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ram for toshiba notebook

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June 1, 2005 2:52:12 AM

I have a toshiba notebook with 512ram (256 is on the motherboards). I want to upgrade and found this:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?item=N82E1682...

Does anyone know if its good memory? It seems really cheap thats why I'm wondering. Also, do notebooks take diffeent types of ram - i.e. 144-pin or 200-pin??

More about : ram toshiba notebook

June 1, 2005 8:08:28 PM

Nothing wrong with Kingmax.
It's a fairly well known brand.

Yes notebooks take different types of memory modules. For notbooks, you'll need SO-DIMM (Small Outline) memory. DDR SO-DIMM modules have 200-pins, whereas the normal DDR Desktop DIMMS have 184-pins.

An SDRAM SO-DIMM module is 144-pin. This is PC-133/100 memory.

On another note...
Keep in mind that 1GB SO-DIMM DDR memory is built with BGA chips and not TSOP chips. This is because you need 16 chips for 1GB notebook module, and only BGA chips will fit on the PCB board.

Take a look at the <A HREF="http://www.newegg.com/Product/ShowImage.asp?image=20-15... 1GB 200-Pin DDR SO-DIMM DDR 333 (PC 2700) Notebook Memory Model MSAD42D-KI - OEM" target="_new">picture</A> of this module.

The chips are KTI chips. They are most likely not tested as thouroughly as major-brand chips, which may (or may not) be a problem for your system. In some cases, non-major (UTT or other) chips perform very well, however in this case, I think these are the lower end chips.

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<font color=red>AIM BrentUnitedMem
June 2, 2005 2:55:28 PM

Thanks for the info. I'm wondering if I should just get Kingston memory as that is what Toshiba recommends. I don't want to mess anything up. I have a second question - I am using this computer for Photoshop work. I work with files in the 40mb size and 512mb ram makes it work fairly slow. If I only add another 256 to make it 768 or whatever - instead of 1gb, will I notice a big difference. Or should I just go for the 1gb.?
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June 2, 2005 4:16:04 PM

Since RAM is very cheap now and laptops don't have a lot of slots, I'd say go for the G if your machine supports it

Nothing is as easy as it looks
June 2, 2005 4:29:47 PM

Kingston is the largest manufacturer or memory modules. They are a reputable company. There two classes of Kingston modules I'd like to point out for you.
A. Kingston/Kingston (Kingston on Kingston)
B. Kingston/major (Kingston on Micron, for example)

Since Kingston only manufacturers memory, they buy chips from outside. Kingston/Kingston modules are built usuing chips labeled for Kingston, whereas Kingston/major modules are built buy Kingston using major-branded chips like Samsung and Micron.

'B.' is the preferable choice.

Under WINXP, you will notice a performance increase on most applications up to about 1GB, then your system will actually lose performance above 1GB for most applications.
This is because the unused memory is equal to a loss in performance. However, some applications do benefit from 2GB, but it's rare.

512MB + 256MB is not recommended. The motherboard chipset is divided by banks, not memory modules. A single memory module can occupy 1 or 2 banks on the motherboard. It is best to use a single bank, or an even number of banks. A 512MB module is normally 2 banks, whereas a 256MB module is normally 1 bank. Together, that makes 3 banks which is an odd number =p

3 banks will most likely work, but if you want to be peticular about your memory setup, best to keep it at 1 or two banks.

Note
*BANK = minimum number of memory chips that must work in tandem. Usually 8 chips.

Apologies for the long reply.


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<font color=red>AIM BrentUnitedMem
June 2, 2005 7:20:26 PM

ok, let me try to understand this. From what I have read on my system, it came with 512mb ram. 256 of that is on the motherboard, the other 256 is a slot that I can change out for more memory. It is the only slot I can alter. So, would it be ok to get a single 512 module and replace the existing 256, or would it be better to get a single 1gb to replace the 256 module? I will end up with 1.25mb ram if I do the 1 gb, is that really necessary or will 768 be enough improvement to even notice from the current 512??
June 2, 2005 8:00:46 PM

I see.

256MB is built in.
Plus you have an extra slot.

A)Going from 256MB to 256+512MB is a significant improvement.
B)Going from 256MB to 256+1024MB is a bigger improvement.

At this point, it's a decision of how much you want to spend and how much memory you actually need.

B is the better more expensive choice, and you can always keep the memory for your next laptop if you plan to upgrade in the future.

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<font color=red>AIM BrentUnitedMem<font color=white>
June 3, 2005 1:05:26 AM

ok, so what 1gb ram would you recommend?
June 3, 2005 6:49:04 PM

Best choice for memory in terms or reliability:

1GB SO-DIMM DDR-400:
1. Samsung Original, hard to find.
2. Micron Original $135, <A HREF="http://www.ld-technology.com/one_prod.php?pid=021541" target="_new">LD-Tech</A>
3. Crucial (with Micron chips) <A HREF="http://www.crucial.com/store/partspecs.Asp?IMODULE=CT12..." target="_new">$139.99 </A>

I'd go with Micron at $135. Lian Dong Tech is a good company.

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"Memory with lifetime warranty? So, whose lifetime is that?"
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<font color=red>AIM BrentUnitedMem<font color=white>
June 8, 2005 7:33:34 PM

I would not recommend it, but it should work okay.. And Kingston is a reputable manufacturer (the biggest one). The price is good, but it is "value RAM".

This module would fall into the Kingston/Kingston category as described above. As I mentioned, Kingston/Micron is a more reliable solution with a higher cost.

<font color=green>*****
"Memory with lifetime warranty? So, whose lifetime is that?"
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<font color=red>AIM BrentUnitedMem<font color=white>
!