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Dual Boot Question

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Anonymous
July 24, 2005 1:18:23 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

I know that the generally accepted method for Dual Boot is to load
Win98 on C, then WinXP on D.

However, C is faster than D because it occupies the outer portion of
the drive platters. Therefore I have already installed XP on C and it
is formatted with FAT32.

Having installed XP first on C drive goes counter to everything I have
read on dual-boot, so it may be too late for this, but at this point
is there a way to:

1) install another instance of XP on D drive and dual boot to a
screen that allows me to boot to either XP on C, or XP on D ?? This
is my preferred setup, because I want to put my video apps on C (the
fast partition) and run XP there when doing Adobe Photoshop, Premiere,
etc - and then put my Business apps on D where speed is not
important (Word, Excel, Outlook, etc).

2) if (1) is impossible, can I instead install Win98 on D drive and
dual boot to a screen that allows me to boot to either XP on C, or
Win98 on D ??

More about : dual boot question

Anonymous
July 24, 2005 1:18:24 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Why install a second copy of XP? Installing a second copy would require
another license and I don't know if there would be any problems with the
activation of it.

Why not just leave the current install on C:\, load your video apps on C:\,
and then load your business apps on D:\. Most install programs will let you
choose the location at which they'll be installed.

As an aside, it appears that you've got a C and a D partition on one
physical hard drive. If so, you probably won't notice the difference in
speed. Also, with the XP on C, your speed will be better than if your XP was
on D.

As for the Win98 question - you can dual boot to 98, it's just a bit more
difficult if you don't install it first. The reason for this is that 98
can't see XP and make adjustments for it, while XP can see 98 and can make
the needed adjustments.

Here's a link to the dual boot thingie:
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q217210

The part that you're looking for is about 1/2 the way down, buried in some
gobbledygook. Here's what it says:

How to Install Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me in a Windows XP,
Windows 2000, and MS-DOS, or a Windows NT and MS-DOS Multiple-Boot
Configuration

"Ken Roberts" wrote:

> I know that the generally accepted method for Dual Boot is to load
> Win98 on C, then WinXP on D.
>
> However, C is faster than D because it occupies the outer portion of
> the drive platters. Therefore I have already installed XP on C and it
> is formatted with FAT32.
>
> Having installed XP first on C drive goes counter to everything I have
> read on dual-boot, so it may be too late for this, but at this point
> is there a way to:
>
> 1) install another instance of XP on D drive and dual boot to a
> screen that allows me to boot to either XP on C, or XP on D ?? This
> is my preferred setup, because I want to put my video apps on C (the
> fast partition) and run XP there when doing Adobe Photoshop, Premiere,
> etc - and then put my Business apps on D where speed is not
> important (Word, Excel, Outlook, etc).
>
> 2) if (1) is impossible, can I instead install Win98 on D drive and
> dual boot to a screen that allows me to boot to either XP on C, or
> Win98 on D ??
>
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 1:18:24 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

I have never noticed one partition to be any faster than
another partition when multiple operating systems
are installed. Visit www.pcpitstop.com and run the
test.

How do I install Windows 98/Me after I've installed XP?
http://www.dougknox.com/xp/tips/xp_repair_9x.htm

--
Carey Frisch
Microsoft MVP
Windows XP - Shell/User
Microsoft Newsgroups

Get Windows XP Service Pack 2 with Advanced Security Technologies:
http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/protect/window...

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Ken Roberts" wrote:

| I know that the generally accepted method for Dual Boot is to load
| Win98 on C, then WinXP on D.
|
| However, C is faster than D because it occupies the outer portion of
| the drive platters. Therefore I have already installed XP on C and it
| is formatted with FAT32.
|
| Having installed XP first on C drive goes counter to everything I have
| read on dual-boot, so it may be too late for this, but at this point
| is there a way to:
|
| 1) install another instance of XP on D drive and dual boot to a
| screen that allows me to boot to either XP on C, or XP on D ?? This
| is my preferred setup, because I want to put my video apps on C (the
| fast partition) and run XP there when doing Adobe Photoshop, Premiere,
| etc - and then put my Business apps on D where speed is not
| important (Word, Excel, Outlook, etc).
|
| 2) if (1) is impossible, can I instead install Win98 on D drive and
| dual boot to a screen that allows me to boot to either XP on C, or
| Win98 on D ??
Related resources
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 1:18:25 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Oops! Forgot the link to editing the boot.ini file (so you can change the
boot menu from reading MS-DOS to Windows 98.

Here's the link:
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;289022

"usasma" wrote:

> Why install a second copy of XP? Installing a second copy would require
> another license and I don't know if there would be any problems with the
> activation of it.
>
> Why not just leave the current install on C:\, load your video apps on C:\,
> and then load your business apps on D:\. Most install programs will let you
> choose the location at which they'll be installed.
>
> As an aside, it appears that you've got a C and a D partition on one
> physical hard drive. If so, you probably won't notice the difference in
> speed. Also, with the XP on C, your speed will be better than if your XP was
> on D.
>
> As for the Win98 question - you can dual boot to 98, it's just a bit more
> difficult if you don't install it first. The reason for this is that 98
> can't see XP and make adjustments for it, while XP can see 98 and can make
> the needed adjustments.
>
> Here's a link to the dual boot thingie:
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q217210
>
> The part that you're looking for is about 1/2 the way down, buried in some
> gobbledygook. Here's what it says:
>
> How to Install Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me in a Windows XP,
> Windows 2000, and MS-DOS, or a Windows NT and MS-DOS Multiple-Boot
> Configuration
>
> "Ken Roberts" wrote:
>
> > I know that the generally accepted method for Dual Boot is to load
> > Win98 on C, then WinXP on D.
> >
> > However, C is faster than D because it occupies the outer portion of
> > the drive platters. Therefore I have already installed XP on C and it
> > is formatted with FAT32.
> >
> > Having installed XP first on C drive goes counter to everything I have
> > read on dual-boot, so it may be too late for this, but at this point
> > is there a way to:
> >
> > 1) install another instance of XP on D drive and dual boot to a
> > screen that allows me to boot to either XP on C, or XP on D ?? This
> > is my preferred setup, because I want to put my video apps on C (the
> > fast partition) and run XP there when doing Adobe Photoshop, Premiere,
> > etc - and then put my Business apps on D where speed is not
> > important (Word, Excel, Outlook, etc).
> >
> > 2) if (1) is impossible, can I instead install Win98 on D drive and
> > dual boot to a screen that allows me to boot to either XP on C, or
> > Win98 on D ??
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 1:24:50 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

For installing Windows 98 to another drive, AFTER Windows XP is installed your C:\ drive,
which is formatted FAT32, look here:

http://www.dougknox.com/xp/tips/xp_repair_9x.htm
--

T.C.
t__cruise@[NoSpam]hotmail.com
Remove [NoSpam] to reply



<Ken Roberts> wrote in message news:bo47e1d6jft48i85c9dttq3f9a92tccoks@4ax.com...
> I know that the generally accepted method for Dual Boot is to load
> Win98 on C, then WinXP on D.
>
> However, C is faster than D because it occupies the outer portion of
> the drive platters. Therefore I have already installed XP on C and it
> is formatted with FAT32.
>
> Having installed XP first on C drive goes counter to everything I have
> read on dual-boot, so it may be too late for this, but at this point
> is there a way to:
>
> 1) install another instance of XP on D drive and dual boot to a
> screen that allows me to boot to either XP on C, or XP on D ?? This
> is my preferred setup, because I want to put my video apps on C (the
> fast partition) and run XP there when doing Adobe Photoshop, Premiere,
> etc - and then put my Business apps on D where speed is not
> important (Word, Excel, Outlook, etc).
>
> 2) if (1) is impossible, can I instead install Win98 on D drive and
> dual boot to a screen that allows me to boot to either XP on C, or
> Win98 on D ??
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 4:56:27 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Here is what I have on my main machine.

Partition 1 = Windows XP on 20 gig
Partition 2 = Windows 2000 on 10 gig
Partition 3 = DOS on 75 meg

I installed in this order: Windows XP, Windows 2000, DOS

Everything works fine because:

1. All three partitions are "primary" partitions

2. Before installing Windows XP, I used Partition Magic to hide 2 and 3 and
to make partition 1 active. Partition 1 thinks it is drive C:

3. Installed Windows XP

4. Booted up with PM. Made partition 2 active. Hide partitions 1 and 3.
Partition 2 now thinks that "it" is drive C:

5. Install Windows 2000

6. Boot up with PM. Make partition 3 active. Hide partition 1 and 2.
Partition 3 thinks "it" is drive C:

7. Install DOS

8. Install boot loader program in DOS partition

9. Use boot loader program to hide the 2 primary partition that are not
being booted into from the operating system that you ARE booting into.

Therefore, each operating system you boot into thinks IT is on drive C: and
does not even see the other operating system partitions. Yes, the hidden
partitions are visible in disk management, and can be deleted from there -
so be careful!



--
Regards,

Richard Urban
Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User

Quote from: George Ankner
"If you knew as much as you thought you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!"

<Ken Roberts> wrote in message
news:bo47e1d6jft48i85c9dttq3f9a92tccoks@4ax.com...
>I know that the generally accepted method for Dual Boot is to load
> Win98 on C, then WinXP on D.
>
> However, C is faster than D because it occupies the outer portion of
> the drive platters. Therefore I have already installed XP on C and it
> is formatted with FAT32.
>
> Having installed XP first on C drive goes counter to everything I have
> read on dual-boot, so it may be too late for this, but at this point
> is there a way to:
>
> 1) install another instance of XP on D drive and dual boot to a
> screen that allows me to boot to either XP on C, or XP on D ?? This
> is my preferred setup, because I want to put my video apps on C (the
> fast partition) and run XP there when doing Adobe Photoshop, Premiere,
> etc - and then put my Business apps on D where speed is not
> important (Word, Excel, Outlook, etc).
>
> 2) if (1) is impossible, can I instead install Win98 on D drive and
> dual boot to a screen that allows me to boot to either XP on C, or
> Win98 on D ??
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 10:22:43 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

(My comments are inline)

On Sun, 24 Jul 2005 09:18:23 -0400, Ken Roberts <> wrote:

>I know that the generally accepted method for Dual Boot is to load
>Win98 on C, then WinXP on D.

Not exactly. If the both drives are FAT32 ones -- you can install Win98
on D, then WinXP on C. There will be only a few Win98 files (less that
1MB total) in the root of C: drive then.

>However, C is faster than D because it occupies the outer portion of
>the drive platters. Therefore I have already installed XP on C and it
>is formatted with FAT32.
>
>Having installed XP first on C drive goes counter to everything I have
>read on dual-boot, so it may be too late for this, but at this point
>is there a way to:
>
>1) install another instance of XP on D drive and dual boot to a
>screen that allows me to boot to either XP on C, or XP on D ?? This
>is my preferred setup, because I want to put my video apps on C (the
>fast partition) and run XP there when doing Adobe Photoshop, Premiere,
>etc - and then put my Business apps on D where speed is not
>important (Word, Excel, Outlook, etc).

