[40k] Tale of RGMW gamers: fluff for my Nurgle LatD army (..

Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

Well, I'd threatened to do this before, and this weekend I was bored enough
for half an hour to sling something together. This is my first stab at any
significant 40k fluff. I've tried to get the feeling of that fevered purple
prose that 40k seems to generate without straying into parody. I've also
tried to capture some of the feel of the quiet and peacful agri-world that
is being invaded, as well as giving some thematic justification for some of
my other armies to fight on this world. This might become the basis for an
informal campaign on this world, since my buddy who plays Warhammer is
willing to play 40k but only using my armies. Observant readers will also
notice I'm stealing some names from Gene Wolfe; this is intentional, since
this happens throughout 40k, and particularly with the Death Guard (Terminus
Est, Typhon).

Criticism will be gratefully accepted, since I may well have written
something that contradicts canonical material - the only fluff sources I
have are some of the current codices and a small handful of the books.
Particularly, I may have messed up some organizational details with the
Traitor PDF and the Sisters of Battle. Anyway, here we go...

---
_Et in Arcadia ego_

The long summer has finally ended, and the Fall has come to Saltus. The
grain hangs heavy on its stalks and the herd-beasts have grown fat out on
the prairies. Harvesting will begin soon, and not long after it will be cold
enough to begin the slaughtering. But this year there is a faint scent on
the night breeze, a stench unfamiliar to this planet. Unknown to the farmers
and ranchers who populate this quiet agri-world, a single spore of contagion
has drifted down from space, from the Warp. His rusted armor and swollen
joints pain him; his bones ache in his torn and feverish flesh. This pleases
him, because this spore is Vodalus of the Death Guard, and he is Plague.

This year, the cicadas' droning buzz at night is louder than it ever has
been. The grain is heavy, but it is heavy with a corruption that drives men
mad before it kills. The kine are fat, because their flesh is gravid with
disease. And on the far side of the endless prairies, well away from the
lone spaceport where meat and grain have been sent out into the Imperium for
ten thousand years, something horrible has begun. One tiny town, a backwater
even on this backwater world, has been visited by a pestilence that kills
some, deranges others, and twists the remainder into inhuman monsters.
Vodalus has come bearing this pestilence in the name of Father Nurgle, and
his victims rally around him. Sick, mad, and dead, they lurch towards the
next village, blighting the countryside simply by walking through it.

As people in the surrounding towns begin to realize that something is going
wrong, madmen and prophets arise from the citizenry. Some call for cleansing
fires, pleading for the righteous wrath of the Emperor of Mankind to
cauterize this running wound. Others, especially those who have eaten the
poisoned grain and tainted meat, shout and sing that since all must come to
death, better to do so joyfully. Local PDF units splinter into factions and
turn against each other, with the majority renouncing their oaths of service
to pledge themselves to Nurgle. First among these turncoats are the traitors
of the 113th Home Guard. They have slain their commissars and butchered
their priests at the behest of Agitators and demagogues; now they march
under the Plague Banner as the Recusant 113th.

For the past few hundred years, the Ecclesiarchy has maintained a small
scriptorium on this world. Before the first harvest moon arrives, the tiny
convent discovers what is happening as refugees begin streaming in. The
Abbess rapidly sends out Missions of the Order Militant to contain the
rampaging Plague. The Sisters of Battle burn the poisoned fields to try and
check its growth; eventually they burn the poisoned villages, and villagers,
as well. Raging brushfires a thousand miles wide race across the world,
barely faster than the infestation itself.

At the capital, an astropath screams the Imperial governor's plea for help
out into the void, so desperate for deliverance that she is heedless of who
might hear it. A passing Space Marine battlegroup, which might fight to
save Saltus or scorch it clean from orbit. The far-wandering and
inscrutable Eldar, who might aid one side, or both, or neither. Or even the
first probing tentacles of a Tyranid hive fleet which will devour pure and
tainted alike without pausing to tell the difference.

On Saltus, it is the Year of the Plague.

