[EPIC] [RT] [40k] Imperial Robots

Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

I recently acquired two 40k Imperial Robots and I'm in the process of
sussing them out. Robots were before my time, so perhaps a more experienced
gamer can offer some advice.
Rather than what you think they *should* be in the current rules, does
anyone recall how they *were* treated back in their day?
In particular in the Epic ruleset, were they infantry or vehicular?
Were they on infantry bases (if so, how many per base), or stand alone?
Could they be transported in vehicles?

The 40k model(s) are smaller than I had previously thought, which prompted
the these questions.
--
Jon Hedge,
"The chances are, I said it in jest."

RGMW FAQ @ http://www.rgmw.org
11 answers Last reply
More about epic imperial robots
  1. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    "Jon Hedge" <ihug.com.au@dopefish> wrote in message
    news:42520aab$0$10595$5a62ac22@per-qv1-newsreader-01.iinet.net.au...

    >I recently acquired two 40k Imperial Robots and I'm in the process of
    >sussing them out. Robots were before my time, so perhaps a more experienced
    >gamer can offer some advice.
    > Rather than what you think they *should* be in the current rules, does
    > anyone recall how they *were* treated back in their day?

    yeah, they had their own amazingly complicated subset of construction rules
    and programming / actions (originally published in WD; the battle robot in
    the rulebook is much more basic), but in purely mechanical (ha ha) terms
    they used the standard profile rather than the vehicle one.

    > In particular in the Epic ruleset, were they infantry or vehicular?

    infantry

    > Were they on infantry bases (if so, how many per base), or stand alone?

    don't remember. I know they never made it past the first edition, so they
    probably came 3 to a base.

    > Could they be transported in vehicles?

    probably, although I can't remember specifically. at least, I don't recall
    them being an actual exception to any normal rules.

    jes goodwin had some really neat ideas for battle robots long ago, which
    never made the cut into production (although their influence could be seen
    in the first-generation necrons, to some extent). I liked his idea of
    simple, reliable drone units armed with low-tech weaponry - primarily
    designed to operate in theaters too hostile for the guardsmen themselves -
    much better than the big star-warsy robots they ended up producing.
  2. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    Based as singles
  3. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    Jon Hedge wrote:

    > Rather than what you think they *should* be in the current rules,
    does
    > anyone recall how they *were* treated back in their day?


    Hey,

    This file on 40k Imperial Robots was among my OCD archives.

    It makes oblique reference to transported maniples of bots.

    I do remember that, back in the Dark Ages,

    five classes of Imperial robot were availible:

    Crusader, Colossus, Cataphract, Castellan, and Conqueror.


    Imperial Robots
    -M Brunton, WD 104

    THE LEGIO CYBERNETICA

    The Legio is responsible for the care and construction of all Robots
    throughout the Imperium. Robots may be used by all kinds of Army and
    Marine forces, but they are always under the Legio's final control.
    Indeed, many of the Adepts of the Legio have been killed while taking
    part in military operations. The Legio continues to serve, aware of its
    value as a fighting force, even in the face of 90% plus casualties.

    The Legio is organised into several thousand cohorts, although only a
    percentage of these is ever active at any one time. Each cohort is in
    turn organised into maniples of three, four or five Robots plus a
    Legion tech-adept. The number of maniples in a cohort varies, but is
    rarely more than 100. However, a cohort is usually spread across an
    entire Marine force of several Chapters or a single Army. Battles
    involving more than 4 or 5 maniples are rare. This is not to say that
    they have never occurred - during the Horus Heresy in particular large
    numbers of Robots were committed by both sides in an effort to minimise
    human casualties until a decisive final battle could be fought.

    Each maniple is virtually a self-contained unit. The (typically) four
    units are managed on the battlefield by a single tech-adept. He has
    little more to do than give the Robot's their final programs and then
    monitor their progress. He is, however, also charged with making sure
    that a damaged Robot (which could be dangerous to its own side) is
    destroyed as quickly as possible. Each Robot carries a self-destruct
    system which can be detonated by remote control should its programming
    fail in some way. Although rarely present on the battlefield (if they
    can help it) there are also a number of other, lesser tech-adepts who
    perform all maintenance and repair functions for the maniple. Their
    services are also highly sought after for other purposes. It is said
    that a tech-adept of the Legio is worth his weight in spares and can
    repair virtually any item of Imperial equipment.

    Legio cohorts are occasionally attached to campaigning Marine Chapters,
    such as during Operation Carthage (the Second Pacification of Isstvan
    V). When the Desert Lions Chapter took the planet's defence forts they
    were preceded by a complete Legio Cohort of Robots. The Robots had been
    programmed to advance in an apparently mindless fashion, and proved
    easy targets for the defenders. However, the Desert Lions used the
    opportunity to map out the defenders' fire-plans and blind spots. In
    the Lions' ensuing assault only seven Marines were lost. All the
    surviving Robots were inducted into the Chapter as honorary members as
    a mark of respect.

