Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Phone Recording to PC in UK

Tags:
  • Phones
  • Microsoft
  • Windows XP
Last response: in Windows XP
Share
Anonymous
July 14, 2005 11:57:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Hello,

I recently placed a post on the above subject, side tracking slightly and
this is probably not the place to post this question, I looked at a site
given in a response and found it informative, what does it mean in legal
terms when in the U.S. a Court or is it a Judge is refered to say as 5th
circuit?
--
Sandal

More about : phone recording

July 15, 2005 12:32:18 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Sandal wrote:

> Hello,
>
> I recently placed a post on the above subject, side tracking slightly
> and this is probably not the place to post this question, I looked at
> a site given in a response and found it informative, what does it mean
> in legal terms when in the U.S. a Court or is it a Judge is refered to
> say as 5th circuit?

Google is so great. I got this by using the search term, "define circuit
court judge". There are other links, too.

http://www.answers.com/topic/circuit-judge

Malke
--
MS-MVP Windows User/Shell
Elephant Boy Computers
www.elephantboycomputers.com
"Don't Panic"
Anonymous
July 15, 2005 12:53:01 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Hello Malke,

Thankyou for your response.
You are quite right, sometimes one doesn't always think Google, I'll try that.
Many thanks
--
Sandal


"Malke" wrote:

> Sandal wrote:
>
> > Hello,
> >
> > I recently placed a post on the above subject, side tracking slightly
> > and this is probably not the place to post this question, I looked at
> > a site given in a response and found it informative, what does it mean
> > in legal terms when in the U.S. a Court or is it a Judge is refered to
> > say as 5th circuit?
>
> Google is so great. I got this by using the search term, "define circuit
> court judge". There are other links, too.
>
> http://www.answers.com/topic/circuit-judge
>
> Malke
> --
> MS-MVP Windows User/Shell
> Elephant Boy Computers
> www.elephantboycomputers.com
> "Don't Panic"
>
Related resources
July 15, 2005 12:57:03 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Sandal wrote:

> Hello,
>
> I recently placed a post on the above subject, side tracking slightly and
> this is probably not the place to post this question, I looked at a site
> given in a response and found it informative, what does it mean in legal
> terms when in the U.S. a Court or is it a Judge is refered to say as 5th
> circuit?

In the US, Circuit courts are Courts of Appeal at the Federal Court
Level. The first level Federal Courts are district courts which rule on
issues of Federal Law. Decisions in cases tried in these courts can be
appealed to the Circuit Court of Appeals with jurisdiction over that
district court. There are 11 Circuit Courts of Appeals, ie the country
is divided into 11 geographic areas, along with the Court of Appeals for
the District of Columbia (DC Circuit) and the Court of Appeals for the
Federal Circuit. The largest Circuit, for example, is the 9th Circuit
which covers the states of Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho,
Montana, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington, as well as Guam and the
Northern Mariana Islands. Above the Circuit Courts of Appeals is the US
Supreme Court. There are also other specialized Federal Courts below
the Circuit Courts of Appeals.

Judges at the federal level are appointed to the bench in one of these
courts, so a judge appointed to the bench in the 5th Circuit Court of
Appeals would be commonly known as a 5th Circuit judge.

http://www.uscourts.gov/courtlinks/index.cfm

Each state also has it's own set of courts to deal with state laws in a
hierarchy including trial courts, appellate courts and a supreme court
for that state.

--
Rock
MS MVP Windows - Shell/User
Anonymous
July 15, 2005 1:37:01 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Hello Rock,

Thankyou for your response, well written, to the point and very much
appreciated.
Many thanks
--
Sandal


"Rock" wrote:

> Sandal wrote:
>
> > Hello,
> >
> > I recently placed a post on the above subject, side tracking slightly and
> > this is probably not the place to post this question, I looked at a site
> > given in a response and found it informative, what does it mean in legal
> > terms when in the U.S. a Court or is it a Judge is refered to say as 5th
> > circuit?
>
> In the US, Circuit courts are Courts of Appeal at the Federal Court
> Level. The first level Federal Courts are district courts which rule on
> issues of Federal Law. Decisions in cases tried in these courts can be
> appealed to the Circuit Court of Appeals with jurisdiction over that
> district court. There are 11 Circuit Courts of Appeals, ie the country
> is divided into 11 geographic areas, along with the Court of Appeals for
> the District of Columbia (DC Circuit) and the Court of Appeals for the
> Federal Circuit. The largest Circuit, for example, is the 9th Circuit
> which covers the states of Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho,
> Montana, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington, as well as Guam and the
> Northern Mariana Islands. Above the Circuit Courts of Appeals is the US
> Supreme Court. There are also other specialized Federal Courts below
> the Circuit Courts of Appeals.
>
> Judges at the federal level are appointed to the bench in one of these
> courts, so a judge appointed to the bench in the 5th Circuit Court of
> Appeals would be commonly known as a 5th Circuit judge.
>
> http://www.uscourts.gov/courtlinks/index.cfm
>
> Each state also has it's own set of courts to deal with state laws in a
> hierarchy including trial courts, appellate courts and a supreme court
> for that state.
>
> --
> Rock
> MS MVP Windows - Shell/User
>
>
Anonymous
July 15, 2005 3:43:21 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Sandal wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I recently placed a post on the above subject, side tracking slightly and
> this is probably not the place to post this question, I looked at a site
> given in a response and found it informative, what does it mean in legal
> terms when in the U.S. a Court or is it a Judge is refered to say as 5th
> circuit?