--
Ken Coble

Will you still have a song to sing
When the razor boy comes
And takes your fancy things away?
Will you still be singing it
On that cold and windy day?
--Steely Dan, "Razor Boy"
20 answers Last reply
More about tale rgmw gamers fluff nurgle latd army
  1. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    "Kenneth Coble" <flintlocklaser@triad.rr.com> wrote in message
    news:jQQNd.64855$K72.7807380@twister.southeast.rr.com...
    LONG Snip


    That was very good fluff. There may be a scenario with BFG, kill teams, and
    40K armies here.

    berto
  2. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    "Kenneth Coble" <flintlocklaser@triad.rr.com> wrote in message
    news:jQQNd.64855$K72.7807380@twister.southeast.rr.com...
    > Well, I'd threatened to do this before, and this weekend I was bored
    > enough for half an hour to sling something together. This is my first
    > stab at any significant 40k fluff. I've tried to get the feeling of that
    > fevered purple prose that 40k seems to generate without straying into
    > parody. I've also tried to capture some of the feel of the quiet and
    > peacful agri-world that is being invaded, as well as giving some thematic
    > justification for some of my other armies to fight on this world. This
    > might become the basis for an informal campaign on this world, since my
    > buddy who plays Warhammer is willing to play 40k but only using my armies.
    > Observant readers will also notice I'm stealing some names from Gene
    > Wolfe; this is intentional, since this happens throughout 40k, and
    > particularly with the Death Guard (Terminus Est, Typhon).

    Not sure who Gene Wolfe is, but Typhon was the name of the youngest of the
    Greek Titans, ugly fella with something in the region of a hundred eyes.
    There GW's just following its usual trend of naming Marines after
    mythological characters.

    > For the past few hundred years, the Ecclesiarchy has maintained a small
    > scriptorium on this world. Before the first harvest moon arrives, the tiny
    > convent discovers what is happening as refugees begin streaming in. The
    > Abbess rapidly sends out Missions of the Order Militant to contain the
    > rampaging Plague.

    Do Sisters have Abbesses or just Canonesses?

    The Sisters of Battle burn the poisoned fields to try and
    > check its growth; eventually they burn the poisoned villages, and
    > villagers, as well. Raging brushfires a thousand miles wide race across
    > the world, barely faster than the infestation itself.
    >
    > At the capital, an astropath screams the Imperial governor's plea for help
    > out into the void, so desperate for deliverance that she is heedless of
    > who might hear it. A passing Space Marine battlegroup, which might fight
    > to save Saltus or scorch it clean from orbit. The far-wandering and
    > inscrutable Eldar, who might aid one side, or both, or neither. Or even
    > the first probing tentacles of a Tyranid hive fleet which will devour pure
    > and tainted alike without pausing to tell the difference.
    >
    > On Saltus, it is the Year of the Plague.

    Nicely done - can't see anything here that would conflict with established
    background.

    Philip Bowles
  3. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    Philip Bowles wrote:

    <snip>
    >
    > Not sure who Gene Wolfe is, but Typhon was the name of the youngest
    > of the Greek Titans, ugly fella with something in the region of a
    > hundred eyes. There GW's just following its usual trend of naming
    > Marines after mythological characters.
    >

    Gene Wolfe is an American science-fiction writer who I can't recommend
    highly enough. He uses mythological names in his work as well, but there's
    way too many things from his 4-volume "The Book of the New Sun" series being
    used in 40k for it to be coincidence: autarch, Severian, Terminus Est,
    Typhon, and others I can't think of right off the top of my head. Now it's
    just barely possible that for the mythological names they were both just
    mining the same old books, but Terminus Est is the name of the sword used by
    the protagonist in New Sun, and I'm unaware of any classical reference that
    matches that - so I figure someone up there at GW is a big Gene Wolfe fan.

    >> For the past few hundred years, the Ecclesiarchy has maintained a
    >> small scriptorium on this world. Before the first harvest moon
    >> arrives, the tiny convent discovers what is happening as refugees
    >> begin str eamingin.The Abbess rapidly sends out Missions of the
    >> Order Militant to contain the rampaging Plague.
    >
    > Do Sisters have Abbesses or just Canonesses?

    Good point, and I have no idea. I just automatically put Abbess since this
    was a small abbey - perhaps Abbess could be a "positional" title, like what
    I understand was the old implication of Commodore - you were a Commodore if
    you commanded a group of x number of ships, but your actual rank was still
    captain. Similarly, you might be an Abbess if the outpost you control is an
    Abbey. Looking through my Witch Hunters book, I see a reference to a
    "Prioress" on p. 27, but no place for this rank on the chart on p. 11.
    Maybe a Prioress (or Abbess) is the title for someone commanding an mixed
    establishment of multiple orders? This would fit the setting I'm trying to
    create, of an outpost primarily composed of non-militant Orders like the
    Order Dialogous, but with a small attached force of an Order Militant.