    The Inquisition has also put Cohorts of the Legio to good use. Robots
    are, by their very natures, utterly incorruptible. Their preprogrammed,
    non-biological natures make them the perfect troops to use against
    mutants and other contaminated populations. The terror value of Robots
    when used against unprepared and underarmed troops has not gone
    unnoticed by the Inquisition. This, combined with their unflagging
    loyalty, has made them valued additions to the Inquisition's armoury.
    Cohorts attached to the Inquisition are usually staffed by
    technician-Inquisitors rather than Legio Adepts. Robots may be pure and
    incorruptible; men are not.

    This was proven during the Horus Heresy, when many Legio Cohorts
    rebelled under the leadership of Warmaster Horus. The Cohorts had been
    placed under the Warmaster's command in preparation for a new crusade.
    When Horus commanded his forces to move against the Emperor, the Legio
    Cohorts at his disposal were among those to obey. In the subsequent
    fighting many more of the Adeptus Mechanicus joined Horus and his
    rebels, but this did not alter the fact that parts of the Legio had
    been the first to declare for the Warmaster. Following the defeat of
    the Heresy and the banishment of the Traitor Legions, the dishonoured
    Legio Cohorts also fled into the Eye of Terror, where they remain to
    this day.

    Since the defeat of Horus the Legio Cybernetica has pledged itself anew
    to the Imperium. Its members now take binding oaths of loyalty more
    terrible than any Marine Chapter oaths. Over the millennia they have
    regained the respect and admiration of the rest of the Adeptus
    Mechanicus, the Imperial Guard, and the Adeptus Astartes.

    Legio maniples require less transport space than standard military
    units (Robots can be carried in open space without harm), less life
    support and food (Robots neither eat nor drink) and less battlefield
    support (Robots usually carry their own heavy weapons). Many Robots use
    standard armaments, reducing the need for specialised supplies, and can
    interchange parts with Dreadnoughts. All this makes them extremely
    popular with practical military commanders.

    Some of the older Cybernetica cohorts claim that their Robotic troops
    date, in part at least, back to the First Crusade of the Imperium and
    earlier. These claims may have some validity, as Robots are often
    cannibalised to provide parts for their damaged brethren. Given the
    lifespans of Imperial technologies when maintained, such claims become
    reasonable. It is indeed possible that one Robot's leg, or Power Field
    or cortex has been in almost constant use for more than ten thousand
    years.

    Like a Dreadnought, a Robot is the product of the many advanced
    technologies which have produced its armoured shell, its artificial
    muscle and nerve bundles, its cortex, power plant, weapons control
    systems, equipment interfaces and cortex. The Mechanicus Weapon-shops
    turn out many Robots to the age-old designs held in the memory banks.
    Castellan and Crusader pattern Robots, for example, are known to have
    fought on both sides during the Horns Heresy. The designs have remained
    virtually unchanged since that time, with perhaps only minor cosmetic
    variations.

    Many Robot components are identical (or nearly so) to Dreadnought
    parts. This compatibility simplifies many supply and repair problems.
    Legio cohorts have, for example, been cannibalised out of existence to
    provide spares for Dreadnought suits! In return Legio Cybernetica
    adepts have not been averse to dismantling Dreadnought suits -
    sometimes even killing the pilot in the process - when making
    battlefield repairs.

    What makes a Robot different from an unoccupied Dreadnought suit is its
    cortex. This is an artificial brain of sorts, which is constructed from
    artificial proteins and enzymes. This cortex is imprinted with simple
    maintenance and movement routines - a rudimentary 'mind'. These enable
    the Robot to obey simple instructions ("Open the Weapon Bay Door,
    Please... Move Ahead to the Holding Area" etc) when away from the
    battlefield. These 'firmware' routines (so called because they are
    'wired in' software) are often patterned after living creatures, and a
    Robot may develop a dog-like devotion to its technician-master.

    Before a battle the firmware routines are overlaid and replaced by the
    Robot's combat wetware (ie the software of a protein computer). This
    new cortex program, which can be changed for every battle, defines, for
    example, how and when the Robot is to fire its weapons or detonate its
    self-destruct charges.

    Each piece of wetware is held in a small slice of bioplastic, about the
    same size as a credit card. Many warriors take these from 'dead'
    robots, believing that them to hold the soul and courage of the robot.
    When kept in a medicine pouch some of the robot's bravery passes into
    the warrior; even some Marine Chapters have been known to follow this
    tradition.
    Without its cortex a Robot is as helpless as a bolter without a Marine.
    It can do nothing other than take whatever punishment is meted out to
    it. With its cortex fully programmed, however, a Robot can prove itself
    the equal of many other creatures on the battlefield.


