Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Do you trust Cloud Computing?

Tags:
  • Cloud Computing
  • Business Computing
Last response: in Business Computing
Share
February 21, 2012 1:40:43 PM

Hello,
I've created a questionnaire that i will use to analyse a user's trust in Cloud Computing, if you could spare a minute could you please contribute. All answers are recorded anonomously and will help me complete my dissertation.
Link: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dE...

Thanks :) 

More about : trust cloud computing

February 21, 2012 4:49:39 PM

Hi :) 

No...

All the best Brett :) 
February 21, 2012 5:08:00 PM

Hate clicking on links.
Overall, Yes I trust it - Will I Use it - No
Related resources
February 21, 2012 5:14:45 PM

NO, I will never trust my data to Skynet.
February 21, 2012 5:30:39 PM

The only safe place for my data is 100% under my control. And why would I want to pay for software that someone else owns or has control of?
February 21, 2012 5:34:26 PM

No.
They only thing safe is a computer(or a network) that has zero connection to the internet/outside world...

Network security 101....
February 21, 2012 5:44:30 PM

drwho1 said:
NO, I will never trust my data to Skynet.

Yea Machines may use your data to take over the world. Where is John Connor when ya need him?
February 21, 2012 5:45:14 PM

No, It will be like a Data Pawn shop, or U-Store-It shed, If you don't pay, or play by their rules they will hold your data ransom for your cash.
February 21, 2012 6:04:29 PM

I would use cloud only as a back-up. All the computing -- locally.
February 21, 2012 6:34:00 PM

HELL NO!!!
February 21, 2012 6:55:34 PM

No Way.....
February 21, 2012 7:04:14 PM

I don't like the term "Cloud Computing". We have no idea what server OS and software is being used by the vendor and what they are doing to ensure security from hackers. We have no idea what (if any) security protocols are actually hack-proof.

All we hear in the news is that hackers breached another site and stole sensitive data. We never hear things, like "the data would have been safe if only they had used software X or security strategy Y".
February 21, 2012 7:24:42 PM

yes for stuff like music or movies and other non personal stuff...

but then again, i pay with c/c everywher and trust the waitess when she walks away with it
February 25, 2012 5:29:08 AM

Dogsnake said:
The only safe place for my data is 100% under my control. And why would I want to pay for software that someone else owns or has control of?

You mean like Window and OSX LOL Logic Failed.
February 25, 2012 6:46:59 AM

Boopoo said:
You mean like Window and OSX LOL Logic Failed.



-_- how long you gonna troll? we all know what he meant and he is absolutely right.

Ontopic, I personally don't use it since I don't like companies peaking into what I put up (might want to store a legit copy of a show and they might think its piracy. but oh wait in there ToU which is 400 pages long it might make a reference to "any suspicious activity will be reported and comp will be seized)

I know im mostly just paranoid, but I'd rather be paranoid then have my data stolen.
February 25, 2012 7:21:26 AM

Fail ^
February 25, 2012 7:35:34 AM

I know I am paranoid but they really are out to get us all. :pt1cable: 
February 25, 2012 10:12:34 AM

Security for this kind of stuff can't be guaranteed, ever.

It can be nice for data you don't care about, but want it to be available from everywhere and not only to yourself.

If it was for yourself only, I don't really see the need in the days of 2.5" external/hot swapable SSDs and Terrabyte HDDs.
February 25, 2012 10:33:24 AM

Another no
February 25, 2012 8:28:04 PM

I dont think that cloud based systems are generally insecure, but i wouldn´t store data on googles (or someoneelses) servers that may be interesting for someone else. Just for the case they are...
April 12, 2012 7:13:05 PM

I agree with the guy that said you have not defined your question well enough, especially concerning a disseration.

I assume you are aware that company's can create and utilize a private cloud, i'm just going to figure thats not what were talking about here and that your definition is infrastructor as a service, software as a service, or data backup and archiving.

Regarding security... sure why not. If your data is compromised, you have certain rights for compensation based on a pre-negotiated contract.