    <snip>
    >>
    >> On Saltus, it is the Year of the Plague.
    >
    > Nicely done - can't see anything here that would conflict with
    > established background.
    >
    > Philip Bowles

    Cool! Thanks for looking it over, and I'm glad you liked it.
    --
    Ken Coble

    Will you still have a song to sing
    When the razor boy comes
    And takes your fancy things away?
    Will you still be singing it
    On that cold and windy day?
    --Steely Dan, "Razor Boy"
  4. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    Berto wrote:
    > "Kenneth Coble" <flintlocklaser@triad.rr.com> wrote in message
    > news:jQQNd.64855$K72.7807380@twister.southeast.rr.com...
    > LONG Snip
    >
    >
    > That was very good fluff. There may be a scenario with BFG, kill
    > teams, and 40K armies here.
    >

    Thanks, glad you enjoyed it. I did make an effort to write something that
    would lend itself to 40k scenarios from Kill-Team all the way up to 2500
    point grand battles, but BFG never crossed my mind. Oddly enough, my
    non-40k playing buddy _does_ have a tiny amount of BFG stuff, so maybe we
    can work a few games of that in as well! And it does fit the setting - as
    all these groups converge on Saltus, either to quell the uprising or take
    advantage of the situation, space combat would be inevitable! Thanks for
    pointing this out.

    --
    Ken Coble

    Will you still have a song to sing
    When the razor boy comes
    And takes your fancy things away?
    Will you still be singing it
    On that cold and windy day?
    --Steely Dan, "Razor Boy"
  5. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    "Kenneth Coble" <flintlocklaser@triad.rr.com> wrote in message
    news:oz0Od.65002$K72.7976979@twister.southeast.rr.com...
    > Philip Bowles wrote:
    >
    > <snip>
    >>
    >> Not sure who Gene Wolfe is, but Typhon was the name of the youngest
    >> of the Greek Titans, ugly fella with something in the region of a
    >> hundred eyes. There GW's just following its usual trend of naming
    >> Marines after mythological characters.
    >>
    >
    > Gene Wolfe is an American science-fiction writer who I can't recommend
    > highly enough. He uses mythological names in his work as well, but
    > there's way too many things from his 4-volume "The Book of the New Sun"
    > series being used in 40k for it to be coincidence: autarch, Severian,
    > Terminus Est, Typhon, and others I can't think of right off the top of my
    > head. Now it's just barely possible that for the mythological names they
    > were both just mining the same old books, but Terminus Est is the name of
    > the sword used by the protagonist in New Sun, and I'm unaware of any
    > classical reference that matches that - so I figure someone up there at GW
    > is a big Gene Wolfe fan.
    >
    Well its GW, we can't expect them to be original now can we......

    But I agree, the Books of the New Sun are excellent, as are most of his
    other works.

    --
    estarriol
  6. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    "Kenneth Coble" <flintlocklaser@triad.rr.com> wrote in message
    news:oz0Od.65002$K72.7976979@twister.southeast.rr.com...
    > Philip Bowles wrote:
    >
    > <snip>
    >>
    >> Not sure who Gene Wolfe is, but Typhon was the name of the youngest
    >> of the Greek Titans, ugly fella with something in the region of a
    >> hundred eyes. There GW's just following its usual trend of naming
    >> Marines after mythological characters.
    >>
    >
    > Gene Wolfe is an American science-fiction writer who I can't recommend

    Oh, I'll give him a miss then...

    > highly enough.

    Or perhaps I should have finished the sentence... I haven't been keeping up
    with sci-fi at all, haven't read any in years, though I've heard there are
    quite a few good new writers in the field.

    He uses mythological names in his work as well, but there's
    > way too many things from his 4-volume "The Book of the New Sun" series
    > being used in 40k for it to be coincidence: autarch,

    That's just a title, and a logical one considering the prior existence of
    Exarchs. Credit to GW here, they're actually trying to tie Autarch fluff
    into the original meaning of the word ('autarchy' shares the same etymology
    as 'autocracy').

    >Severian,

    Don't know this one in 40k, I don't think.

    >Terminus Est,

    A quick google reveals that GW took this name from a French hotel... Seems
    another pinch from well-known sayings - maybe Magnus or Ahriman has a ship
    called "Tempus Fugit"?