If you don't need Win98 -- you can do that with no problems if WinXP is
not an OEM version. I can't understand still, why you do need two
versions of WinXP (you can put almost any application, including MS
Office, wherever you want if to select non-automatic installation; say,
you can create manually "Program Files" folder on D: drive, and point to
this folder as to the base folder while installation) -- but that is
your choice.

>2) if (1) is impossible, can I instead install Win98 on D drive and
>dual boot to a screen that allows me to boot to either XP on C, or
>Win98 on D ??

Win98 retail installation disk does see WinXP loader -- and adds Win98
as the second operating system to Boot.ini as the default system. You
can change the default system later.

--
Mikhail Zhilin
MS MVP (Windows - Shell/User)
http://www.aha.ru/~mwz
Sorry, no technical support by e-mail.
Please reply to the newsgroups only.
======
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 10:42:29 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

The plan is funadamentally flawed. 98 MUST be on c:.
"usasma" <usasma@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:E042DD12-AFCC-47D2-B86B-BB54BF7875FC@microsoft.com...
> Oops! Forgot the link to editing the boot.ini file (so you can change the
> boot menu from reading MS-DOS to Windows 98.
>
> Here's the link:
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;289022
>
> "usasma" wrote:
>
>> Why install a second copy of XP? Installing a second copy would require
>> another license and I don't know if there would be any problems with the
>> activation of it.
>>
>> Why not just leave the current install on C:\, load your video apps on
>> C:\,
>> and then load your business apps on D:\. Most install programs will let
>> you
>> choose the location at which they'll be installed.
>>
>> As an aside, it appears that you've got a C and a D partition on one
>> physical hard drive. If so, you probably won't notice the difference in
>> speed. Also, with the XP on C, your speed will be better than if your XP
>> was
>> on D.
>>
>> As for the Win98 question - you can dual boot to 98, it's just a bit more
>> difficult if you don't install it first. The reason for this is that 98
>> can't see XP and make adjustments for it, while XP can see 98 and can
>> make
>> the needed adjustments.
>>
>> Here's a link to the dual boot thingie:
>> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q217210
>>
>> The part that you're looking for is about 1/2 the way down, buried in
>> some
>> gobbledygook. Here's what it says:
>>
>> How to Install Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me in a Windows XP,
>> Windows 2000, and MS-DOS, or a Windows NT and MS-DOS Multiple-Boot
>> Configuration
>>
>> "Ken Roberts" wrote:
>>
>> > I know that the generally accepted method for Dual Boot is to load
>> > Win98 on C, then WinXP on D.
>> >
>> > However, C is faster than D because it occupies the outer portion of
>> > the drive platters. Therefore I have already installed XP on C and it
>> > is formatted with FAT32.
>> >
>> > Having installed XP first on C drive goes counter to everything I have
>> > read on dual-boot, so it may be too late for this, but at this point
>> > is there a way to:
>> >
>> > 1) install another instance of XP on D drive and dual boot to a
>> > screen that allows me to boot to either XP on C, or XP on D ?? This
>> > is my preferred setup, because I want to put my video apps on C (the
>> > fast partition) and run XP there when doing Adobe Photoshop, Premiere,
>> > etc - and then put my Business apps on D where speed is not
>> > important (Word, Excel, Outlook, etc).
>> >
>> > 2) if (1) is impossible, can I instead install Win98 on D drive and
>> > dual boot to a screen that allows me to boot to either XP on C, or
>> > Win98 on D ??
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 10:48:05 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

98 MUST be on C:. It is not a flexible option with that OS like with the NT
family.


"Mikhail Zhilin" <mwz@x.REMOVEx.aha.ru> wrote in message
news:1197e1d91v2gmqd6mgorl5ecbmgdcackbq@4ax.com...
> (My comments are inline)
>
> On Sun, 24 Jul 2005 09:18:23 -0400, Ken Roberts <> wrote:
>
>>I know that the generally accepted method for Dual Boot is to load
>>Win98 on C, then WinXP on D.
>
> Not exactly. If the both drives are FAT32 ones -- you can install Win98
> on D, then WinXP on C. There will be only a few Win98 files (less that
> 1MB total) in the root of C: drive then.
>
>>However, C is faster than D because it occupies the outer portion of
>>the drive platters. Therefore I have already installed XP on C and it
>>is formatted with FAT32.
>>
>>Having installed XP first on C drive goes counter to everything I have
>>read on dual-boot, so it may be too late for this, but at this point
>>is there a way to:
>>
>>1) install another instance of XP on D drive and dual boot to a
>>screen that allows me to boot to either XP on C, or XP on D ?? This
>>is my preferred setup, because I want to put my video apps on C (the
>>fast partition) and run XP there when doing Adobe Photoshop, Premiere,
>>etc - and then put my Business apps on D where speed is not
>>important (Word, Excel, Outlook, etc).
>
> If you don't need Win98 -- you can do that with no problems if WinXP is
> not an OEM version. I can't understand still, why you do need two
> versions of WinXP (you can put almost any application, including MS
> Office, wherever you want if to select non-automatic installation; say,
> you can create manually "Program Files" folder on D: drive, and point to
> this folder as to the base folder while installation) -- but that is
> your choice.
>
>>2) if (1) is impossible, can I instead install Win98 on D drive and
>>dual boot to a screen that allows me to boot to either XP on C, or
>>Win98 on D ??
>
> Win98 retail installation disk does see WinXP loader -- and adds Win98
> as the second operating system to Boot.ini as the default system. You
> can change the default system later.
>
> --
> Mikhail Zhilin
> MS MVP (Windows - Shell/User)
> http://www.aha.ru/~mwz
> Sorry, no technical support by e-mail.
> Please reply to the newsgroups only.
> ======
Anonymous
July 25, 2005 1:37:59 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Richard Urban [MVP]" wrote:
> Here is what I have on my main machine.
>
> Partition 1 = Windows XP on 20 gig
> Partition 2 = Windows 2000 on 10 gig
> Partition 3 = DOS on 75 meg
>
> I installed in this order: Windows XP, Windows 2000, DOS
>
> Everything works fine because:
>
> 1. All three partitions are "primary" partitions
>
> 2. Before installing Windows XP, I used Partition Magic to hide 2 and 3 and
> to make partition 1 active. Partition 1 thinks it is drive C:
>
> 3. Installed Windows XP
>
> 4. Booted up with PM. Made partition 2 active. Hide partitions 1 and 3.
> Partition 2 now thinks that "it" is drive C:


What do you mean by "Booted up with PM?"

Why couldn't you just direct the Win2000 installation CD
to install Win2000 to partition 2? Why did you have to
hide partition 1 and 3?

How does a partition "think" if there is no OS on it?

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
July 25, 2005 4:54:52 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

=?Utf-8?B?dXNhc21h?= <usasma@discussions.microsoft.com> writes:
>Why install a second copy of XP?

Well, for one thing, a person might have two substantially different
setups needed to run two different programs.

For example, I have two different companies urinating on each other.
One refuses to be compatible with Sun Java VM and must have MS Java
VM or fails. The other company is exactly the opposite. So I have
two copies of XP, one in each partition, each with their own silly
configuration satisfied. And I just reboot into the needed partition
to be able to get work done.

>Installing a second copy would require another license and I don't
>know if there would be any problems with the activation of it.

Nope, wrong. Install your XP CD in one partition, activate as usual.
Stick the same CD right back in, install XP in the other partition,
activate as usual, activation goes right through without any complaint.

(This is because ALL the critical items that are checked to confirm
that they are the same and this is legal and that you haven't tried
to install one copy on multiple different machines are EXACTLY THE SAME,
because it is on the SAME machine)

Actually I came up with this because very very early in the release
of XP there was a Microsoft written document that said "you might
find it useful to have more than one installation of XP, if for
example you need to have multiple different configurations." I have
tried to find that document a couple of times since that time and
have not found the right combination of keywords to use. But it
gave all the details about how to have multiple installations.

If someone can dig up that document again I'd love to see it.
Anonymous
July 25, 2005 4:54:53 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Don Taylor" wrote:
> <usasma@discussions.microsoft.com> writes:
>>Installing a second copy would require another license and I don't
>>know if there would be any problems with the activation of it.
>
> Nope, wrong. Install your XP CD in one partition, activate as usual.
> Stick the same CD right back in, install XP in the other partition,
> activate as usual, activation goes right through without any complaint.
>
> (This is because ALL the critical items that are checked to confirm
> that they are the same and this is legal and that you haven't tried
> to install one copy on multiple different machines are EXACTLY THE SAME,
> because it is on the SAME machine)


I am of the opinion that two installations of WinXP in the
same machine under one license is legal, but I don't think
it has ever been tested in court. As far as Microsoft is
concerned, though, it is a violation of their EULA and therefore
by their own self-serving definition "illegal".

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
July 25, 2005 6:59:36 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> writes:
>"Don Taylor" wrote:
>> <usasma@discussions.microsoft.com> writes:
>>>Installing a second copy would require another license and I don't
>>>know if there would be any problems with the activation of it.
>>
>> Nope, wrong. Install your XP CD in one partition, activate as usual.
>> Stick the same CD right back in, install XP in the other partition,
>> activate as usual, activation goes right through without any complaint.
>>
>> (This is because ALL the critical items that are checked to confirm
>> that they are the same and this is legal and that you haven't tried
>> to install one copy on multiple different machines are EXACTLY THE SAME,
>> because it is on the SAME machine)

> I am of the opinion that two installations of WinXP in the
> same machine under one license is legal, but I don't think
> it has ever been tested in court. As far as Microsoft is
> concerned, though, it is a violation of their EULA and therefore
> by their own self-serving definition "illegal".

People have screamed their opposing positions on this question
at each other over and over and over and over, in this group
and in others, for a long time. Google can confirm this if you
can think of appropriate keywords to use to search and find the
arguments. It is my opinion that you aren't going to make
anybody happy with this subject.
July 25, 2005 9:40:18 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote in message
news:UPOdnc0eyZrb8XnfRVn-iA@comcast.com...
> "Richard Urban [MVP]" wrote:
>> Here is what I have on my main machine.
>>
>> Partition 1 = Windows XP on 20 gig
>> Partition 2 = Windows 2000 on 10 gig
>> Partition 3 = DOS on 75 meg
>>
>> I installed in this order: Windows XP, Windows 2000, DOS
>>
>> Everything works fine because:
>>
>> 1. All three partitions are "primary" partitions
>>
>> 2. Before installing Windows XP, I used Partition Magic to hide 2 and 3
>> and to make partition 1 active. Partition 1 thinks it is drive C:
>>
>> 3. Installed Windows XP
>>
>> 4. Booted up with PM. Made partition 2 active. Hide partitions 1 and 3.
>> Partition 2 now thinks that "it" is drive C:
> What do you mean by "Booted up with PM?"
> Why couldn't you just direct the Win2000 installation CD
> to install Win2000 to partition 2? Why did you have to
> hide partition 1 and 3?
> How does a partition "think" if there is no OS on it?

