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Sadly another laptop graphics card upgrade question

Last response: in Laptops & Notebooks
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September 9, 2009 12:28:08 AM

I have a Compaq 6820s which, at the moment has a broken screen, and I'm using an external monitor. I know dozens of people have asked already about this, but I figure I'll ask if there is a possible upgrade for the graphics card anyway.

Currently, I'm pretty sure there is a PCI express x16 slot crammed in there (I know the laptop version is different from the PC), and it is currently using a mobility radeon x1350 dedicated card. I looked around, and apart from finding out about power consumption, and maybe actual size, a mobility radeon hd 2600 xt uses the same slot (from what I've read), and seems like it would be the best upgrade I could do (if it's even possible).

I don't know how BIOS would factor in, as I'm not exactly very sure about how the mobo works, so it would be nice to know this as well.

Finally, I know it's a crazy idea to switch the graphics, as it might be soldered in, and that a desktop is ALWAYS a better route, etc, so please don't bother mentioning (although, if one knows that the graphics are soldered in, mention anyway).

Thanks for the help.
September 9, 2009 2:32:31 PM

no x16 inside that laptop mate, all hps use built in graphics...
September 9, 2009 7:36:05 PM

I can see that as plausible, but if that's true, could you please explain what they mean by using the PCI bandwidth on the following page? It would make things a little less confusing.

http://ati.amd.com/products/MobilityRadeonx1350/index.h...

Also, when checking the hardware information for the mobility radeon x1350 (which is in the laptop), it specifically mentions that it's using a PCI express x16 slot, and that the x1350 is a dedicated card. If there's no slot, then what are they babbling about?
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September 9, 2009 7:40:37 PM

There's no question that the card uses a PCI-e interface of some kind - HP is not about to invent it's own bus just for it's notebooks. Whether it's in a slot, socket, or hard-soldered form and how much bandwidth it has is anyone's guess.

Why don't you just take your notebook apart and look at what's inside instead of blowing all your time speculating?
September 9, 2009 7:41:06 PM

Sorry, accidental double post (if anyone saw). Anyway, I can't take it apart yet (I just got it for free a few days ago off of someone who said it was useless and completely broken) as I don't have the tools, i.e. I have no screwdrivers of any kind. So I've been blowing my time speculating until I have the opportunity to blow my time taking the thing apart.
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