    > Typhon, and others I can't think of right off the top of my head.

    It looks very much as though both were fairly liberally pinching things from
    real world cultures and mythologies. Now, if there's some connection between
    the subjects of the names it might be more convincing.

    Now it's
    > just barely possible that for the mythological names they were both just
    > mining the same old books, but Terminus Est is the name of the sword used
    > by the protagonist in New Sun, and I'm unaware of any classical reference
    > that matches that - so I figure someone up there at GW is a big Gene Wolfe
    > fan.

    There probably is a connection there - in itself, Terminus Est ("dividing
    line") isn't a very logical name for a Chaos ship, it just sounds sinister
    to the uneducated due to its similarity to 'terminal'. It looks like the
    sort of thing that would have been pinched uncomprehending by a GW parrot
    who saw it. Not convinced by the others, though.

    Similarly, you might be an Abbess if the outpost you control is an
    > Abbey. Looking through my Witch Hunters book, I see a reference to a
    > "Prioress" on p. 27, but no place for this rank on the chart on p. 11.

    Someone who controls a priory, of course... Of course, taking that logic
    further a Canoness is either someone who controls a bishop, or a misspelt
    artillery commander.

    Philip Bowles
  7. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    Philip Bowles wrote:
    <snip>
    >> Gene Wolfe is an American science-fiction writer who I can't
    >> recommend
    >
    > Oh, I'll give him a miss then...

    Aaagh!

    >> highly enough.
    >
    > Or perhaps I should have finished the sentence... I haven't been
    > keeping up with sci-fi at all, haven't read any in years, though I've
    > heard there are quite a few good new writers in the field.

    Whew, that's better. Having said that, the "Book of the New Sun" stuff has
    been around since the very early 80's (book one being published in 1980, and
    book four coming out in 1982). This timeframe is why I tend to think that
    GW may well have cribbed some names from him. Let me make it clear that I'm
    not accusing them of plagarization, since the GW stuff winds up being
    totally unconnected to Wolfe's work other than the names - and lord knows
    it's hard to come up with good scifi/fantasy names that don't sound stupid,
    so I can certainly see why borrowing from one source or another would occur.
    Besides, as I said most of Wolfe's names and exotic words are taken from
    real-world history, so mining Wolfe means you're effectively mining history
    books. He really is quite good - possibly the only really literary current
    sci-fi/fantasy writer I can think of. If you happen to see any of his stuff
    in the local library, give it a whirl if time allows.

    > He uses mythological names in his work as well, but there's
    >> way too many things from his 4-volume "The Book of the New Sun"
    >> series being used in 40k for it to be coincidence: autarch,
    >
    > That's just a title, and a logical one considering the prior
    > existence of Exarchs. Credit to GW here, they're actually trying to
    > tie Autarch fluff into the original meaning of the word ('autarchy'
    > shares the same etymology as 'autocracy').
    >

    True - but the Autarch of "New Sun" is a constant presence through the
    books, as ruler of the Commonwealth the narrator lives in. Heck, the title
    of the fourth book in the series is "The Citadel of the Autarch," written in
    1982! I don't want to tell you why Autarch is such a perfect name for this
    person, since if you ever read the books it will be a bit of a spoiler.

    >> Severian,
    >
    > Don't know this one in 40k, I don't think.

    There's a "Sergeant Severian" caption under the picture of a bike squad on
    p. 62 of the new Space Marine Codex. Severian is the name of the
    protagonist of "New Sun."

    >
    >> Terminus Est,
    >
    > A quick google reveals that GW took this name from a French hotel...
    > Seems another pinch from well-known sayings - maybe Magnus or Ahriman
    > has a ship called "Tempus Fugit"?

    Termius Est is the heirloom-quality executioner's sword that Severian
    carries in the "Book of the New Sun."

    >> Typhon, and others I can't think of right off the top of my head.
    >
    > It looks very much as though both were fairly liberally pinching
    > things from real world cultures and mythologies.

    A villainous former ruler of the world in "New Sun" and a major off-screen
    personality in the loosely connected series "Book of the Long Sun."

    > Now, if there's some
    > connection between the subjects of the names it might be more
    > convincing.