I have WinME and WinXP on one hard drive, with data and video files on a
second hard drive.
Using Partition Magic, both OS are on "C" drive (HD 1) and each "C" is
hidden from each other.
During installation of OS you "boot with Partition Magic floppies" and make
a partition "active" to install the OS.
Afterwards you use a Boot Manager (Boot Magic comes with Partition Magic) to
start whichever OS you want to use.
So far I have partitions on HD 1 :
"C" - WinME
"C' - WinXP
"E" - Data
Partitions on HD 2 :
"D" - Data and Back Up
"F" - Video files (NTFS)
The "C" partitions are hidden from each other in Explorer, helping to avoid
accidental file contamination between OS, however Partition Magic can see
all the partitions (If you really have to mess with one OS while in
another.)
Anonymous
July 25, 2005 11:49:21 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

On Sun, 24 Jul 2005 18:48:05 -0400, "Manny Borges"
<manny_borges@hotmail.com> wrote:

>98 MUST be on C:. It is not a flexible option with that OS like with the NT
>family.

That's wrong. Win98 must _boot_ from FAT12/FAT16/FAT32 drive, that takes
C: letter, and where Win98 bootable files reside (ca. 250 kilobytes
only: msdos.sys, io.sys, and -- if need -- config.sys and autoexec.bat).

But the main Win98 folder, as well as Program Files folder, can be then
at any drive with FAT16/FAT32. If it is, say, E: drive -- the beginning
of msdos.sys will reflect that as:

[Paths]
HostWinBootDrv=E
WinBootDir=E:\WINDOWS
WinDir=E:\WINDOWS

--
Mikhail Zhilin
MS MVP (Windows - Shell/User)
http://www.aha.ru/~mwz
Sorry, no technical support by e-mail.
Please reply to the newsgroups only.
======

>"Mikhail Zhilin" <mwz@x.REMOVEx.aha.ru> wrote in message
>news:1197e1d91v2gmqd6mgorl5ecbmgdcackbq@4ax.com...
>> (My comments are inline)
>>
>> On Sun, 24 Jul 2005 09:18:23 -0400, Ken Roberts <> wrote:
>>
>>>I know that the generally accepted method for Dual Boot is to load
>>>Win98 on C, then WinXP on D.
>>
>> Not exactly. If the both drives are FAT32 ones -- you can install Win98
>> on D, then WinXP on C. There will be only a few Win98 files (less that
>> 1MB total) in the root of C: drive then.
>>
>>>However, C is faster than D because it occupies the outer portion of
>>>the drive platters. Therefore I have already installed XP on C and it
>>>is formatted with FAT32.
>>>
>>>Having installed XP first on C drive goes counter to everything I have
>>>read on dual-boot, so it may be too late for this, but at this point
>>>is there a way to:
>>>
>>>1) install another instance of XP on D drive and dual boot to a
>>>screen that allows me to boot to either XP on C, or XP on D ?? This
>>>is my preferred setup, because I want to put my video apps on C (the
>>>fast partition) and run XP there when doing Adobe Photoshop, Premiere,
>>>etc - and then put my Business apps on D where speed is not
>>>important (Word, Excel, Outlook, etc).
>>
>> If you don't need Win98 -- you can do that with no problems if WinXP is
>> not an OEM version. I can't understand still, why you do need two
>> versions of WinXP (you can put almost any application, including MS
>> Office, wherever you want if to select non-automatic installation; say,
>> you can create manually "Program Files" folder on D: drive, and point to
>> this folder as to the base folder while installation) -- but that is
>> your choice.
>>
>>>2) if (1) is impossible, can I instead install Win98 on D drive and
>>>dual boot to a screen that allows me to boot to either XP on C, or
>>>Win98 on D ??
>>
>> Win98 retail installation disk does see WinXP loader -- and adds Win98
>> as the second operating system to Boot.ini as the default system. You
>> can change the default system later.
>>
>> --
>> Mikhail Zhilin
>> MS MVP (Windows - Shell/User)
>> http://www.aha.ru/~mwz
>> Sorry, no technical support by e-mail.
>> Please reply to the newsgroups only.
>> ======
>
Anonymous
July 26, 2005 12:37:49 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

AFAIK it is against the EULA and it is reccommended by MS. Try pinning them down on it.

--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://webdiary.smh.com.au/archives/_comment/001075.htm...
=================================================
"Don Taylor" <dont@agora.rdrop.com> wrote in message news:69adneI2evt1BnnfRVn-jg@scnresearch.com...
> "Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> writes:
>>"Don Taylor" wrote:
>>> <usasma@discussions.microsoft.com> writes:
>>>>Installing a second copy would require another license and I don't
>>>>know if there would be any problems with the activation of it.
>>>
>>> Nope, wrong. Install your XP CD in one partition, activate as usual.
>>> Stick the same CD right back in, install XP in the other partition,
>>> activate as usual, activation goes right through without any complaint.
>>>
>>> (This is because ALL the critical items that are checked to confirm
>>> that they are the same and this is legal and that you haven't tried
>>> to install one copy on multiple different machines are EXACTLY THE SAME,
>>> because it is on the SAME machine)
>
>> I am of the opinion that two installations of WinXP in the
>> same machine under one license is legal, but I don't think
>> it has ever been tested in court. As far as Microsoft is
>> concerned, though, it is a violation of their EULA and therefore
>> by their own self-serving definition "illegal".
>
> People have screamed their opposing positions on this question
> at each other over and over and over and over, in this group
> and in others, for a long time. Google can confirm this if you
> can think of appropriate keywords to use to search and find the
> arguments. It is my opinion that you aren't going to make
> anybody happy with this subject.
Anonymous
July 26, 2005 12:37:50 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"David Candy" <.> writes:
>AFAIK it is against the EULA and it is reccommended by MS. Try pinning =
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>them down on it.

AFAYK can you provide a pointer to the documents that I've once seen
where this was described by MS? Material written by them would be so
much more helpful than opinions by everybody else.

Thank you

>"Don Taylor" <dont@agora.rdrop.com> wrote in message =
>news:69adneI2evt1BnnfRVn-jg@scnresearch.com...
>> "Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> writes:
>>>"Don Taylor" wrote:
>>>> <usasma@discussions.microsoft.com> writes:
>>>>>Installing a second copy would require another license and I don't
>>>>>know if there would be any problems with the activation of it.
>>>>=20
>>>> Nope, wrong. Install your XP CD in one partition, activate as =
>usual.
>>>> Stick the same CD right back in, install XP in the other partition,
>>>> activate as usual, activation goes right through without any =
>complaint.
>>>>=20
>>>> (This is because ALL the critical items that are checked to confirm
>>>> that they are the same and this is legal and that you haven't tried
>>>> to install one copy on multiple different machines are EXACTLY THE =
>SAME,
>>>> because it is on the SAME machine)
>>=20
>>> I am of the opinion that two installations of WinXP in the
>>> same machine under one license is legal, but I don't think
>>> it has ever been tested in court. As far as Microsoft is
>>> concerned, though, it is a violation of their EULA and therefore
>>> by their own self-serving definition "illegal".
>>=20
>> People have screamed their opposing positions on this question
>> at each other over and over and over and over, in this group
>> and in others, for a long time. Google can confirm this if you
>> can think of appropriate keywords to use to search and find the
>> arguments. It is my opinion that you aren't going to make
>> anybody happy with this subject.
Anonymous
July 26, 2005 7:56:53 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Search on parallel instalation (I would but I can't spell it - spell checking came to the rescue.). Also re downgrade rights with XP Pro. Plus there was a thread that Mike Brannigan and myself were in re downgrade rights and use of CD (thus breaching the explicit EULA) which is somewhat related in concept but it has disappeared from google. All I can find is posts by me refering to it - but I forget my records, hang on while I search. At the end of KB but still can't find it in google. It doesn't have MB reply of course in my sent posts.
How and Why to Perform a Parallel Installation of Windows NT 4.0

Q259003


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The information in this article applies to:

a.. Microsoft Windows NT Workstation version 4.0
b.. Microsoft Windows NT Server version 4.0
c.. Microsoft Windows NT Server, Enterprise Edition version 4.0

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


SUMMARY
This article describes steps and recommendations for performing a parallel installation of Windows NT 4.0. A parallel installation of the operating system is an installation to the same drive and volume as an existing installation of Windows NT, with the difference being the name of the operating system folder.

You can perform a parallel installation when you are using an installation of Windows NT 4.0 for testing or debugging, or when the operating system cannot be started. In the case of troubleshooting an installation that cannot be started, if the file system is FAT, it is possible to boot from an MS-DOS boot disk and gain access to the files. However, if the file system is NTFS, you cannot gain access to the file system using a boot disk.

You should perform the procedure listed in this article as a last resort. You should examine and address any problems you encounter during this process. Changes made to the file system during a parallel installation of Windows NT 4.0 could result in permanent loss of data.



MORE INFORMATION
The procedure described in this article applies equally to Windows NT Workstation and Windows NT Server, except where noted.

NOTE: During the installation process, if at any time a message is displayed stating that files being copied are older than what is on the system, choose the option to not overwrite the files.

The minimum disk requirement for installing Windows NT Server is 125 MB. If the system is very low on disk space (for example, less than 100 MB), the installation is unsuccessful. However, you can proceed with Setup and it calculates how much disk space is needed for the installation, based on your selections. If there is not enough space for a parallel installation, you can add another drive to the computer temporarily, and then perform the parallel installation on the temporary drive.

Performing a Parallel Installation
To perform a parallel installation of Windows NT, use the following steps:
1.. Start the computer either from the Windows NT 4.0 disks or the Windows NT 4.0 CD-ROM.

NOTE: If you need to install an additional SCSI driver, refer to the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article for the steps on installing an additional driver during Setup:
Q158568 Installing Retired or Third-Party SCSI Drivers During Setup
Otherwise, Windows NT Setup loads drivers and continues until the following message is displayed:


Welcome to Setup.

The Setup program for the Microsoft(R) Windows NT(TM) operating system version 4.0 prepares Windows NT to run on your computer.


a.. To learn more about Windows NT Setup before continuing, press F1.


b.. To set up Windows NT now, press ENTER.


c.. To repair a damaged Windows NT version 4.0 installation, press R.


d.. To quit Setup without installing Windows NT, press F3.


2.. Press ENTER to start the parallel installation process. The next dialog box lists the detected mass storage devices. If the list is correct, press ENTER to continue.


3.. After the End User License Agreement dialog box is displayed, the hardware that is detected is displayed. If the list is correct, press ENTER to continue.

NOTE: In most cases, you do not need to specify additional drives for pointing devices or other input devices for this process. Only minimal device support is needed for a parallel installation of Windows NT 4.0.


4.. If the operating system you are installing is less than or equal to the operating system that is currently installed, an upgrade dialog box is displayed. For example, if Windows NT Server is installed and this parallel installation is Windows NT Workstation, an upgrade dialog box is not displayed and Setup continues to the hardware configuration dialog box. The upgrade dialog box looks like the following example:


Setup has found Windows NT on your hard disk in the directory shown below.