When it comes to being concerned with sla's and downtime, i would fully recommend keeping it in house... nothing worse than having half the company calling you and theres nothing you can do but wait for your vendor to get it fixed, while management is reminiding you how much money your (they're) losing per hour.


p.s. i really like the tom's hardware forums, but i can never tell if people are talking about userland or enterprise systems. Obviously there are different concerns and viewpoints for each scenario.
April 14, 2012 8:47:42 PM

One of the big problems is that internet access in many parts of the world is still pretty primitive.
May 29, 2012 1:24:03 PM

davidp90 said:
Hello,
I've created a questionnaire that i will use to analyse a user's trust in Cloud Computing, if you could spare a minute could you please contribute. All answers are recorded anonomously and will help me complete my dissertation.
Link: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dE...

Thanks :) 

In the beginning of the cloud era, there were really many negative opinions related to the security aspect of cloud computing. But, now it has been clarified by IT experts that cloud is really safe. A cloud computing service provider bestows utmost security on its clients’ data. Users get best in class security from cloud computing service provider. A cloud hosting service provider deploys high quality closed circuit surveillance cameras, powerful firewalls, high tech antispyware software, robust antivirus software, highly efficient antimalware software, immensely sensitive threat detection system, sensitive intruder detection system, secure sockets layer data encryption technology, round the clock network monitoring, etc.
http://www.myrealdata.com/cloud-computing.html
May 30, 2012 9:48:27 AM

William Smith said:
In the beginning of the cloud era, there were really many negative opinions related to the security aspect of cloud computing. But, now it has been clarified by IT experts that cloud is really safe. A cloud computing service provider bestows utmost security on its clients’ data. Users get best in class security from cloud computing service provider. A cloud hosting service provider deploys high quality closed circuit surveillance cameras, powerful firewalls, high tech antispyware software, robust antivirus software, highly efficient antimalware software, immensely sensitive threat detection system, sensitive intruder detection system, secure sockets layer data encryption technology, round the clock network monitoring, etc.
http://www.myrealdata.com/cloud-computing.html


You sound a lot like a sales person, also why are you using your real name on a forum post? I think you're a bit to trusting of the internet.
June 21, 2012 12:56:08 AM

William Smith said:
In the beginning of the cloud era, there were really many negative opinions related to the security aspect of cloud computing. But, now it has been clarified by IT experts that cloud is really safe. A cloud computing service provider bestows utmost security on its clients’ data. Users get best in class security from cloud computing service provider. A cloud hosting service provider deploys high quality closed circuit surveillance cameras, powerful firewalls, high tech antispyware software, robust antivirus software, highly efficient antimalware software, immensely sensitive threat detection system, sensitive intruder detection system, secure sockets layer data encryption technology, round the clock network monitoring, etc.
http://www.myrealdata.com/cloud-computing.html



Hi :) 

Heheheh...all that security and then along comes Anonymous.....and it was all for nothing...

All the best Brett :) 
August 6, 2012 7:17:51 AM

I don't find any problem in using cloud computing service. After all it depends on your cloud computing service provider.
August 8, 2012 3:34:22 PM

drwho1 said:
NO, I will never trust my data to Skynet.


Love this, makes me want to watch Terminator. I don't trust Cloud services at all, I was using these so-called Cloud services well before they were even called the cloud, and there is nothing new or special about the term. I used to store school data on Megaupload before it was shut down for legal reasons, you never really know how legit a company is by appearances. I do use mediafire now for little things, but i would never use anything like iCloud or like services, because you never really know how safe your data really is, besides what they tell you. Yes, it might be space-saving not to have your own storage, but i have a file server for my home network, and this gives me peace of mind that i know exactly where everything is, and who really has access to it.
August 8, 2012 7:13:34 PM

mknabster said:
but i have a file server for my home network, and this gives me peace of mind that i know exactly where everything is, and who really has access to it.


Hi :) 

Totally agree with your last sentence... which says it all really.....

All the best Brett :) 
August 27, 2012 12:19:24 AM

Depends what you mean by "cloud computing" in the context of the question.

Off-site storage - no I don't fully trust it.

Something like Amazon EC2 where you can hire server time/resources to complete tasks you don't have the resources for, yep that's fine.

SMEs creating their own private cloud infrastructure using Citrix, VMware or Ubuntu Cloud etc, what's not to trust there?

I feel "Cloud Computing" is a term that is far too encompassing to be used with any great meaning.

September 11, 2012 12:57:52 PM

Sorry! I don't trust on cloud computing.
Anonymous
October 4, 2012 2:57:15 PM

I agree with tr2012, "Cloud Computing" is a term that has such a broad range of application that to apply it in a discussion on whether it's trustworthy is almost meaningless. The company I work for use a cloud service for our off-site backups. I know exactly were my data is (well the location of the datacentre) and it is encrypted with our own key pairs so even the storage hosting company cannot access it.