    Well, for me it's just that these are all _major_ names from "New Sun." The
    protagonist, his legendary sword, the leader of his country, and one of the
    main named villains he has to confront. To me, this seems a bit much for
    mere coincidence. However, it doesn't really matter, except in the sense
    that I'll continue this proud tradition by using more names from Wolfe's
    work in my homebrewed fluff, but there's probably no real way to prove
    either of our positions unless someone at GW says either "yeah, we nicked
    some names from Wolfe because we're big fans" or "sorry, never heard of
    him."

    > Now it's
    >> just barely possible that for the mythological names they were both
    >> just mining the same old books, but Terminus Est is the name of the
    >> sword used by the protagonist in New Sun, and I'm unaware of any
    >> classical reference that matches that - so I figure someone up there
    >> at GW is a big Gene Wolfe fan.
    >
    > There probably is a connection there - in itself, Terminus Est
    > ("dividing line") isn't a very logical name for a Chaos ship, it just
    > sounds sinister to the uneducated due to its similarity to
    > 'terminal'. It looks like the sort of thing that would have been
    > pinched uncomprehending by a GW parrot who saw it. Not convinced by
    > the others, though.

    There are some amusing moments in the "New Sun" books when various people
    mistranslate the inscription on his sword. If memory serves, the only
    person who translates it correctly is the protagonist, when he is given the
    sword by the master of his guild. It does strike me as particularly
    unfitting for a Nurgle-esque starship, though. Perhaps it would have been
    better for something exemplifying swift and decisve death, rather than
    festering plagues?

    >
    > Similarly, you might be an Abbess if the outpost you control is an
    >> Abbey. Looking through my Witch Hunters book, I see a reference to a
    >> "Prioress" on p. 27, but no place for this rank on the chart on p.
    >> 11.
    >
    > Someone who controls a priory, of course... Of course, taking that
    > logic further a Canoness is either someone who controls a bishop, or
    > a misspelt artillery commander.
    >

    Well, I knew what a Prioress was in the real world - my point was that it's
    official confirmation that titles exist beyond the rather slim table of
    organization we get on p. 11 of C: Witch Hunters, and I'm more than willing
    to use that as a justification for calling my character "Abbess." It would
    be nice if there was a less vague and confusing source for Ecclesiarchical
    and SoB hierarchy and titles, but then again the less stuff GW nails down
    the more stuff I get to make up!

    --
    Ken Coble

    Will you still have a song to sing
    When the razor boy comes
    And takes your fancy things away?
    Will you still be singing it
    On that cold and windy day?
    --Steely Dan, "Razor Boy"
  8. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    estarriol wrote:
    <snip>
    > But I agree, the Books of the New Sun are excellent, as are most of
    > his other works.

    Absolutely. If you haven't picked up his two new ones, "The Knight" and
    "The Wizard," allow me to give them the highest possible recommendation.
    Wonderful stuff. Also, one of his lesser-known gems is the "Soldier of the
    Mists"/"Soldier of Arete" pair, which have recently been re-released as
    "Latro in the Mists." It's a Hellenistic version of the movie "Memento."
    Ok, not really, but it is the story of a Latin mercenary wandering around
    ancient Greece with anterograde amnesia, and the books are told through the
    device of the notes he makes for himself each night before he falls asleep
    and forgets everything that has happened to him. It's nowhere near as
    clumsy as I make it sound...

    --
    Ken Coble

    Will you still have a song to sing
    When the razor boy comes
    And takes your fancy things away?
    Will you still be singing it
    On that cold and windy day?
    --Steely Dan, "Razor Boy"
  9. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    "Kenneth Coble" <flintlocklaser@triad.rr.com> wrote in message
    news:DG7Od.67828$K72.8061124@twister.southeast.rr.com...
    > Philip Bowles wrote:
    > <snip>
    >>> highly enough.
    >>
    >> Or perhaps I should have finished the sentence... I haven't been
    >> keeping up with sci-fi at all, haven't read any in years, though I've
    >> heard there are quite a few good new writers in the field.
    >
    > Whew, that's better. Having said that, the "Book of the New Sun" stuff
    > has been around since the very early 80's (book one being published in
    > 1980, and book four coming out in 1982).

    Well, that's a better record than Robert Jordan or David Brin, at least... I
    won't be able to refresh my memory of Wheel of Time Books 1-10 (and the
    prequel) before Book 11 comes along in October, which is a bit of a
    nuisance. Brin annoyingly went and wrote the first book of his second Uplift
    Trilogy (Brightness Reef) with a particularly good cliffhanger, and it took
    years for the next two books to come along (and they weren't that great). I
    think the last sci-fi writer I started reading was Mary Doria Russel in the
    late '90s, and I've only read her first two books (for that matter I'm not
    sure she's made any more).