C:\WINNT "Windows NT Server Version 4.00"

Setup recommends upgrading this Windows NT installation to Microsoft Windows NT version 4.0. Upgrading will preserve user account and security information, user preferences, and other configuration information.


a.. To upgrade Windows NT in the directory shown above, press ENTER.


b.. To cancel upgrade and install a fresh copy of Windows NT, press N.


5.. At this point, press N for a new installation of Windows NT, which is the parallel installation (note that the installation and drive letter may be different than what is shown in the previous example).


6.. The next dialog box lists the hardware that is detected. If the list is correct, press ENTER to continue. In most situations, you do not need to specify additional drives for pointing devices or other input devices for this process. You only need minimal device support for a parallel installation of Windows NT 4.0.


7.. After the hardware configuration dialog box is displayed, the partition and drive dialog box is displayed. Select a drive or partition that has at least 100 MB free, and is either the FAT16 or NTFS file system.

NOTE: If the partitions shown here are listed as "damaged or unformatted" and the drive is an IDE drive that is larger than 7.8 GB, stop the installation and refer to the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article:


Q197667 Installing Windows NT on a Large IDE Hard Disk
8.. When you perform a parallel installation of Windows NT, you do not need to make any changes to the file system. You should not delete or reformat a partition at this point. If the disks and partitions are still listed as unknown or if there are any other error messages, stop the installation and troubleshoot the problem. Any changes made at this point in the Windows NT installation could lead to a loss of data.


9.. If there are drives listed that are FAT or NTFS, select one of the drives that has at least 100 MB of free disk space, and then press ENTER.


10.. The next dialog box displays the partition you selected and gives you several choices on how to proceed with the installation:


Select the type of file system you want on this partition from the list below. Use the UP and DOWN ARROW keys to move the highlight to the selection you want. Then press ENTER.

If you want to select a different partition for Windows NT, press ESC.

Format the partition using the FAT file system
Format the partition using the NTFS file system
Convert the partition to NTFS
Leave the current file system intact (no changes)

11.. For a parallel installation, choose the Leave the current file system intact (no changes) option, and then press ENTER.


12.. The next dialog box is where the installation location is specified. Change the default folder (Winnt) to a new name (for example, Winnt40) to ensure that this is a unique installation. To make the change, simply type the additional characters at the end of the Winnt, and then press ENTER.


13.. Setup then checks the disk for damage. If there is no disk damage, press ENTER. If there is disk damage, you should not perform a parallel installation.


14.. After the disk check is performed, Setup starts copying files. At the end of the file copying process, Setup indicates that this portion of Setup is successfully completed. Remove any CDs and disks from the computer, and then press ENTER to restart the computer.


15.. After the computer restarts, Setup starts and the Welcome dialog box is displayed (this dialog box lists the remaining three phases of Setup, which are Gathering Information, Networking, and Finishing Setup). If you are installing Windows NT Workstation, the Setup Options dialog box is also displayed. This dialog box lists the following four installation options:


a.. Typical


b.. Portable


c.. Compact


d.. Custom


16.. The Name and Organization dialog box is displayed next. This information does not have to exactly match the original installation; the information you type here is for your reference only.


17.. The Registration dialog box is displayed next. After you type your CD Key, click Next to continue.


18.. This step is for Windows NT Server only: The Licensing Modes dialog box is displayed, which allows you to choose the number of licenses and the mode of licensing. Type the appropriate information, and then click Next to continue.


19.. The Computer Name dialog box is then displayed. Typically, the parallel installation of Windows NT should not be the same name as the original installation of Windows NT. Because this installation of Windows NT is independent of the original installation, choose a name that is not in use on the network, and then click Next to continue.


20.. This step is for Windows NT Server only: If you are installing Windows NT Server, the next dialog box allows you to pick a server type. The best choice for a temporary, parallel installation is a the Stand-Alone Server option. If you choose the Primary Domain Controller option, a new domain is created. If you choose the Backup Domain Controller option, a primary domain controller (PDC) must be contacted to verify security and join this computer to the domain.


21.. The next dialog box prompts you to assign a password to the Administrator account of the parallel installation. Microsoft recommends that you assign a complex password.


22.. The next dialog box lets you create an Emergency Repair Disk (ERD). In most cases, there is no need for an ERD during a parallel installation. Choose the Emergency Repair Disk option, and then click Next to continue.


23.. This step is for Windows NT Workstation only: If you are installing Windows NT Workstation, the next dialog box gives you the following options:


a.. Install the most common components (recommended)


b.. Show me the list of components so I can choose


24.. The next dialog box allows you to select optional components that you want installed on the parallel installation. None of the optional components is necessary and can be deselected. One thing to note is that if you add an item to the operating system from the original Windows NT media after applying a service pack, the service pack that was previously applied should be reapplied. This rule should be applied even if you are installing printer drivers or accessories from Control Panel (click Add/Remove Components, and then click Windows NT Setup). After the components are configured, click Next to continue.


25.. The Windows NT Networking dialog box is then displayed. After you click Next, Setup initializes networking and prompts you to choose whether or not you want this computer to participate on a network. If there are network resources that may be required after the parallel installation (for example, a service pack), choose the This computer will participate on a network option. Otherwise, choose the Do not connect this computer to a network at this time option, and then click Next to continue.


26.. This step is for Windows NT Server only: The next dialog box gives you the option to install Microsoft Internet Information Server. In most cases, this component is not needed during a parallel installation and can be deselected.


27.. If the computer is configured to participate on the network, the next dialog box is for configuring network adapters. If Setup recognizes the network adapter, you can click Start Search to add the adapter to the list of installed adapters. Otherwise, you can select or specify an adapter by clicking Select from list. After the network adapters are installed, click Next to continue.


28.. The next dialog box is for the configuration of networking protocols. Select the protocols in use on your network and then click Next to continue. The Network Services dialog box is displayed next, and the services that are listed and selected by default are typically sufficient for a parallel installation.


29.. Clicking Next twice starts the networking. You are prompted for additional information if needed, and to list the binding orders of the networking components. In addition, you can choose the grouping configuration (either Workgroup or Domain). A parallel installation does not need to participate in a domain. After you choose the grouping information, click Next to continue, and then click Finish.


30.. The next dialog box lets you select a time zone. Select the appropriate time zone, and then click Next to continue.


31.. The next dialog box allows you to configure the display. For a parallel installation, the default or detected adapter and resolution should be sufficient. If necessary, test the resolution, and then click OK.


32.. At this point, some additional files are copied and the configuration is saved. Remove the CD-ROM. You can now restart the computer and boot into the parallel installation.



Additional query words:

Keywords : kbenv kbsetup
Issue type : kbinfo
Technology : kbWinNTsearch kbWinNTWsearch kbWinNTW400 kbWinNTW400search kbWinNT400xsearch kbWinNTSsearch kbWinNTSEntSearch kbWinNTSEnt400 kbWinNTS400xsearch kbWinNTS400


Last Reviewed: October 27, 2000
© 2001 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Terms of Use.




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Send feedback to MSDN.Look here for MSDN Online resources.
--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://webdiary.smh.com.au/archives/_comment/001075.htm...
=================================================

It's clear the intent is for companies to buy computers and install the same OS as the rest of the company.

But what about the home user (of XP Pro). How would they go about it - with no CD and no key. How can a individual actually use this right (officially).

[I'll forgo harrassing you about the absense of ME]
-
---------------------------------------------------------------
David Candy
http://www.mvps.org/serenitymacros
http://www.winsite.com/bin/Info?500000002364 or http://www.simtel.com/pub/pd/18669.html
--
http://www.newstatesman.co.uk and http://www.newint.org
---------------------------------------------------------------
"Mike Brannigan [MS]" <mikebran@online.microsoft.com> wrote in message news:eCFCLoWPCHA.2680@tkmsftngp13...
> Antonio,
>
> The quote in my other post comes from a document called:-
>
> Downgrade Rights Chart
> at
> http://www.microsoft.com/LICENSING/resources/volbrief.a...
> or directly from
> http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/downloads/downgrade_...
>
>
> We all learn something every day !!
>
> --
> Regards,
>
> Mike
> --
> Mike Brannigan [MS]
>
> This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
> rights
>
> Please note I cannot respond to e-mailed questions.
> Please use these newsgroups
>
> "Antonio Amengual" <amengualserra@ono.com> wrote in message
> news:o Q4HDhWPCHA.2404@tkmsftngp11...
> well i see right answer in your new post
> i hav'nt see that in the agreement, people from client & partner support
> at MS Spain told me about the "downgradable" capabilities of XP
> apologise if i put my foot in it
>
>
> --
>
> Associate Expert Zone
> Expert Zone - http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
>
>
>
> XP Pro-2600-limpia+SP1
>
> por favor
> respuestas al grupo; asi nos beneficiamos todos
> no se responde personalmente
>
> saludos
>
> Antonio
> ms mvp dts
>
> "Mike Brannigan [MS]" <mikebran@online.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:#iHbcJWPCHA.2484@tkmsftngp13...
> > According to which part of the license agreement ??
> >
> > --
> > Regards,
> >
> > Mike
> > --
> > Mike Brannigan [MS]
> >
> > This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
> > rights
> >
> > Please note I cannot respond to e-mailed questions.
> > Please use these newsgroups
> >
> > "Antonio Amengual" <amengualserra@ono.com> wrote in message
> > news:o viJs$VPCHA.2520@tkmsftngp13...
> > Sorry, XP licence legitimates a PC with w2000 pro or NT Wkst installed
> >
> >
> > --
> >
> > Associate Expert Zone
> > Expert Zone - http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
> >
> >
> >
> > XP Pro-2600-limpia+SP1
> >
> > por favor
> > respuestas al grupo; asi nos beneficiamos todos
> > no se responde personalmente
> >
> > saludos
> >
> > Antonio
> > ms mvp dts
> >
> > "Mike Brannigan [MS]" <mikebran@online.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> > news:o evv6sVPCHA.2280@tkmsftngp13...
> > > "scott" <screagan@forwardair.com> wrote in message
> > > news:12fa01c23d5a$41c69700$35ef2ecf@TKMSFTNGXA11...
> > > > If a machine comes with winxp is it legal to put win2k on
> > > > it instead of winxp..
> > >
> > > Yes - as long as you have bought and paid for a Windows 2000
> license.
> > >
> > > Windows XP does not have any downgrade options unless you are a very
> > > large corporate customer and get a specific contract with the OEM.
> > > You may not just use a friends Windows 2000 CD to install. Your
> > license
> > > is for Windows XP only.
> > >
> > > You should also be aware that if this was an OEM supplied PC then to
> > > replace the OS renders you out of support with the OEM.
> > >
> > > --
> > > Regards,
> > >
> > > Mike
> > > --
> > > Mike Brannigan [MS]
> > >
> > > This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
> > > rights
> > >
> > > Please note I cannot respond to e-mailed questions.
> > > Please use these newsgroups
> > >
> > > "scott" <screagan@forwardair.com> wrote in message
> > > news:12fa01c23d5a$41c69700$35ef2ecf@TKMSFTNGXA11...
> > > > If a machine comes with winxp is it legal to put win2k on
> > > > it instead of winxp..
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>


