 262k "real" colors, thru a process called dithering where colors are blended together to make up the other 16 million colors.

In the past these panels have been advertised as having 16.2 million colors, but more recently they have been advertised as having 16.7 million colors to deceive consumers. But like I said 8-bit TN panels are rumored to go into production.

8-bit panels can truly produce 16.7 million colors. S-IPS panels are the best (an expensive), but you won't find one in the 24" category. In the US 24" 8-bit MVA/PVA monitors start at around $600.

September 26, 2007 3:57:28 AM

I get where your coming from in information and I appreciate the in depth response. I think this is the model 'they' have decided on for the Xmas gift, now the question is... "Will it be ok?"

http://ca.lge.com/en/products/model/detail/lcdmonitors_...

Is this the sub par panel? Does the 5ms response seem fake? Will it display colors correctly?

Again thanks to all whom have sent replies (posted here and PM's). Just trying to get a handle on all that is LCD... makes me miss the days of CRT.

K
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September 26, 2007 5:15:23 AM

All 22" LCD monitors use TN panels.

TN panels are great for gaming because they have fast response times (at least according to the specs), they are okay for watching movies and pretty bad for image editing (on a professional level).

The fastest 22" TN monitors are rated at 2ms. 5ms is still good, but considered "slow" in the 22" range.

Regarding the 24" monitor you mentioned before, TN panels are usually rated at 5ms. Not sure why 2ms was mentioned for that particular monitor.
September 26, 2007 2:37:40 PM

So what would I have to get in that 22" range if I wanted to get good color reproduction, for editing (PS, Max, Maya etc)? Cost is always an issue, and my Viewsonic is on its way out, so I do need a new monitor but really didn't know if leaving a CRT was the right choice.
Not that there is any other choice since most manufacturers have moved over to LCD with both barrels.
September 26, 2007 6:46:47 PM

There is in Europe a particular 22.1'' that is does not have a TN panel (to my knowledge the only non-TN 22''). It is a MVA based, professionally geared Eizo costing around 4500 Euros. That is around $6300 for you. Don't think that would interest you though...
September 26, 2007 10:29:42 PM

Way out of my playing field, but you are opening my eyes to the compromises that the companies are doing based on what they can sell to the public.
My concern is the fact that CRT's have done such a great job at reproducing colors and virtually no artifacts when high speed cinema and games are played.

So I guess I'll be jumping in with the LG and hoping that it does an adequate job at filling all my needs and not just excelling at one.

September 27, 2007 12:22:10 AM

Like I said all current 22" LCD monitors use TN panels. So you will have to deal with some form of color inaccuracy. However the following review of nine 22" LCDs should help you out:

22 inch LCD monitors: The second coming!

Your best bet is the Samsung 226BW "S" panel. However, there is a "panel lottery" where the 226BW can use be made with any of four different 22" panels from Samsung, AUO, CheMei, or CPT. There is no way to tell which one you receive unless you take it apart to see the sticker on the panel. Thus, voiding your warranty and ruining any chance of returning the monitor.

Your best bet is to go for the Dell E228WFP. However, Dell is also known for "panel lottery" as well, but I don't know if that applies to this particular Dell LCD monitor yet.

However, Lenovo (the company that bought out IBM's Thinkpad business) announced the Lenovo L220x as the first non TN 22" panel (for the consumer level market) and will arrive in November in the U.S. for an announced price of $550. Street price will be lower since that price almost competes with the 24" MVA/PVA monitors.

Lenovo does not specify if this is a MVA/PVA or IPS monitor, but my guess is on MVA/PVA since IPS tends to be expensive.
September 27, 2007 12:25:09 AM

realzeus said:
There is in Europe a particular 22.1'' that is does not have a TN panel (to my knowledge the only non-TN 22''). It is a MVA based, professionally geared Eizo costing around 4500 Euros. That is around $6300 for you. Don't think that would interest you though...



Actually, the Eizo ColorEdge CG221 sells for between $5,500 - $5,900 in the US and it is based on an S-IPS panel based on Eizo's published specifications. That would make sense 'cause no company would try to sell a MVA/PVA monitor that is geared towards the graphics professional at this price point.
September 27, 2007 7:16:34 PM

jaguarskx said:
Actually, the Eizo ColorEdge CG221 sells for between $5,500 - $5,900 in the US and it is based on an S-IPS panel based on Eizo's published specifications. That would make sense 'cause no company would try to sell a MVA/PVA monitor that is geared towards the graphics professional at this price point.



You are absolutely right sir, my mistake.

PS: I was wondering what kind of panel that new Lenovo will have since none of the big panel manufacturers make a 22'' MVA/PVA.
September 28, 2007 12:06:09 AM

I'm not sure. Time will tell.
!