    This timeframe is why I tend to think that
    > GW may well have cribbed some names from him. Let me make it clear that
    > I'm not accusing them of plagarization,

    Perish the thought...

    since the GW stuff winds up being
    > totally unconnected to Wolfe's work other than the names - and lord knows
    > it's hard to come up with good scifi/fantasy names that don't sound
    > stupid, so I can certainly see why borrowing from one source or another
    > would occur. Besides, as I said most of Wolfe's names and exotic words are
    > taken from real-world history, so mining Wolfe means you're effectively
    > mining history books. He really is quite good - possibly the only really
    > literary current sci-fi/fantasy writer I can think of. If you happen to
    > see any of his stuff in the local library, give it a whirl if time allows.

    I'm not even sure they have libraries in Australia...

    >> Now it's
    >>> just barely possible that for the mythological names they were both
    >>> just mining the same old books, but Terminus Est is the name of the
    >>> sword used by the protagonist in New Sun, and I'm unaware of any
    >>> classical reference that matches that - so I figure someone up there
    >>> at GW is a big Gene Wolfe fan.
    >>
    >> There probably is a connection there - in itself, Terminus Est
    >> ("dividing line") isn't a very logical name for a Chaos ship, it just
    >> sounds sinister to the uneducated due to its similarity to
    >> 'terminal'. It looks like the sort of thing that would have been
    >> pinched uncomprehending by a GW parrot who saw it. Not convinced by
    >> the others, though.
    >
    > There are some amusing moments in the "New Sun" books when various people
    > mistranslate the inscription on his sword. If memory serves, the only
    > person who translates it correctly is the protagonist, when he is given
    > the sword by the master of his guild.

    Let me guess, there was some sort of prophecy indicating that he'd do just
    that? Is this sci-fi or future fantasy? Hang on, the fellow's carrying a
    sword - forget it, silly question...

    Philip Bowles
  10. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    Philip Bowles wrote:

    > Let me guess, there was some sort of prophecy indicating that he'd do
    > just that? Is this sci-fi or future fantasy? Hang on, the fellow's
    > carrying a sword - forget it, silly question...
    >
    Actually, his beginnings are totally inauspicious, not at all what you'd
    expect. Again, I don't want to give anything away just in case you pick
    them up anytime soon, but the circumstances under which he recieves his
    sword are the exact opposite of your typical "marked by destiny for
    greatness" cliche - and the only reason he knows the correct translation is
    because the guild he's a member of (The Order of the Seekers for Truth and
    Penitence - popularly known as the Torturer's Guild) makes a point of
    teaching some ancient languages. And it sort of straddles the line between
    future fantasy and sci-fi... hell, I really don't want to give anything else
    away. It's just really damn good.

    I also agree with you re: the second half of Brin's "Uplift War" books. I
    loved the first ones, and when the first book of the second trilogy came out
    I was ecstatic. Then, long, long wait, and the next two books were just not
    up to snuff. For me, the worst thing about them was the way he threw away
    the wonderful, galaxy-spanning scope the setting would allow in favor of
    mucking about (literally, for most of one of the books) on some backwater
    planet - then bang, a hugely unsatisfying _deus ex machina_ ending. The
    last time I felt like a series had so much promise and managed to squander
    it at the end was Gregory Benford's "Galactic Center" series.

    --
    Ken Coble

    Will you still have a song to sing
    When the razor boy comes
    And takes your fancy things away?
    Will you still be singing it
    On that cold and windy day?
    --Steely Dan, "Razor Boy"
  11. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    "Kenneth Coble" <flintlocklaser@triad.rr.com> wrote in message
    news:DL9Od.67849$K72.8078084@twister.southeast.rr.com...
    > Philip Bowles wrote:
    >

    > I also agree with you re: the second half of Brin's "Uplift War" books. I
    > loved the first ones, and when the first book of the second trilogy came
    > out I was ecstatic.

    Well, it was a far better book than the others before or since, which had
    basically been fun pulp and less than original. "Sundiver" was
    unimpressive - if I'd started with that rather than "The Uplift War" I doubt
    I'd have read the rest of the series, and the Perseus story wasn't really
    made for sci-fi. Though his choices of source material for the second
    (Mutiny on the Bounty) and fourth (Huckleberry Finn) books were unusual for
    the genre. The fourth book had more intelligence to it - some clever plays
    on language, and more of an exploration of the setting and culture Brin had
    created. I think it was the fact that they left the planet (with, by a
    staggering series of coincidences, all the main characters aboard the
    spacecraft) in the fifth book that rather spoiled it.