"Don Taylor" <dont@agora.rdrop.com> wrote in message news:Ko2dnd7864lZvHjfRVn-rw@scnresearch.com...
> "David Candy" <.> writes:
>>AFAIK it is against the EULA and it is reccommended by MS. Try pinning =
> ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>>them down on it.
>
> AFAYK can you provide a pointer to the documents that I've once seen
> where this was described by MS? Material written by them would be so
> much more helpful than opinions by everybody else.
>
> Thank you
>
>>"Don Taylor" <dont@agora.rdrop.com> wrote in message =
>>news:69adneI2evt1BnnfRVn-jg@scnresearch.com...
>>> "Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> writes:
>>>>"Don Taylor" wrote:
>>>>> <usasma@discussions.microsoft.com> writes:
>>>>>>Installing a second copy would require another license and I don't
>>>>>>know if there would be any problems with the activation of it.
>>>>>=20
>>>>> Nope, wrong. Install your XP CD in one partition, activate as =
>>usual.
>>>>> Stick the same CD right back in, install XP in the other partition,
>>>>> activate as usual, activation goes right through without any =
>>complaint.
>>>>>=20
>>>>> (This is because ALL the critical items that are checked to confirm
>>>>> that they are the same and this is legal and that you haven't tried
>>>>> to install one copy on multiple different machines are EXACTLY THE =
>>SAME,
>>>>> because it is on the SAME machine)
>>>=20
>>>> I am of the opinion that two installations of WinXP in the
>>>> same machine under one license is legal, but I don't think
>>>> it has ever been tested in court. As far as Microsoft is
>>>> concerned, though, it is a violation of their EULA and therefore
>>>> by their own self-serving definition "illegal".
>>>=20
>>> People have screamed their opposing positions on this question
>>> at each other over and over and over and over, in this group
>>> and in others, for a long time. Google can confirm this if you
>>> can think of appropriate keywords to use to search and find the
>>> arguments. It is my opinion that you aren't going to make
>>> anybody happy with this subject.
Anonymous
July 26, 2005 7:56:54 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"David Candy" <.> writes:
>Search on parallel instalation (I would but I can't spell it - spell =

Thank you, I'll keep hunting and try to find this. I do remember that
this was distributed about the time that XP was being released and I
am almost positive that it specifically described this for XP.

Thanks again

>checking came to the rescue.). Also re downgrade rights with XP Pro. =
>Plus there was a thread that Mike Brannigan and myself were in re =
>downgrade rights and use of CD (thus breaching the explicit EULA) which =
>is somewhat related in concept but it has disappeared from google. All I =
>can find is posts by me refering to it - but I forget my records, hang =
>on while I search. At the end of KB but still can't find it in google. =
>It doesn't have MB reply of course in my sent posts.
> How and Why to Perform a Parallel Installation of Windows NT 4.0=20

>Q259003


>-------------------------------------------------------------------------=
>-------
>The information in this article applies to:

> a.. Microsoft Windows NT Workstation version 4.0=20
> b.. Microsoft Windows NT Server version 4.0=20
> c.. Microsoft Windows NT Server, Enterprise Edition version 4.0

>-------------------------------------------------------------------------=
>-------


>SUMMARY
>This article describes steps and recommendations for performing a =
>parallel installation of Windows NT 4.0. A parallel installation of the =
>operating system is an installation to the same drive and volume as an =
>existing installation of Windows NT, with the difference being the name =
>of the operating system folder.=20

>You can perform a parallel installation when you are using an =
>installation of Windows NT 4.0 for testing or debugging, or when the =
>operating system cannot be started. In the case of troubleshooting an =
>installation that cannot be started, if the file system is FAT, it is =
>possible to boot from an MS-DOS boot disk and gain access to the files. =
>However, if the file system is NTFS, you cannot gain access to the file =
>system using a boot disk.=20

>You should perform the procedure listed in this article as a last =
>resort. You should examine and address any problems you encounter during =
>this process. Changes made to the file system during a parallel =
>installation of Windows NT 4.0 could result in permanent loss of data.=20



>MORE INFORMATION
>The procedure described in this article applies equally to Windows NT =
>Workstation and Windows NT Server, except where noted.=20

>NOTE: During the installation process, if at any time a message is =
>displayed stating that files being copied are older than what is on the =
>system, choose the option to not overwrite the files.=20

>The minimum disk requirement for installing Windows NT Server is 125 MB. =
>If the system is very low on disk space (for example, less than 100 MB), =
>the installation is unsuccessful. However, you can proceed with Setup =
>and it calculates how much disk space is needed for the installation, =
>based on your selections. If there is not enough space for a parallel =
>installation, you can add another drive to the computer temporarily, and =
>then perform the parallel installation on the temporary drive.=20

>Performing a Parallel Installation
>To perform a parallel installation of Windows NT, use the following =
>steps:=20
> 1.. Start the computer either from the Windows NT 4.0 disks or the =
>Windows NT 4.0 CD-ROM.=20

> NOTE: If you need to install an additional SCSI driver, refer to the =
>following Microsoft Knowledge Base article for the steps on installing =
>an additional driver during Setup:=20
> Q158568 Installing Retired or Third-Party SCSI Drivers During Setup=20
> Otherwise, Windows NT Setup loads drivers and continues until the =
>following message is displayed:


> Welcome to Setup.

> The Setup program for the Microsoft(R) Windows NT(TM) operating =
>system version 4.0 prepares Windows NT to run on your computer.


> a.. To learn more about Windows NT Setup before continuing, press =
>F1.


> b.. To set up Windows NT now, press ENTER.


> c.. To repair a damaged Windows NT version 4.0 installation, press =
>R.


> d.. To quit Setup without installing Windows NT, press F3.


> 2.. Press ENTER to start the parallel installation process. The next =
>dialog box lists the detected mass storage devices. If the list is =
>correct, press ENTER to continue.


> 3.. After the End User License Agreement dialog box is displayed, the =
>hardware that is detected is displayed. If the list is correct, press =
>ENTER to continue.=20

> NOTE: In most cases, you do not need to specify additional drives for =
>pointing devices or other input devices for this process. Only minimal =
>device support is needed for a parallel installation of Windows NT 4.0.


> 4.. If the operating system you are installing is less than or equal =
>to the operating system that is currently installed, an upgrade dialog =
>box is displayed. For example, if Windows NT Server is installed and =
>this parallel installation is Windows NT Workstation, an upgrade dialog =
>box is not displayed and Setup continues to the hardware configuration =
>dialog box. The upgrade dialog box looks like the following example:


> Setup has found Windows NT on your hard disk in the directory shown =
>below.

> C:\WINNT "Windows NT Server Version 4.00"

> Setup recommends upgrading this Windows NT installation to Microsoft =
>Windows NT version 4.0. Upgrading will preserve user account and =
>security information, user preferences, and other configuration =
>information.


> a.. To upgrade Windows NT in the directory shown above, press =
>ENTER.


> b.. To cancel upgrade and install a fresh copy of Windows NT, =
>press N.


> 5.. At this point, press N for a new installation of Windows NT, which =
>is the parallel installation (note that the installation and drive =
>letter may be different than what is shown in the previous example).


> 6.. The next dialog box lists the hardware that is detected. If the =
>list is correct, press ENTER to continue. In most situations, you do not =
>need to specify additional drives for pointing devices or other input =
>devices for this process. You only need minimal device support for a =
>parallel installation of Windows NT 4.0.


> 7.. After the hardware configuration dialog box is displayed, the =
>partition and drive dialog box is displayed. Select a drive or partition =
>that has at least 100 MB free, and is either the FAT16 or NTFS file =
>system.=20

> NOTE: If the partitions shown here are listed as "damaged or =
>unformatted" and the drive is an IDE drive that is larger than 7.8 GB, =
>stop the installation and refer to the following Microsoft Knowledge =
>Base article:


> Q197667 Installing Windows NT on a Large IDE Hard Disk=20
> 8.. When you perform a parallel installation of Windows NT, you do not =
>need to make any changes to the file system. You should not delete or =
>reformat a partition at this point. If the disks and partitions are =
>still listed as unknown or if there are any other error messages, stop =
>the installation and troubleshoot the problem. Any changes made at this =
>point in the Windows NT installation could lead to a loss of data.


> 9.. If there are drives listed that are FAT or NTFS, select one of the =
>drives that has at least 100 MB of free disk space, and then press =
>ENTER.


> 10.. The next dialog box displays the partition you selected and gives =
>you several choices on how to proceed with the installation:


> Select the type of file system you want on this partition from the =
>list below. Use the UP and DOWN ARROW keys to move the highlight to the =
>selection you want. Then press ENTER.

> If you want to select a different partition for Windows NT, press =
>ESC.

> Format the partition using the FAT file system
> Format the partition using the NTFS file system
> Convert the partition to NTFS
> Leave the current file system intact (no changes)

> 11.. For a parallel installation, choose the Leave the current file =
>system intact (no changes) option, and then press ENTER.


> 12.. The next dialog box is where the installation location is =
>specified. Change the default folder (Winnt) to a new name (for example, =
>Winnt40) to ensure that this is a unique installation. To make the =
>change, simply type the additional characters at the end of the Winnt, =
>and then press ENTER.


> 13.. Setup then checks the disk for damage. If there is no disk =
>damage, press ENTER. If there is disk damage, you should not perform a =
>parallel installation.


> 14.. After the disk check is performed, Setup starts copying files. At =
>the end of the file copying process, Setup indicates that this portion =
>of Setup is successfully completed. Remove any CDs and disks from the =
>computer, and then press ENTER to restart the computer.


> 15.. After the computer restarts, Setup starts and the Welcome dialog =
>box is displayed (this dialog box lists the remaining three phases of =
>Setup, which are Gathering Information, Networking, and Finishing =
>Setup). If you are installing Windows NT Workstation, the Setup Options =
>dialog box is also displayed. This dialog box lists the following four =
>installation options:


> a.. Typical


> b.. Portable


> c.. Compact


> d.. Custom


> 16.. The Name and Organization dialog box is displayed next. This =
>information does not have to exactly match the original installation; =
>the information you type here is for your reference only.


> 17.. The Registration dialog box is displayed next. After you type =
>your CD Key, click Next to continue.


> 18.. This step is for Windows NT Server only: The Licensing Modes =
>dialog box is displayed, which allows you to choose the number of =
>licenses and the mode of licensing. Type the appropriate information, =
>and then click Next to continue.


> 19.. The Computer Name dialog box is then displayed. Typically, the =
>parallel installation of Windows NT should not be the same name as the =
>original installation of Windows NT. Because this installation of =
>Windows NT is independent of the original installation, choose a name =
>that is not in use on the network, and then click Next to continue.


> 20.. This step is for Windows NT Server only: If you are installing =
>Windows NT Server, the next dialog box allows you to pick a server type. =
>The best choice for a temporary, parallel installation is a the =
>Stand-Alone Server option. If you choose the Primary Domain Controller =
>option, a new domain is created. If you choose the Backup Domain =
>Controller option, a primary domain controller (PDC) must be contacted =
>to verify security and join this computer to the domain.