At one time the judges and clerks of "circuit courts" traveled from town
to town to try cases in each town. The route each court followed was a
"Circuit". With the availability of modern transportation many "Circuit"
courts now hold trials in a fixed location.

Some states in the US have multiple levels of courts. Some cases start
in a lower level court and progress to higher levels when the litigants
seek the opinion of a more experienced or higher regarded judge (or
panel of judges). Terminoligy describing these levels veries from state
to state, and may include "small claims", "juvinile and domestic
relations (divorces, child custody & juvinile crimes)", "family",
"district", "circuit", "appeals", "superior", "supreme (of state, county
or parish)" or other terms (not necessarily in that order).
Anonymous
July 15, 2005 3:43:22 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Hello RobertVA,

Thankyou for your response, clear, to the point and much appreciated.
Many thanks
--
Sandal


"RobertVA" wrote:

> Sandal wrote:
> > Hello,
> >
> > I recently placed a post on the above subject, side tracking slightly and
> > this is probably not the place to post this question, I looked at a site
> > given in a response and found it informative, what does it mean in legal
> > terms when in the U.S. a Court or is it a Judge is refered to say as 5th
> > circuit?
>
> At one time the judges and clerks of "circuit courts" traveled from town
> to town to try cases in each town. The route each court followed was a
> "Circuit". With the availability of modern transportation many "Circuit"
> courts now hold trials in a fixed location.
>
> Some states in the US have multiple levels of courts. Some cases start
> in a lower level court and progress to higher levels when the litigants
> seek the opinion of a more experienced or higher regarded judge (or
> panel of judges). Terminoligy describing these levels veries from state
> to state, and may include "small claims", "juvinile and domestic
> relations (divorces, child custody & juvinile crimes)", "family",
> "district", "circuit", "appeals", "superior", "supreme (of state, county
> or parish)" or other terms (not necessarily in that order).
>
Anonymous
July 15, 2005 7:35:09 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Sandal" <Sandal@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:80CD750D-F84E-4ABA-B86C-B48FF382E132@microsoft.com...
: Hello,
:
: I recently placed a post on the above subject, side tracking slightly and
: this is probably not the place to post this question, I looked at a site
: given in a response and found it informative, what does it mean in legal
: terms when in the U.S. a Court or is it a Judge is refered to say as 5th
: circuit?
: --
: Sandal

It must have some British foundation - 20 years ago, in a wonderful BBC
series 'Rumpole of the Bailey' one of the chamber's barristers was appointed
a Circuit Judge - a position referred to, with much hilarity, as a "Circus
Judge".

Read into that what you wish.
Anonymous
July 15, 2005 7:35:10 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Hello Oziebill,

Thank you for your response,

You may well be right.

If my history serves me correctly here in the UK during the 17th & 18th
century and up to fairly recent past we had travailing Courts ( circuit ),
Judges.

Now I'm made to think about it the Witch Hunt trials come to mind.

Maybe it was an export from us to the Americas, The Founding Fathers I mean.
--
Sandal


"Oziebill" wrote:

>
> "Sandal" <Sandal@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:80CD750D-F84E-4ABA-B86C-B48FF382E132@microsoft.com...
> : Hello,
> :
> : I recently placed a post on the above subject, side tracking slightly and
> : this is probably not the place to post this question, I looked at a site
> : given in a response and found it informative, what does it mean in legal
> : terms when in the U.S. a Court or is it a Judge is refered to say as 5th
> : circuit?
> : --
> : Sandal
>
> It must have some British foundation - 20 years ago, in a wonderful BBC
> series 'Rumpole of the Bailey' one of the chamber's barristers was appointed
> a Circuit Judge - a position referred to, with much hilarity, as a "Circus
> Judge".
>
> Read into that what you wish.
>
>
>
>
!