    Then, long, long wait, and the next two books were just not
    > up to snuff. For me, the worst thing about them was the way he threw away
    > the wonderful, galaxy-spanning scope the setting would allow in favor of
    > mucking about (literally, for most of one of the books) on some backwater
    > planet

    I disagree with that - he'd already given us a pretty good idea of the scope
    of the story and the Uplift cultures in the previous books; I liked the way
    he explored what happened to a group of settlers completely removed from
    that culture, and also how they adjusted to encountering it again.

    > - then bang, a hugely unsatisfying _deus ex machina_ ending.

    That was bad, to be sure. Plus the whole Progenitor story turned out to be
    rather a damp squib - nothing of much consequence actually came from it.
    They had a mummy, but that was about it. With the build-up in books 2 and 3,
    and the hints throughout 4 that the ship would have a major part to play in
    the rest of the series, it was a disappointment.

    Philip Bowles
  12. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    > There probably is a connection there - in itself, Terminus Est ("dividing
    > line")

    Er...if you try to reason it through without much knowledge of
    latin...it becomes End Is Here.

    The End Is Here.

    I can see it happening now...

    Octavulg
  13. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    "Octavulg" <octavulg@netscape.net> wrote in message
    news:lZaOd.228447$Np3.9495788@ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca...
    >> There probably is a connection there - in itself, Terminus Est ("dividing
    >> line")
    >
    > Er...if you try to reason it through without much knowledge of latin...it
    > becomes End Is Here.
    >
    > The End Is Here.

    Strictly literally it simply reads "The End Is" or "It is the end", although
    terminus also translates as 'border' or 'boundary'. "Terminus Est" as an
    expression, though, is one of those Latin forms that has become anglicised
    over time as an equivalent of a recognised English concept - the point where
    a boundary is found, or a dividing line.

    Philip Bowles
  14. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    Kenneth Coble wrote:
    > He really is quite good - possibly the only really literary current
    > sci-fi/fantasy writer I can think of. If you happen to see any of
    his stuff
    > in the local library, give it a whirl if time allows.
    >

    Then you definitley owe it to yourself to have a look at Iain M Banks -
    who also writes 'regular' fiction under the name Iain Banks, and adds
    the M for his sci-fi work, much of which is extremely good.

    The majority, though not all of his sci-fi is set in a future utopian
    vision of the galaxy called 'The Culture'. And to see if you find his
    theme interesting at all have a look at an essay he wrote which adds a
    bit of background to his universe and explains how he arrived at some
    of the concepts.

    "A few notes on the Culture" -
    http://www.cs.bris.ac.uk/~stefan/culture.html

    Regards
    Plessiez
  15. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    Robert Singers wrote:
    > Out from under a rock popped Plessiez and said
    >
    > > The majority, though not all of his sci-fi is set in a future
    utopian
    > > vision of the galaxy called 'The Culture'. And to see if you find
    his
    > > theme interesting at all have a look at an essay he wrote which
    adds a
    > > bit of background to his universe and explains how he arrived at
    some
    > > of the concepts.
    >
    > <nitpick>The Galaxy isn't called "the Culture". The culture from
    which
    > many of the characters come from is simply called "the culture" and
    is one
    > of many in the Galaxy.</nitpick>
    >

    Very true, though the way my sentence is meant to scan was not:

    a future utopian vision of the (galaxy called The Culture)

    but:

    a (future utopian vision (of the galaxy/future/space)) called the
    Culture.

    Which I admit is a bit of a leap to make.

    Regards
    Plessiez
  16. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    Out from under a rock popped Plessiez and said

    > The majority, though not all of his sci-fi is set in a future utopian
    > vision of the galaxy called 'The Culture'. And to see if you find his
    > theme interesting at all have a look at an essay he wrote which adds a
    > bit of background to his universe and explains how he arrived at some
    > of the concepts.