> 21.. The next dialog box prompts you to assign a password to the =
>Administrator account of the parallel installation. Microsoft recommends =
>that you assign a complex password.


> 22.. The next dialog box lets you create an Emergency Repair Disk =
>(ERD). In most cases, there is no need for an ERD during a parallel =
>installation. Choose the Emergency Repair Disk option, and then click =
>Next to continue.


> 23.. This step is for Windows NT Workstation only: If you are =
>installing Windows NT Workstation, the next dialog box gives you the =
>following options:


> a.. Install the most common components (recommended)


> b.. Show me the list of components so I can choose


> 24.. The next dialog box allows you to select optional components that =
>you want installed on the parallel installation. None of the optional =
>components is necessary and can be deselected. One thing to note is that =
>if you add an item to the operating system from the original Windows NT =
>media after applying a service pack, the service pack that was =
>previously applied should be reapplied. This rule should be applied even =
>if you are installing printer drivers or accessories from Control Panel =
>(click Add/Remove Components, and then click Windows NT Setup). After =
>the components are configured, click Next to continue.


> 25.. The Windows NT Networking dialog box is then displayed. After you =
>click Next, Setup initializes networking and prompts you to choose =
>whether or not you want this computer to participate on a network. If =
>there are network resources that may be required after the parallel =
>installation (for example, a service pack), choose the This computer =
>will participate on a network option. Otherwise, choose the Do not =
>connect this computer to a network at this time option, and then click =
>Next to continue.


> 26.. This step is for Windows NT Server only: The next dialog box =
>gives you the option to install Microsoft Internet Information Server. =
>In most cases, this component is not needed during a parallel =
>installation and can be deselected.


> 27.. If the computer is configured to participate on the network, the =
>next dialog box is for configuring network adapters. If Setup recognizes =
>the network adapter, you can click Start Search to add the adapter to =
>the list of installed adapters. Otherwise, you can select or specify an =
>adapter by clicking Select from list. After the network adapters are =
>installed, click Next to continue.


> 28.. The next dialog box is for the configuration of networking =
>protocols. Select the protocols in use on your network and then click =
>Next to continue. The Network Services dialog box is displayed next, and =
>the services that are listed and selected by default are typically =
>sufficient for a parallel installation.


> 29.. Clicking Next twice starts the networking. You are prompted for =
>additional information if needed, and to list the binding orders of the =
>networking components. In addition, you can choose the grouping =
>configuration (either Workgroup or Domain). A parallel installation does =
>not need to participate in a domain. After you choose the grouping =
>information, click Next to continue, and then click Finish.


> 30.. The next dialog box lets you select a time zone. Select the =
>appropriate time zone, and then click Next to continue.


> 31.. The next dialog box allows you to configure the display. For a =
>parallel installation, the default or detected adapter and resolution =
>should be sufficient. If necessary, test the resolution, and then click =
>OK.


> 32.. At this point, some additional files are copied and the =
>configuration is saved. Remove the CD-ROM. You can now restart the =
>computer and boot into the parallel installation.



>Additional query words:=20

>Keywords : kbenv kbsetup=20
>Issue type : kbinfo=20
>Technology : kbWinNTsearch kbWinNTWsearch kbWinNTW400 kbWinNTW400search =
>kbWinNT400xsearch kbWinNTSsearch kbWinNTSEntSearch kbWinNTSEnt400 =
>kbWinNTS400xsearch kbWinNTS400=20


> Last Reviewed: October 27, 2000
> =A9 2001 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Terms of Use.
> =20



>-------------------------------------------------------------------------=
>-------
>Send feedback to MSDN.Look here for MSDN Online resources.=20
>--=20
>-------------------------------------------------------------------------=
>-------------------------
>http://webdiary.smh.com.au/archives/_comment/001075.htm...
>=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
>=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D

>It's clear the intent is for companies to buy computers and install the =
>same OS as the rest of the company.

>But what about the home user (of XP Pro). How would they go about it - =
>with no CD and no key. How can a individual actually use this right =
>(officially).

>[I'll forgo harrassing you about the absense of ME]
>-=20
>---------------------------------------------------------------
>David Candy
>http://www.mvps.org/serenitymacros
>http://www.winsite.com/bin/Info?500000002364 or =
>http://www.simtel.com/pub/pd/18669.html
>--
>http://www.newstatesman.co.uk and http://www.newint.org
>---------------------------------------------------------------
>"Mike Brannigan [MS]" <mikebran@online.microsoft.com> wrote in message =
>news:eCFCLoWPCHA.2680@tkmsftngp13...
>> Antonio,
>>=20
>> The quote in my other post comes from a document called:-
>>=20
>> Downgrade Rights Chart
>> at
>> http://www.microsoft.com/LICENSING/resources/volbrief.a...
>> or directly from
>> http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/downloads/downgrade_...
>>=20
>>=20
>> We all learn something every day !!
>>=20
>> --
>> Regards,
>>=20
>> Mike
>> --
>> Mike Brannigan [MS]
>>=20
>> This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
>> rights
>>=20
>> Please note I cannot respond to e-mailed questions.
>> Please use these newsgroups
>>=20
>> "Antonio Amengual" <amengualserra@ono.com> wrote in message
>> news:o Q4HDhWPCHA.2404@tkmsftngp11...
>> well i see right answer in your new post
>> i hav'nt see that in the agreement, people from client & partner =
>support
>> at MS Spain told me about the "downgradable" capabilities of XP
>> apologise if i put my foot in it
>>=20
>>=20
>> --
>>=20
>> Associate Expert Zone
>> Expert Zone - http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
>>=20
>>=20
>>=20
>> XP Pro-2600-limpia+SP1
>>=20
>> por favor
>> respuestas al grupo; asi nos beneficiamos todos
>> no se responde personalmente
>>=20
>> saludos
>>=20
>> Antonio
>> ms mvp dts
>>=20
>> "Mike Brannigan [MS]" <mikebran@online.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>> news:#iHbcJWPCHA.2484@tkmsftngp13...
>> > According to which part of the license agreement ??
>> >
>> > --
>> > Regards,
>> >
>> > Mike
>> > --
>> > Mike Brannigan [MS]
>> >
>> > This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
>> > rights
>> >
>> > Please note I cannot respond to e-mailed questions.
>> > Please use these newsgroups
>> >
>> > "Antonio Amengual" <amengualserra@ono.com> wrote in message
>> > news:o viJs$VPCHA.2520@tkmsftngp13...
>> > Sorry, XP licence legitimates a PC with w2000 pro or NT Wkst =
>installed
>> >
>> >
>> > --
>> >
>> > Associate Expert Zone
>> > Expert Zone - http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > XP Pro-2600-limpia+SP1
>> >
>> > por favor
>> > respuestas al grupo; asi nos beneficiamos todos
>> > no se responde personalmente
>> >
>> > saludos
>> >
>> > Antonio
>> > ms mvp dts
>> >
>> > "Mike Brannigan [MS]" <mikebran@online.microsoft.com> wrote in =
>message
>> > news:o evv6sVPCHA.2280@tkmsftngp13...
>> > > "scott" <screagan@forwardair.com> wrote in message
>> > > news:12fa01c23d5a$41c69700$35ef2ecf@TKMSFTNGXA11...
>> > > > If a machine comes with winxp is it legal to put win2k on
>> > > > it instead of winxp..
>> > >
>> > > Yes - as long as you have bought and paid for a Windows 2000
>> license.
>> > >
>> > > Windows XP does not have any downgrade options unless you are a =
>very
>> > > large corporate customer and get a specific contract with the OEM.
>> > > You may not just use a friends Windows 2000 CD to install. Your
>> > license
>> > > is for Windows XP only.
>> > >
>> > > You should also be aware that if this was an OEM supplied PC then =
>to
>> > > replace the OS renders you out of support with the OEM.
>> > >
>> > > --
>> > > Regards,
>> > >
>> > > Mike
>> > > --
>> > > Mike Brannigan [MS]
>> > >
>> > > This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers =
>no
>> > > rights
>> > >
>> > > Please note I cannot respond to e-mailed questions.
>> > > Please use these newsgroups
>> > >
>> > > "scott" <screagan@forwardair.com> wrote in message
>> > > news:12fa01c23d5a$41c69700$35ef2ecf@TKMSFTNGXA11...
>> > > > If a machine comes with winxp is it legal to put win2k on
>> > > > it instead of winxp..
>> > >
>> > >
>> >
>> >
>>=20
>>=20


>"Don Taylor" <dont@agora.rdrop.com> wrote in message =
>news:Ko2dnd7864lZvHjfRVn-rw@scnresearch.com...
>> "David Candy" <.> writes:
>>>AFAIK it is against the EULA and it is reccommended by MS. Try pinning =
>=3D
>> ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>>>them down on it.
>>=20
>> AFAYK can you provide a pointer to the documents that I've once seen
>> where this was described by MS? Material written by them would be so
>> much more helpful than opinions by everybody else.
>>=20
>> Thank you
>>=20
>>>"Don Taylor" <dont@agora.rdrop.com> wrote in message =3D
>>>news:69adneI2evt1BnnfRVn-jg@scnresearch.com...
>>>> "Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> writes:
>>>>>"Don Taylor" wrote:
>>>>>> <usasma@discussions.microsoft.com> writes:
>>>>>>>Installing a second copy would require another license and I don't
>>>>>>>know if there would be any problems with the activation of it.
>>>>>>=3D20
>>>>>> Nope, wrong. Install your XP CD in one partition, activate as =3D
>>>usual.
>>>>>> Stick the same CD right back in, install XP in the other =
>partition,
>>>>>> activate as usual, activation goes right through without any =3D
>>>complaint.
>>>>>>=3D20
>>>>>> (This is because ALL the critical items that are checked to =
>confirm
>>>>>> that they are the same and this is legal and that you haven't =
>tried
>>>>>> to install one copy on multiple different machines are EXACTLY THE =
>=3D
>>>SAME,
>>>>>> because it is on the SAME machine)
>>>>=3D20
>>>>> I am of the opinion that two installations of WinXP in the
>>>>> same machine under one license is legal, but I don't think
>>>>> it has ever been tested in court. As far as Microsoft is
>>>>> concerned, though, it is a violation of their EULA and therefore
>>>>> by their own self-serving definition "illegal".
>>>>=3D20
>>>> People have screamed their opposing positions on this question
>>>> at each other over and over and over and over, in this group
>>>> and in others, for a long time. Google can confirm this if you
>>>> can think of appropriate keywords to use to search and find the
>>>> arguments. It is my opinion that you aren't going to make
>>>> anybody happy with this subject.
Anonymous
July 26, 2005 3:59:07 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

References for
Windows XP
How to troubleshoot "Stop 0x0000007B" errors in Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;324103

Windows 2000 and 2003
How to perform a parallel installation of Windows 2000 or Windows Server
2003
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;266465

Windows NT4
How and Why to Perform a Parallel Installation of Windows NT 4.0
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;259003


Don Taylor wrote:

