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resolution higher than native, how is it possible ?

Last response: in Computer Peripherals
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November 26, 2008 3:56:16 AM

Hi,

I have a hannspree Hf199h wide screen monitor that has a 1440 x 900 native resolution using the analog input.

It also has a HDMI (no dvi) input and I just got a Evga 9800gt card and a DVI 2 HDMI adapter. So now I'm using the HDMI input.

Curiously since I'm using the HDMI input I have the option to choose 3 more resolutions up to the full HD 1920 x 1080.
Of course I tried and the monitor seams to displaying the higher resolution without an apparent problem.
To be safe I'm back to the native resolution, but I'm wondering how is that possible ? Also can doing higher than the native resolution actually damage the monitor ?

Thanks
a c 195 C Monitor
November 26, 2008 3:14:18 PM

LCDs cannot go beyond native resolution. It is phyiscally impossible since due to the specific number of pixel.

What might be happening is the resolution is being down converted back to native resolution or it sets the "usable" desktop space to 1920 x 1080 (or whatever), but only 1440 x 900 is displayed at a time. You would need to scroll to view the rest of the "usable" desktop space.
November 26, 2008 6:15:35 PM

Will need to check this. But it doesn't seems its panning, my whole workspace is on the screen and everything is much smaller (like a regular resolution change).

jaguarskx said:
LCDs cannot go beyond native resolution. It is phyiscally impossible since due to the specific number of pixel.

What might be happening is the resolution is being down converted back to native resolution or it sets the "usable" desktop space to 1920 x 1080 (or whatever), but only 1440 x 900 is displayed at a time. You would need to scroll to view the rest of the "usable" desktop space.


a b C Monitor
November 26, 2008 9:23:27 PM

It's simply taking the higher input resolution and then downscaling it. You aren't actually gaining any resolution, as the monitor is still at native, it's just processing the image first to get it there.
!