Someone mentioned Anonymous. Anonymous are a hacktivist group, I doubt a cloud storage company would make their target list, Lulzsec possibly - Anonymous unlikely.
October 4, 2012 8:49:39 PM

Think about this, when it comes to public clouds:

When you upload a photo of yourself onto your Facebook account, Facebook will at some point take an automated and normal back-up, which will include users' Facebook pages, including things like all their uploaded photos.

Now, if you decide to REMOVE that photo from your Facebook page, do you really believe that Facebook will also go into its tape back-ups and delete the photo from there as well...?!
December 2, 2012 2:47:44 AM

Encrypt first.
December 14, 2012 2:17:52 AM

Yes, i trust it , because i use it , and I think it is very accurate.
December 14, 2012 1:17:30 PM

Does anyone honestly believe that your data is safely behind the closed doors of your privately controlled network? Is anyone naive to think you've been able to shut the eyes of big brother? If someone wants at your data, they'll get it. The securities we admins use today are developed or at least dissected by them. The faith you have in your own abilities and hardware/software securities is an illusion. Your networks are no more secure from prying eyes than Cloud...

Cloud based services will be the next wave of technology, like Wireless, it will become a necessity in technology. The only ones who can dodge cloud will be small business network admins who are just as vulnerable through the copper they monitor as others through the clouds of skynet.

We might get this... there is no unbreakable system, if there were, we wouldn't be walking in every morning at 6AM applying the latest patch for an exploit that was just unearthed to hours before, and applying a second (or third) patch by the close of the business day by 5PM because there was another exploit found in that time.

I'm not saying we should do nothing, but we shouldn't suspect that our internal networks are any more secure from those who want at it, than if it were in another secure platform such as the Cloud.

Most of us as Admins know that our relentless quest to stay on top of every vulnerability, exploit and point of weakness is a desire to beat the bad guys... You honestly don't think they have just as big of a desire as we do? They're just as knowledgeable and calculative as we are... If you're system is a target, every day that passes is another dropped percentage point that its security will hold up.

I go with the cloud because of redundancy, less points of failure within the building and a global range of connectivity to all resources, the Pros far outweigh the Con which mainly come down to paranoia... Reminds me of senior citizens not wanting Internet in their home because they think a giant eyeball will peer at them through their monitor and invade their privacy... and yes, I've been told that.

Including the cloud, there's not a system in the world that isn't impervious to an attack if an attacker puts enough time effort and training into exploiting system weaknesses... Some say 'there's nobody out there like that' well, speaking from this side, I'm like that in securing my weaknesses, I would be foolish to think there isn't someone else on the other side of that weakness spending just as much time trying to exploit it.

Cloud for me, cautiously of course, but cloud nonetheless.

PS... For those super paranoid, there is always encryption!!! If you're just punching your data up to the cloud without any encryption service, I understand your paranoia... I'm paranoid for you. This along with several other alternatives would suffice in the 'weening off' of would be data sniffers wanting to probe the cloud for any data they come across.
December 14, 2012 3:46:44 PM

^alright but wouldn't putting all your sensitive info in a cloud network be increasing the risk? I mean whats a bigger target, your info on its own, or your info paired with hundreds of thousands of other peoples.
December 26, 2012 8:29:28 AM

I Don't trust over Cloud Computing at all.
December 26, 2012 12:01:34 PM

mouse24 said:
^alright but wouldn't putting all your sensitive info in a cloud network be increasing the risk? I mean whats a bigger target, your info on its own, or your info paired with hundreds of thousands of other peoples.


Not really. What's the difference between being in a cloud and locally hosting it? The attack vectors are pretty much the same minus a few techs at the cloud site(s) who maintain the systems. No worse off than anything else at that point. A cloud hosting company generally has far more invested into perimeter technology and has the staff dedicated to maintaining it, whereas when locally hosting it you're often tied up with multiple tasks. Also, cloud companies offer SLAs along with their general checks and how often they're tested which far exceeds that of any locally hosting company.