    Playa

    --

    HTH
  4. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    "Doctor Rock" <malafex@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:vcp4e.32062$C12.19811@fe1.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    >
    >> Could they be transported in vehicles?
    >
    > probably, although I can't remember specifically. at least, I don't
    > recall them being an actual exception to any normal rules.
    >

    Thank-you Doctor, for your reply :)

    Can anyone else help clarify the outstanding question? I'm really chasing a
    solid informed reply on this point.
    --
    Jon Hedge,
    "The chances are, I said it in jest."

    First time e-mails should be tagged [RGMW] to make it through my spam
    filter.

    RGMW FAQ @ http://www.rgmw.org
  5. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    Jon Hedge wrote:
    >>> Could they be transported in vehicles?
    >>
    >> probably, although I can't remember specifically. at least, I don't
    >> recall them being an actual exception to any normal rules.
    >
    > Can anyone else help clarify the outstanding question? I'm really
    > chasing a solid informed reply on this point.

    Here's the text from the Ork and Squat Warlords book (c) 1992 by GW (no
    infringement intended) for the Squat Robots (should be similar to Imperial,
    IIRC):

    Robots make a solid if somewhat limited troops because they rely on a
    program which determines what they do on the battlefield. Despite this they
    ahve many advantages over ordinary troops, as they are stronger, better
    armed and do not need to check morale. The technical expertise of the Squat
    Engineers Guild has enabled them to maintain a substantial force of robots,
    some of which date back to the Age of Strife. Robot models are quite large
    and come with their own base, but it is a good idea to glue each robot onto
    a separate 20mm x 20mm square of card or a spare plastic base. Squat robots
    fight in detachments which consist of five models.

    Robot detachments operate independently according to their program. They do
    not take morale checks, cannot be broken, and do not require orders.

    Before starting play, you must give each detachment of robots a program
    which it will follow for the duration of the game. The program consists of
    a list of four situations and a command for each.

    The situations are:

    If there are enemy in charge reach
    If there are enemy within weapon range
    If there are enemy in sight
    In any other situation.

    To make a program write down the four situations in the sequence tgiven and
    choose a command which applies for each. Write down the command next to the
    situation. You may choose any of the following commands:

    Charge: Charge nearest enemy unit. THe robots must enter close combat
    if possible. Otherwise, they must move at between normal and full charge
    rate towards the nearest enemy.

    Capture: Advance towards nearest objective counter. The robots must
    move at between half and full normal rate.

    Advance: Advance towards nearest enemy unit. The robots must move at
    between half and their full normal move distance towards the nearest enemy
    unit and may fire upon it in the advance fire segment.

    First Fire: Fire on nearest enemy in the first fire segment.

    Fall Back: Move directly towards your own table edge. Robots will not
    approach closer to enemy as they fall back.

    Ignore: Ignore the situation described.

    In each orders phase consult the program for the robot detachment. Reach
    down the list of situations, starting with 'enemy in charge reach' until you
    find the first condition that applies to one or more robots in the
    detachment. As soon as you reach a situation that applies implement the
    order written against it.

    For example, the following program might be devised and used to send a Robot
    detachmetn to capture an objective:

    If there are enemy in charge reach -- First fire
    If there are enemy within weapon range -- Ignore
    If there are enemy in sight -- Ignore
    In any other situation -- Capture

    This program would allow the Robot to attack their enemy more directly,
    leaving a final option to move towards an objective.

    If there are enemy in charge reach -- Charge
    If there are enemy within weapon range -- Advance
    If there are enemy in sight -- Advance
    In any other situation -- Capture

    Troop Type: Robots
    Move: 10cm
    Saving Throw: 5+
    CAF: +2
    Weapons: Autocannon
    Range: 75cm
    Attack Dice: 1
    Roll to Hit: 5+
    Target's Save Mod.: 0
    Notes: Special rules.

    Ork Robots (listed in the same book) are similar, except:

    "Tinbotz Mobz are not subject to the Ork command rule because tehy receive
    their instructions from the Mekboy who is doubtless concealed nearby them.
    However there are practical difficulties in issuing dozens of separate
    command to the Tinbotz, made worse by the delay between the Tinbotz
    receiving their orders and executing them. To represent these problems you
    have to place orders for Tinbotz at the end of the movement phase. On the
    first turn of the game place and reveal orders as normal. At the end of the
    movement phase place another order counter face down next to your Tinbotz
    Mob. These are the orders which you will use next turn. This means you
    will have to judge the situation carefully to preduct what the best orders
    for next turn will be."