    <nitpick>The Galaxy isn't called "the Culture". The culture from which
    many of the characters come from is simply called "the culture" and is one
    of many in the Galaxy.</nitpick>

    One of the things I do like about the culture is their ship names
    http://www.saunalahti.fi/~mjhuur1/projects/banks/ships.html

    --
    Rob Singers RGMW FAQ Maintainer. See it @ http://www.rgmw.org
    Send submissions to submissions at rgmw dot org changing the obvious.
    "I present to RGMW....the real life model for StrongBad." (c) Inc 2003
    Credo Elvem ipsum etiam vivere
  17. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    Robert Singers wrote:
    > Out from under a rock popped Plessiez and said
    >
    >> The majority, though not all of his sci-fi is set in a future utopian
    >> vision of the galaxy called 'The Culture'. And to see if you find his
    >> theme interesting at all have a look at an essay he wrote which adds
    >> a bit of background to his universe and explains how he arrived at
    >> some of the concepts.
    >
    > <nitpick>The Galaxy isn't called "the Culture". The culture from
    > which many of the characters come from is simply called "the culture"
    > and is one of many in the Galaxy.</nitpick>
    >
    > One of the things I do like about the culture is their ship names
    > http://www.saunalahti.fi/~mjhuur1/projects/banks/ships.html


    I agree, Banks' science fiction is excellent - although I feel his
    mainstream work is decidedly hit-or-miss. Still, I think I've read all of
    his Culture books, and they were all good. Another sci-fi author to look
    into is Banks' protege, Ken MacLeod. I can't say I buy his politics (which
    seem to be a lot like Banks', only more extreme), but he makes some
    interesting projections and carries them in interesting directions.

    --
    Ken Coble

    Will you still have a song to sing
    When the razor boy comes
    And takes your fancy things away?
    Will you still be singing it
    On that cold and windy day?
    --Steely Dan, "Razor Boy"
  18. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    Out from under a rock popped Kenneth Coble and said

    > I agree, Banks' science fiction is excellent - although I feel his
    > mainstream work is decidedly hit-or-miss. Still, I think I've read
    > all of his Culture books, and they were all good. Another sci-fi
    > author to look into is Banks' protege, Ken MacLeod. I can't say I buy
    > his politics (which seem to be a lot like Banks', only more extreme),
    > but he makes some interesting projections and carries them in
    > interesting directions.

    Iain M Banks, Neal Stephenson, and Peter F Hamilton would be perhaps best
    of the SciFi authors in the last few years.

    --
    Rob Singers RGMW FAQ Maintainer. See it @ http://www.rgmw.org
    Send submissions to submissions at rgmw dot org changing the obvious.
    "I present to RGMW....the real life model for StrongBad." (c) Inc 2003
    Credo Elvem ipsum etiam vivere
  19. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    On the 8 Feb 2005, "Philip Bowles" <pbowles@aol.com> wrote:

    <snip>

    > There probably is a connection there - in itself, Terminus Est ("dividing
    > line") isn't a very logical name for a Chaos ship

    It wasn't a Chaos ship when it was built - it was part of the Death
    Guard fleet well before the Heresy. I read some fluff somewhere that a
    number of Imperial ships were based on the design, including the fatal
    flaw in (IIRC) the warp shields that contributed towards the corruption
    of the original. Consequently, a large number of them became lost to
    Chaos over the years.

    --
    Jades' First Encounters Site - http://www.jades.org/ffe.htm
    The best Frontier: First Encounters site on the Web.

    nospam@jades.org /is/ a real email address!
  20. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    "Kenneth Coble" <flintlocklaser@triad.rr.com> wrote in message
    news:M18Od.67838$K72.8062751@twister.southeast.rr.com...
    > estarriol wrote:
    > <snip>
    >> But I agree, the Books of the New Sun are excellent, as are most of
    >> his other works.
    >
    > Absolutely. If you haven't picked up his two new ones, "The Knight" and
    > "The Wizard," allow me to give them the highest possible recommendation.
    > Wonderful stuff. Also, one of his lesser-known gems is the "Soldier of
    > the Mists"/"Soldier of Arete" pair, which have recently been re-released
    > as "Latro in the Mists." It's a Hellenistic version of the movie
    > "Memento." Ok, not really, but it is the story of a Latin mercenary
    > wandering around ancient Greece with anterograde amnesia, and the books
    > are told through the device of the notes he makes for himself each night
    > before he falls asleep and forgets everything that has happened to him.
    > It's nowhere near as clumsy as I make it sound...
    >
    Ahhh I didn't realise he had written a second, I had read Soldier in the
    Mist years ago.

    --
    estarriol
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