Given that, along with hundreds of thousands of other people's data, what is the increased threat? Since I deal in cloud computing and I know the risk is decreased, I'm curious to know why/where/how you believe the risk is increased?
December 26, 2012 12:33:16 PM

riser said:
Not really. What's the difference between being in a cloud and locally hosting it? The attack vectors are pretty much the same minus a few techs at the cloud site(s) who maintain the systems. No worse off than anything else at that point. A cloud hosting company generally has far more invested into perimeter technology and has the staff dedicated to maintaining it, whereas when locally hosting it you're often tied up with multiple tasks. Also, cloud companies offer SLAs along with their general checks and how often they're tested which far exceeds that of any locally hosting company.

Given that, along with hundreds of thousands of other people's data, what is the increased threat? Since I deal in cloud computing and I know the risk is decreased, I'm curious to know why/where/how you believe the risk is increased?



Hi :) 

So you think ANONYMOUS (or any other hacking group or individual) would bother hacking a single home user or a concentrated server cloud centre with thousands of users ?

Thats the risk... you could always ask SONY ...lol

All the best Brett :) 
December 26, 2012 3:00:49 PM

They would still need to select a target. If they're attacking your webserver, does it matter if it is hosted locally or on the cloud?

On a personal level, it doesn't quite matter. On a business level, the threat vector is the internet, it doesn't matter where it is hosted. If you have a web server and the internet, the attack vector persists. The cloud company will have better security in place than most companies can reasonably afford.
December 26, 2012 3:20:11 PM

riser said:
They would still need to select a target. If they're attacking your webserver, does it matter if it is hosted locally or on the cloud?

On a personal level, it doesn't quite matter. On a business level, the threat vector is the internet, it doesn't matter where it is hosted. If you have a web server and the internet, the attack vector persists. The cloud company will have better security in place than most companies can reasonably afford.


Hi :) 

And SONY couldn't afford the best protection ?

All the best Brett :) 


December 26, 2012 3:35:34 PM

Um, Brett, do you even know what cloud computing is?

They used EC2 to hack Sony. EC2 wasn't hacked. They attacked Sony's perimeter servers to gain access. Again, doesn't matter where it was, the attack vector was a perimeter server.
Anonymous
December 28, 2012 11:43:54 PM

Brett928S2 said:
Hi :) 

And SONY couldn't afford the best protection ?

All the best Brett :) 


The best protection money can buy is still vulnerable to attack if incorrectly configured or if exploitable vulnerabilities are left un-patched. Gary McKinnon breached US DoD and NASA systems with a script that searched for perimeter network devices with default passwords.
January 8, 2013 3:33:42 AM

Hello and thanks for the link.
January 18, 2013 2:04:28 PM

No, only as a backup and even then not for anything I wouldn't want other people to see
Anonymous
January 18, 2013 2:08:03 PM

basha312 said:
No, only as a backup and even then not for anything I wouldn't want other people to see


That's what encryption is for.
Anonymous
January 28, 2013 1:40:56 PM

Brett928S2 said:
Hi :) 

And SONY couldn't afford the best protection ?

All the best Brett :) 


Given the results of the ICO investigation it looks as though while Sony could quite easily have afforded the best protection ... they didn't bother.
February 5, 2013 9:53:54 PM

riser said:
Not really. What's the difference between being in a cloud and locally hosting it? The attack vectors are pretty much the same minus a few techs at the cloud site(s) who maintain the systems. No worse off than anything else at that point. A cloud hosting company generally has far more invested into perimeter technology and has the staff dedicated to maintaining it, whereas when locally hosting it you're often tied up with multiple tasks. Also, cloud companies offer SLAs along with their general checks and how often they're tested which far exceeds that of any locally hosting company.

Given that, along with hundreds of thousands of other people's data, what is the increased threat? Since I deal in cloud computing and I know the risk is decreased, I'm curious to know why/where/how you believe the risk is increased?


Verizon also invests millions into their cloud, and security and infrastructure, but their entire management and staff is incompetent. Do you seriously trust mega corporations with hired IT monkeys to protect your data and keep it online properly? That is pretty funny.
February 5, 2013 9:55:49 PM

Quote:
Given the results of the ICO investigation it looks as though while Sony could quite easily have afforded the best protection ... they didn't bother.


You're absolutely correct. And most large cloud providers are more interested in their bottom line than protecting your data or buying the best infrastructure. Do you think they care if they lose a few thousand clients, they just solicit more brainwashed sheep or buy out other companies. :lol: 
!