> "David Candy" <.> writes:
>
>>Search on parallel instalation (I would but I can't spell it - spell =
>
>
> Thank you, I'll keep hunting and try to find this. I do remember that
> this was distributed about the time that XP was being released and I
> am almost positive that it specifically described this for XP.
>
> Thanks again
>
>
>>checking came to the rescue.). Also re downgrade rights with XP Pro. =
>>Plus there was a thread that Mike Brannigan and myself were in re =
>>downgrade rights and use of CD (thus breaching the explicit EULA) which =
>>is somewhat related in concept but it has disappeared from google. All I =
>>can find is posts by me refering to it - but I forget my records, hang =
>>on while I search. At the end of KB but still can't find it in google. =
>>It doesn't have MB reply of course in my sent posts.
>> How and Why to Perform a Parallel Installation of Windows NT 4.0=20
>
>
>>Q259003
>
>
>
>>-------------------------------------------------------------------------=
>>-------
>>The information in this article applies to:
>
>
>> a.. Microsoft Windows NT Workstation version 4.0=20
>> b.. Microsoft Windows NT Server version 4.0=20
>> c.. Microsoft Windows NT Server, Enterprise Edition version 4.0
>
>
>>-------------------------------------------------------------------------=
>>-------
>
>
>
>>SUMMARY
>>This article describes steps and recommendations for performing a =
>>parallel installation of Windows NT 4.0. A parallel installation of the =
>>operating system is an installation to the same drive and volume as an =
>>existing installation of Windows NT, with the difference being the name =
>>of the operating system folder.=20
>
>
>>You can perform a parallel installation when you are using an =
>>installation of Windows NT 4.0 for testing or debugging, or when the =
>>operating system cannot be started. In the case of troubleshooting an =
>>installation that cannot be started, if the file system is FAT, it is =
>>possible to boot from an MS-DOS boot disk and gain access to the files. =
>>However, if the file system is NTFS, you cannot gain access to the file =
>>system using a boot disk.=20
>
>
>>You should perform the procedure listed in this article as a last =
>>resort. You should examine and address any problems you encounter during =
>>this process. Changes made to the file system during a parallel =
>>installation of Windows NT 4.0 could result in permanent loss of data.=20
>
>
>
>
>>MORE INFORMATION
>>The procedure described in this article applies equally to Windows NT =
>>Workstation and Windows NT Server, except where noted.=20
>
>
>>NOTE: During the installation process, if at any time a message is =
>>displayed stating that files being copied are older than what is on the =
>>system, choose the option to not overwrite the files.=20
>
>
>>The minimum disk requirement for installing Windows NT Server is 125 MB. =
>>If the system is very low on disk space (for example, less than 100 MB), =
>>the installation is unsuccessful. However, you can proceed with Setup =
>>and it calculates how much disk space is needed for the installation, =
>>based on your selections. If there is not enough space for a parallel =
>>installation, you can add another drive to the computer temporarily, and =
>>then perform the parallel installation on the temporary drive.=20
>
>
>>Performing a Parallel Installation
>>To perform a parallel installation of Windows NT, use the following =
>>steps:=20
>> 1.. Start the computer either from the Windows NT 4.0 disks or the =
>>Windows NT 4.0 CD-ROM.=20
>
>
>> NOTE: If you need to install an additional SCSI driver, refer to the =
>>following Microsoft Knowledge Base article for the steps on installing =
>>an additional driver during Setup:=20
>> Q158568 Installing Retired or Third-Party SCSI Drivers During Setup=20
>> Otherwise, Windows NT Setup loads drivers and continues until the =
>>following message is displayed:
>
>
>
>> Welcome to Setup.
>
>
>> The Setup program for the Microsoft(R) Windows NT(TM) operating =
>>system version 4.0 prepares Windows NT to run on your computer.
>
>
>
>> a.. To learn more about Windows NT Setup before continuing, press =
>>F1.
>
>
>
>> b.. To set up Windows NT now, press ENTER.
>
>
>
>> c.. To repair a damaged Windows NT version 4.0 installation, press =
>>R.
>
>
>
>> d.. To quit Setup without installing Windows NT, press F3.
>
>
>
>> 2.. Press ENTER to start the parallel installation process. The next =
>>dialog box lists the detected mass storage devices. If the list is =
>>correct, press ENTER to continue.
>
>
>
>> 3.. After the End User License Agreement dialog box is displayed, the =
>>hardware that is detected is displayed. If the list is correct, press =
>>ENTER to continue.=20
>
>
>> NOTE: In most cases, you do not need to specify additional drives for =
>>pointing devices or other input devices for this process. Only minimal =
>>device support is needed for a parallel installation of Windows NT 4.0.
>
>
>
>> 4.. If the operating system you are installing is less than or equal =
>>to the operating system that is currently installed, an upgrade dialog =
>>box is displayed. For example, if Windows NT Server is installed and =
>>this parallel installation is Windows NT Workstation, an upgrade dialog =
>>box is not displayed and Setup continues to the hardware configuration =
>>dialog box. The upgrade dialog box looks like the following example:
>
>
>
>> Setup has found Windows NT on your hard disk in the directory shown =
>>below.
>
>
>> C:\WINNT "Windows NT Server Version 4.00"
>
>
>> Setup recommends upgrading this Windows NT installation to Microsoft =
>>Windows NT version 4.0. Upgrading will preserve user account and =
>>security information, user preferences, and other configuration =
>>information.
>
>
>
>> a.. To upgrade Windows NT in the directory shown above, press =
>>ENTER.
>
>
>
>> b.. To cancel upgrade and install a fresh copy of Windows NT, =
>>press N.
>
>
>
>> 5.. At this point, press N for a new installation of Windows NT, which =
>>is the parallel installation (note that the installation and drive =
>>letter may be different than what is shown in the previous example).
>
>
>
>> 6.. The next dialog box lists the hardware that is detected. If the =
>>list is correct, press ENTER to continue. In most situations, you do not =
>>need to specify additional drives for pointing devices or other input =
>>devices for this process. You only need minimal device support for a =
>>parallel installation of Windows NT 4.0.
>
>
>
>> 7.. After the hardware configuration dialog box is displayed, the =
>>partition and drive dialog box is displayed. Select a drive or partition =
>>that has at least 100 MB free, and is either the FAT16 or NTFS file =
>>system.=20
>
>
>> NOTE: If the partitions shown here are listed as "damaged or =
>>unformatted" and the drive is an IDE drive that is larger than 7.8 GB, =
>>stop the installation and refer to the following Microsoft Knowledge =
>>Base article:
>
>
>
>> Q197667 Installing Windows NT on a Large IDE Hard Disk=20
>> 8.. When you perform a parallel installation of Windows NT, you do not =
>>need to make any changes to the file system. You should not delete or =
>>reformat a partition at this point. If the disks and partitions are =
>>still listed as unknown or if there are any other error messages, stop =
>>the installation and troubleshoot the problem. Any changes made at this =
>>point in the Windows NT installation could lead to a loss of data.
>
>
>
>> 9.. If there are drives listed that are FAT or NTFS, select one of the =
>>drives that has at least 100 MB of free disk space, and then press =
>>ENTER.
>
>
>
>> 10.. The next dialog box displays the partition you selected and gives =
>>you several choices on how to proceed with the installation:
>
>
>
>> Select the type of file system you want on this partition from the =
>>list below. Use the UP and DOWN ARROW keys to move the highlight to the =
>>selection you want. Then press ENTER.
>
>
>> If you want to select a different partition for Windows NT, press =
>>ESC.
>
>
>> Format the partition using the FAT file system
>> Format the partition using the NTFS file system
>> Convert the partition to NTFS
>> Leave the current file system intact (no changes)
>
>
>> 11.. For a parallel installation, choose the Leave the current file =
>>system intact (no changes) option, and then press ENTER.
>
>
>
>> 12.. The next dialog box is where the installation location is =
>>specified. Change the default folder (Winnt) to a new name (for example, =
>>Winnt40) to ensure that this is a unique installation. To make the =
>>change, simply type the additional characters at the end of the Winnt, =
>>and then press ENTER.
>
>
>
>> 13.. Setup then checks the disk for damage. If there is no disk =
>>damage, press ENTER. If there is disk damage, you should not perform a =
>>parallel installation.
>
>
>
>> 14.. After the disk check is performed, Setup starts copying files. At =
>>the end of the file copying process, Setup indicates that this portion =
>>of Setup is successfully completed. Remove any CDs and disks from the =
>>computer, and then press ENTER to restart the computer.
>
>
>
>> 15.. After the computer restarts, Setup starts and the Welcome dialog =
>>box is displayed (this dialog box lists the remaining three phases of =
>>Setup, which are Gathering Information, Networking, and Finishing =
>>Setup). If you are installing Windows NT Workstation, the Setup Options =
>>dialog box is also displayed. This dialog box lists the following four =
>>installation options:
>
>
>
>> a.. Typical
>
>
>
>> b.. Portable
>
>
>
>> c.. Compact
>
>
>
>> d.. Custom
>
>
>
>> 16.. The Name and Organization dialog box is displayed next. This =
>>information does not have to exactly match the original installation; =
>>the information you type here is for your reference only.
>
>
>
>> 17.. The Registration dialog box is displayed next. After you type =
>>your CD Key, click Next to continue.
>
>
>
>> 18.. This step is for Windows NT Server only: The Licensing Modes =
>>dialog box is displayed, which allows you to choose the number of =
>>licenses and the mode of licensing. Type the appropriate information, =
>>and then click Next to continue.
>
>
>
>> 19.. The Computer Name dialog box is then displayed. Typically, the =
>>parallel installation of Windows NT should not be the same name as the =
>>original installation of Windows NT. Because this installation of =
>>Windows NT is independent of the original installation, choose a name =
>>that is not in use on the network, and then click Next to continue.
>
>
>
>> 20.. This step is for Windows NT Server only: If you are installing =
>>Windows NT Server, the next dialog box allows you to pick a server type. =
>>The best choice for a temporary, parallel installation is a the =
>>Stand-Alone Server option. If you choose the Primary Domain Controller =
>>option, a new domain is created. If you choose the Backup Domain =
>>Controller option, a primary domain controller (PDC) must be contacted =
>>to verify security and join this computer to the domain.
>
>
>
>> 21.. The next dialog box prompts you to assign a password to the =
>>Administrator account of the parallel installation. Microsoft recommends =
>>that you assign a complex password.
>
>
>
>> 22.. The next dialog box lets you create an Emergency Repair Disk =
