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Why the hate?

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Last response: in Other Consumer Electronics
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Why do you dislike Apple products?

Total: 4 votes

  • OS not compatible
  • 19 %
  • iCan't stand all the iCrap
  • 19 %
  • Way overpriced for what they are
  • 19 %
  • Too restrictive on the development front
  • 13 %
  • Support sucks
  • 13 %
  • All show, no go
  • 0 %
  • RAWR! APPLE SUX!!!!!@!12!@#
  • 7 %
  • Other (Please leave a response)
  • 7 %
  • I don't. They make products that do what I want them to do
  • 7 %
  • I don't. They're delicious and nutritious!
  • 0 %
February 19, 2010 9:31:24 PM

Simple question, yet not many people seem to know the root of their disdain for Apple products. Maybe this poll can shed some light?

I'd be interesting to see what other people thinking in this regard.

I know I don't like Apple products because
1)The OS on their computers is not compatible with the majority of the software I use, and I don't want to spend more time learning new programs
2)I know the computers are overpriced compared to similarly equipped PCs
3)I don't like companies that openly try to establish a monopoly (Stop! I know Microsoft appears to have the monopoly, but at least they want people to make software and hardware for their OS, and Linux is, of course, open-source good-times)
4)I'm tired of almost every company throwing a lowercase "i" in front of the name of their product to make it sound better than it really is (waiting for iCherrios, you know it's coming)
5)Support for their products almost always means sending it back to them (if you live out in BFE) or finding the nearest Apple Store
6)Their media players are fragile (I've seen quite a few literally get bent from being in pocket and forgotten)

However, I've been impressed by some of the things Apple's managed to do over recent years. They (almost) singlehandedly are responsible for the success of the MP3/PMP market and made sure it's here to stay for quite some time. They've proven that digital distribution channels for media works. They've managed to cram a lot of tech into an impressively small space. They set standards for the appearance of American-made gadgets, proving that even the US has good taste every now and then, not just Europe and Asia.
Most importantly (for me), they've kept the careers of quite a few comedians afloat, and provided an insurmountable amount of fodder for anyone with half a wit could easily spin into a quick laugh.

More about : hate

February 20, 2010 1:14:57 PM

I dislike them for the exact same reasons you mentioned. Also, I dislike them because they act like they're the first to make something every time they come out with something new and their followers act as Jobs is Jesus Christ himself.
Anonymous
February 20, 2010 10:31:51 PM

Trying to fix friends' Apple computers is frustrating. Many of the utilities and fixes that are available on the PC seem to be missing on Macs.

Networking is fine so long as it works but when things go wrong I have to resort to a Dell laptop because the tools I rely on at home are just not there on a Mac.

I guess it's a by-product of the original Mac brief to produce a computer that was as simple as an appliance like a toaster. It may look simple, but so would a car without a gearbox or steering wheel.

I've been astonished at how hard it was to simply play a music CD on an mid-90's Mac (I seem to recall the sound was off by default) and more recently how confusing it was to rip an audio CD -- some nonsense about the Library in iTunes. Wot is a Library ? Presumably a folder. Pretentious nonsense.

I occasionally have to use iTunes on my own computer, loading music to an iPod for neighbour who just can't fathom how to do it. iTunes ignores some basic Windows conventions. You can't sort songs by file date/time so grouping tracks as albums is impossible without some creative use of Windows Explorer. Otherwise, all the songs are dumped into one folder buried well down in the folder tree.

iTunes looks cool but it is far from obvious how you use it and underneath it's a mess. By contrast, I and friends use an ancient version of Roxio's Easy CD because it works in an intuitive manner almost from the moment you first see it.

As for the iPod, I like the design and the screen and the interface, but I simply will not buy hardware that presumes to tell me what I can or cannot do with my music. Ditto any device that sentences me to using the vile iTunes.


More annoyingly the philosophy that says "this isn't a computer, it's an extension of your creativity" means that the users have a willful refusal to learn anything practical about their machines and they treat those who know anything about computers with a sort of patronising disdain (even while they're begging for your help).


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