    The orders you could give were Charge, Advance, First Fire, and Fall Back.

    Troop Type: Tinbot
    Move: 10cm
    Saving Throw: 4+
    CAF: +4
    Weapons: Autocannon
    Range: 25cm
    Attack Dice: 2
    Roll to Hit: 4+
    Target's Save Mod.: 0


    Hope that helps.

    --gair
  6. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    "gair" <gaire-nospam@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    news:TpK4e.1630$An2.1402@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    >
    > Here's the text from the Ork and Squat Warlords book (c) 1992 by GW (no
    > infringement intended) for the Squat Robots (should be similar to
    > Imperial, IIRC):
    >
    <snip>
    >
    > Troop Type: Robots
    > Move: 10cm
    > Saving Throw: 5+
    > CAF: +2
    > Weapons: Autocannon
    > Range: 75cm
    > Attack Dice: 1
    > Roll to Hit: 5+
    > Target's Save Mod.: 0
    > Notes: Special rules.
    <snip>

    Thanks for that, gair. I notice that there's no mention of actual transport
    ability (correct me if I missed a line,) but the troop type is listed as
    "Robot", rather than Infantry or Vehicular, which might suggest against the
    transport option.
    I appreciate the effort you went to in your reply. :)
    --
    Jon Hedge,
    "The chances are, I said it in jest."

    First time e-mails should be tagged [RGMW] to make it through my spam
    filter.

    RGMW FAQ @ http://www.rgmw.org
  7. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    "Playa" <hurlgen40k@aol.com> wrote in message
    news:1112806835.334585.146600@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    > Jon Hedge wrote:
    >
    > This file on 40k Imperial Robots was among my OCD archives.
    >
    > It makes oblique reference to transported maniples of bots.

    I've always assumed the reference there is to logistics rather than
    battlefield transport. I honestly don't recall whether robots did have an
    embark/disembark program, but I would guess that as they predate most
    transport vehicles in 40K it was never specifically covered.
  8. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    "Doctor Rock" <malafex@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:poY4e.46959$Nr5.18480@fe2.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    >
    > "Playa" <hurlgen40k@aol.com> wrote in message
    > news:1112806835.334585.146600@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    >> Jon Hedge wrote:
    >>
    >> This file on 40k Imperial Robots was among my OCD archives.
    >>
    >> It makes oblique reference to transported maniples of bots.
    >
    > I've always assumed the reference there is to logistics rather than
    > battlefield transport. I honestly don't recall whether robots did have an
    > embark/disembark program, but I would guess that as they predate most
    > transport vehicles in 40K it was never specifically covered.
    White Dwarf 112 has an extensive write on them(as per previous long essay).
    It describes them as similar to dreadnoughts but have no crew. but in all
    aspects, they are a dreadnought.

    berto
  9. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    Jon Hedge wrote:

    > Thanks for that, gair. I notice that there's no mention of actual
    > transport ability (correct me if I missed a line,) but the troop type
    > is listed as "Robot", rather than Infantry or Vehicular, which might
    > suggest against the transport option.

    As I recall, we always treated them as too large/unwieldy for transport
    (even though you seem to be able to fit a heckuva lot of Marines in armour
    inside of a Rhino) and since you couldn't give them an order to "disembark,"
    it was a moot issue, anyway.

    > I appreciate the effort you went to in your reply. :)

    My pleasure.

    --gair
  10. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    On Thu, 07 Apr 2005 00:23:53 GMT, "gair" <gaire-nospam@earthlink.net>
    wrote:

    >Jon Hedge wrote:
    >
    >As I recall, we always treated them as too large/unwieldy for transport

    IIRC there were a few vehicles that could transport then, Capitol
    Imperialis, Drops ships, etc.

    --
    Lane
  11. Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

    Lane Shutt wrote:

    >> As I recall, we always treated them as too large/unwieldy for
    >> transport
    >
    > IIRC there were a few vehicles that could transport then, Capitol
    > Imperialis, Drops ships, etc.

    Could be; but I played Squats and they had little that could transport them.
    I suppose you could say the Leviathan could have carried Robots, but we
    still ran into the issue of having no defined way of giving them "disembark"
    orders. Given the restrictions on the programming available, there really
    wasn't a way for me even to program them like, "If the door opens, advance."
    It's possible the IG had different programming available to them, though.

    I should probably also be honest and admit that, although I had the Robots,
    I rarely used them because they tended to fall behind everything else (if
    you can believe that, with how slow Squats ran anyway) and were a pain to
    worry about. Much easier to get the ol' multi-melta trikes out, do a few
    Guild Hit and Run Tactics, and form my Brotherhoods into hollow squares...
    <grin>

    --gair
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