>>(ERD). In most cases, there is no need for an ERD during a parallel =
>>installation. Choose the Emergency Repair Disk option, and then click =
>>Next to continue.
>
>
>
>> 23.. This step is for Windows NT Workstation only: If you are =
>>installing Windows NT Workstation, the next dialog box gives you the =
>>following options:
>
>
>
>> a.. Install the most common components (recommended)
>
>
>
>> b.. Show me the list of components so I can choose
>
>
>
>> 24.. The next dialog box allows you to select optional components that =
>>you want installed on the parallel installation. None of the optional =
>>components is necessary and can be deselected. One thing to note is that =
>>if you add an item to the operating system from the original Windows NT =
>>media after applying a service pack, the service pack that was =
>>previously applied should be reapplied. This rule should be applied even =
>>if you are installing printer drivers or accessories from Control Panel =
>>(click Add/Remove Components, and then click Windows NT Setup). After =
>>the components are configured, click Next to continue.
>
>
>
>> 25.. The Windows NT Networking dialog box is then displayed. After you =
>>click Next, Setup initializes networking and prompts you to choose =
>>whether or not you want this computer to participate on a network. If =
>>there are network resources that may be required after the parallel =
>>installation (for example, a service pack), choose the This computer =
>>will participate on a network option. Otherwise, choose the Do not =
>>connect this computer to a network at this time option, and then click =
>>Next to continue.
>
>
>
>> 26.. This step is for Windows NT Server only: The next dialog box =
>>gives you the option to install Microsoft Internet Information Server. =
>>In most cases, this component is not needed during a parallel =
>>installation and can be deselected.
>
>
>
>> 27.. If the computer is configured to participate on the network, the =
>>next dialog box is for configuring network adapters. If Setup recognizes =
>>the network adapter, you can click Start Search to add the adapter to =
>>the list of installed adapters. Otherwise, you can select or specify an =
>>adapter by clicking Select from list. After the network adapters are =
>>installed, click Next to continue.
>
>
>
>> 28.. The next dialog box is for the configuration of networking =
>>protocols. Select the protocols in use on your network and then click =
>>Next to continue. The Network Services dialog box is displayed next, and =
>>the services that are listed and selected by default are typically =
>>sufficient for a parallel installation.
>
>
>
>> 29.. Clicking Next twice starts the networking. You are prompted for =
>>additional information if needed, and to list the binding orders of the =
>>networking components. In addition, you can choose the grouping =
>>configuration (either Workgroup or Domain). A parallel installation does =
>>not need to participate in a domain. After you choose the grouping =
>>information, click Next to continue, and then click Finish.
>
>
>
>> 30.. The next dialog box lets you select a time zone. Select the =
>>appropriate time zone, and then click Next to continue.
>
>
>
>> 31.. The next dialog box allows you to configure the display. For a =
>>parallel installation, the default or detected adapter and resolution =
>>should be sufficient. If necessary, test the resolution, and then click =
>>OK.
>
>
>
>> 32.. At this point, some additional files are copied and the =
>>configuration is saved. Remove the CD-ROM. You can now restart the =
>>computer and boot into the parallel installation.
>
>
>
>
>>Additional query words:=20
>
>
>>Keywords : kbenv kbsetup=20
>>Issue type : kbinfo=20
>>Technology : kbWinNTsearch kbWinNTWsearch kbWinNTW400 kbWinNTW400search =
>>kbWinNT400xsearch kbWinNTSsearch kbWinNTSEntSearch kbWinNTSEnt400 =
>>kbWinNTS400xsearch kbWinNTS400=20
>
>
>
>> Last Reviewed: October 27, 2000
>> =A9 2001 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Terms of Use.
>> =20
>
>
>
>
>>-------------------------------------------------------------------------=
>>-------
>>Send feedback to MSDN.Look here for MSDN Online resources.=20
>>--=20
>>-------------------------------------------------------------------------=
>>-------------------------
>>http://webdiary.smh.com.au/archives/_comment/001075.htm...
>>=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
>>=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D
>
>
>>It's clear the intent is for companies to buy computers and install the =
>>same OS as the rest of the company.
>
>
>>But what about the home user (of XP Pro). How would they go about it - =
>>with no CD and no key. How can a individual actually use this right =
>>(officially).
>
>
>>[I'll forgo harrassing you about the absense of ME]
>>-=20
>>---------------------------------------------------------------
>>David Candy
>>http://www.mvps.org/serenitymacros
>>http://www.winsite.com/bin/Info?500000002364 or =
>>http://www.simtel.com/pub/pd/18669.html
>>--
>>http://www.newstatesman.co.uk and http://www.newint.org
>>---------------------------------------------------------------
>>"Mike Brannigan [MS]" <mikebran@online.microsoft.com> wrote in message =
>>news:eCFCLoWPCHA.2680@tkmsftngp13...
>>
>>>Antonio,
>>>=20
>>>The quote in my other post comes from a document called:-
>>>=20
>>>Downgrade Rights Chart
>>>at
>>>http://www.microsoft.com/LICENSING/resources/volbrief.a...
>>>or directly from
>>>http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/downloads/downgrade_...
>>>=20
>>>=20
>>>We all learn something every day !!
>>>=20
>>>--
>>>Regards,
>>>=20
>>>Mike
>>>--
>>>Mike Brannigan [MS]
>>>=20
>>>This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
>>>rights
>>>=20
>>>Please note I cannot respond to e-mailed questions.
>>>Please use these newsgroups
>>>=20
>>>"Antonio Amengual" <amengualserra@ono.com> wrote in message
>>>news:o Q4HDhWPCHA.2404@tkmsftngp11...
>>>well i see right answer in your new post
>>>i hav'nt see that in the agreement, people from client & partner =
>>
>>support
>>
>>>at MS Spain told me about the "downgradable" capabilities of XP
>>>apologise if i put my foot in it
>>>=20
>>>=20
>>>--
>>>=20
>>>Associate Expert Zone
>>>Expert Zone - http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
>>>=20
>>>=20
>>>=20
>>>XP Pro-2600-limpia+SP1
>>>=20
>>>por favor
>>>respuestas al grupo; asi nos beneficiamos todos
>>>no se responde personalmente
>>>=20
>>>saludos
>>>=20
>>>Antonio
>>>ms mvp dts
>>>=20
>>>"Mike Brannigan [MS]" <mikebran@online.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>>>news:#iHbcJWPCHA.2484@tkmsftngp13...
>>>
>>>>According to which part of the license agreement ??
>>>>
>>>>--
>>>>Regards,
>>>>
>>>>Mike
>>>>--
>>>>Mike Brannigan [MS]
>>>>
>>>>This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
>>>>rights
>>>>
>>>>Please note I cannot respond to e-mailed questions.
>>>>Please use these newsgroups
>>>>
>>>>"Antonio Amengual" <amengualserra@ono.com> wrote in message
>>>>news:o viJs$VPCHA.2520@tkmsftngp13...
>>>>Sorry, XP licence legitimates a PC with w2000 pro or NT Wkst =
>>
>>installed
>>
>>>>
>>>>--
>>>>
>>>>Associate Expert Zone
>>>>Expert Zone - http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>XP Pro-2600-limpia+SP1
>>>>
>>>>por favor
>>>>respuestas al grupo; asi nos beneficiamos todos
>>>>no se responde personalmente
>>>>
>>>>saludos
>>>>
>>>>Antonio
>>>>ms mvp dts
>>>>
>>>>"Mike Brannigan [MS]" <mikebran@online.microsoft.com> wrote in =
>>
>>message
>>
>>>>news:o evv6sVPCHA.2280@tkmsftngp13...
>>>>
>>>>>"scott" <screagan@forwardair.com> wrote in message
>>>>>news:12fa01c23d5a$41c69700$35ef2ecf@TKMSFTNGXA11...
>>>>>
>>>>>>If a machine comes with winxp is it legal to put win2k on
>>>>>>it instead of winxp..
>>>>>
>>>>>Yes - as long as you have bought and paid for a Windows 2000
>>>
>>>license.
>>>
>>>>>Windows XP does not have any downgrade options unless you are a =
>>
>>very
>>
>>>>>large corporate customer and get a specific contract with the OEM.
>>>>>You may not just use a friends Windows 2000 CD to install. Your
>>>>
>>>>license
>>>>
>>>>>is for Windows XP only.
>>>>>
>>>>>You should also be aware that if this was an OEM supplied PC then =
>>
>>to
>>
>>>>>replace the OS renders you out of support with the OEM.
>>>>>
>>>>>--
>>>>>Regards,
>>>>>
>>>>>Mike
>>>>>--
>>>>>Mike Brannigan [MS]
>>>>>
>>>>>This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers =
>>
>>no
>>
>>>>>rights
>>>>>
>>>>>Please note I cannot respond to e-mailed questions.
>>>>>Please use these newsgroups
>>>>>
>>>>>"scott" <screagan@forwardair.com> wrote in message
>>>>>news:12fa01c23d5a$41c69700$35ef2ecf@TKMSFTNGXA11...
>>>>>
>>>>>>If a machine comes with winxp is it legal to put win2k on
>>>>>>it instead of winxp..
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>=20
>>>=20
>
>
>
>>"Don Taylor" <dont@agora.rdrop.com> wrote in message =
>>news:Ko2dnd7864lZvHjfRVn-rw@scnresearch.com...
>>
>>>"David Candy" <.> writes:
>>>
>>>>AFAIK it is against the EULA and it is reccommended by MS. Try pinning =
>>
>>=3D
>>
>>> ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>>>
>>>>them down on it.
>>>
>>>=20
>>>AFAYK can you provide a pointer to the documents that I've once seen
>>>where this was described by MS? Material written by them would be so
>>>much more helpful than opinions by everybody else.
>>>=20
>>>Thank you
>>>=20
>>>
>>>>"Don Taylor" <dont@agora.rdrop.com> wrote in message =3D
>>>>news:69adneI2evt1BnnfRVn-jg@scnresearch.com...
>>>>
>>>>>"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> writes:
>>>>>
>>>>>>"Don Taylor" wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> <usasma@discussions.microsoft.com> writes:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>Installing a second copy would require another license and I don't
>>>>>>>>know if there would be any problems with the activation of it.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>=3D20
>>>>>>>Nope, wrong. Install your XP CD in one partition, activate as =3D
>>>>
>>>>usual.
>>>>
>>>>>>>Stick the same CD right back in, install XP in the other =
>>
>>partition,
>>
>>>>>>>activate as usual, activation goes right through without any =3D
>>>>
>>>>complaint.
>>>>
>>>>>>>=3D20
>>>>>>>(This is because ALL the critical items that are checked to =
>>
>>confirm
>>
>>>>>>>that they are the same and this is legal and that you haven't =
>>
>>tried
>>
>>>>>>>to install one copy on multiple different machines are EXACTLY THE =
>>
>>=3D
>>
>>>>SAME,
>>>>
>>>>>>>because it is on the SAME machine)
>>>>>
>>>>>=3D20
>>>>>
>>>>>> I am of the opinion that two installations of WinXP in the
>>>>>> same machine under one license is legal, but I don't think
>>>>>> it has ever been tested in court. As far as Microsoft is
>>>>>> concerned, though, it is a violation of their EULA and therefore
>>>>>> by their own self-serving definition "illegal".
>>>>>
>>>>>=3D20
>>>>>People have screamed their opposing positions on this question
>>>>>at each other over and over and over and over, in this group
>>>>>and in others, for a long time. Google can confirm this if you
>>>>>can think of appropriate keywords to use to search and find the
>>>>>arguments. It is my opinion that you aren't going to make
>>>>>anybody happy with this subject.
!